In Memoriam

  • Jonathan Pearson posted an article
    We remember those who served our country in the Peace Corps and recently passed away. see more

    The Peace Corps community mourns doctors, a teacher and interpreter, and the "voice of Wisconsin Public Television" this month.
     

    Chidinma "Chi" Ezeani (1989-2019) had recently been approved for a third-year extension as an agriculture Volunteer in Ghana. After suffering injuries sustained from an accident in her home, Chi died during treatment at a South African hospital. After graduating from the University of California, Riverside in 2011 with degrees in accounting and finance, Chi was hired by the financial firm Foresight ASG. During this time, she volunteered her services as an accounting and business consultant for several non-profit organizations in the San Francisco area. She also studied film at the San Francisco School of Digital Filmmaking and worked in film production.

     

    Jeffrey P. Golden (1942-2019) was a master communicator and the voice of Wisconsin Public Television. As the grandson of refugees from Eastern Europe and Russia, Yiddish expressions peppered his everyday speech. He wrote poetry in both English and Spanish. He enhanced his language proficiency serving in the Peace Corps in Colombia from 1965-1966.  Throughout his career, he produced Spanish language videos; wrote editorials in Spanish newspapers; and provided Spanish language outreach services. In his retirement, he served as a volunteer medical translator at Madison, Wisconsin’s only free health clinic. His work in film resulted in awards from the John Muir Medical Film Festival, the National Educational Film and Video Festival, the International Film and Television Festival of New York, the Cine Awards, the Festival of the Americas, the Telly Awards and the Industrial Film Festival Award for Creative Excellence. Jeffrey also enjoyed being an actor in theater productions in Madison, Wisconsin, playing title roles in Macbeth, Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf, and Fiddler on the Roof. 

     

    Madeline Kaufman Havrilla (1957-2019) studied abroad in Spain while she was a student at Indiana University of Pennsylvania in the 1970’s. She became a Peace Corps Volunteer in the Dominican Republic. Following her service, Madeline traveled to New Orleans to earn her Master’s Degree at Loyola University. She joined the U.S. Department of Labor, serving many years as an investigator to enforce labor laws. She became a union leader, serving her labor department colleagues as vice president and president of AFGE Local 2450. In her private life, Madeline led a Catholic women’s foot washing protest in 1986, advocated for community health and environment issues in Pennsylvania with Sustainable Monroeville, and worked for education improvements within the Gateway School District.

     

    Gordon Frederick Comstock, MD (1943-2019) believed in leaving his campsite – and the worldbetter than he found it. After graduating from Antioch College, Gordon joined the Peace Corps, teaching math in Ghana from 1966-68. He completed his medical studies at Case Western Reserve University and completed his residency at University of Rochester/Highland Hospital Family Medicine Program. Gordon was originally contracted for two years in a “doctor shortage” area; he and his family chose to stay and mentored medical students at his office and took them home for dinner. From 1989 to 2017, Gordon made 29 trips to La Laguna, Honduras as part of NY/HELP mission.

     

    Dr. Dan Mackey, who provided healthcare as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Borneo, graduated from the University of Oklahoma and finished his medical education at the University of Virginia. Upon completion of medical training, Dan began a life of world travel, visiting more than 150 countries. At one point in his career, Dan was the head of the Dermatology department at the King Faisal Specialist Hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. A career in Atlanta began at the Center for Disease Control before opening his own practice. Dan was on the Medical School staff at Emory University; he served in the Emory clinic and trained dermatology residents.

     

    Peter W. Bailey (1940-2019) served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Thailand after graduating from Harvard University in 1962. He also worked for UNICEF. His career included teaching at the Texas Commission for the Blind in Tyler, TX; Notre Dame Special Schools in Irving, TX; and ESL for Dallas Community Colleges. Peter also worked as an interpreter in the Asian refugee project affiliated with El Centro College.

       

    Below is our In Memoriam list for members of the Peace Corps community who recently passed away:

     

    MULTIPLE COUNTRIES

    Timothy John Belay (Albania; Mongolia) 10/12/19

    Louis Giordano III (Ecuador 1999-2001; Panama 2009-10), 11/4/19

     

    BOLIVIA

    Nancy Sturdivant (1962-64), 10/25/19

     

    CAMEROON

    Richard Bartosiewicz, 10/22/19

    Roberta Glaser (Kley) Carlsen, 10/29/19

     

    CHILE

    William Michael Murphy (1964-66), 7/19

     

    COLOMBIA

    Jeffrey P. Golden (1965-66), 9/30/19

     

    COSTA RICA

    Reta J. Holmgren, 11/1/19

    Pedro Lujan (staff), 11/11/19

     

    DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

    Patricia Anton, 11/12/19

    Madeline Kaufman Havrilla (1980-83), 11/16/19

    John Kevin Murphy (1966-69), 9/8/19

    Virginia Streator (1969-71), 11/9/19

     

    ECUADOR

    Joan Ward, 10/19/19

     

    ETHIOPIA

    Wyn Tunnicliff (1966-68), 10/9/19

     

    FEDERATED STATES OF MICRONESIA

    Melba Lucille Shepard (1988-90), 10/30/19

     

    GHANA

    Gordon F. Comstock, MD (1966-68), 10/25/19

    Chidinma Ezeani (2017-19), 10/26/19

    Ronald Kenneth Maxwell (1963-65), 10/7/19

     

    GUATEMALA

    Therese Marie "Teri" (Mignard) Duffy, 6/25/19

     

    JAMAICA

    Bernice Marie Stainbrook (1990-92), 11/9/19

     

    KIRIBATI

    Lela Mayberry (1984-86), 10/29/19

     

    KYRGYZSTAN

    William Joseph Heaphy (1994-96), 10/20/19

     

    LIBERIA

    Jay D. Griffing (1967-68), 9/25/19

     

    MALAYSIA

    Dan Mackey, 11/8/19

     

    NAMIBIA

    Jennifer Schlecht, 11/6/19

     

    ST. LUCIA

    Sidney A. (Sid) Patchett III (1969-72), 9/18/19

     

    SAMOA

    Barbara Mannella, 10/17/19

     

    SOUTH KOREA

    Michael S. Kraskowski (1970-72), 11/16/19

     

    TANZANIA

    George Lewis Edgington (1963-66), 11/9/19

     

    THAILAND

    Peter Welles Bailey, 10/31/19

    Armin Richard Konrad, 10/14/19

     

    UKRAINE

    David Patrick Phelps (2005-07), 10/28/19

     

    COUNTRY OF SERVICE NOT SPECIFIED

    John Osborne, 11/10/19

    Joyce Stone, 10/22/19

    Donald M. Witlin, 10/26/19

     

     

     

     

    If you have information you would like to share for our monthly In Memoriam post, contact obituary@peacecorpsconnect.org.

    Thanks to Betty Pyle for her assistance in preparing this month's In Memoriam page.

  • Jonathan Pearson posted an article
    We honor members of the Peace Corps community who recently passed away. see more

    As we honor the 58th anniversary of the signing of the Peace Corps Act, we remember the accomplishments of those who recently passed away with the distinction of being known as Returned Peace Corps Volunteers.

     

    Dr. Thomas Andrew Boyd (1942-2019) served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Colombia before beginning his distinguished international teaching career. Dr. Boyd studied at Wabash College; The Institute of Social Studies, The Netherlands; and earned his Doctorate at Cambridge University. Dr. Boyd’s diverse assignments included teaching at West Virginia Wesleyan College, Wolfson College, The Hague, Netherlands; and University of Cape Coast, Ghana, West Africa. He was a visiting professor of sociology at Zhongshan University in the People's Republic of China; a participant with Habitat for Humanity International in Peru; a consultant, Rural Development Planner/Trainer with United Nations Food and Agriculture mission to Zambia; a research assistant with the Institute of Social Studies, The Netherlands; and a workshop leader for Economic Development in Puerto Rico. For 29 years before his retirement, Dr. Boyd taught at Berea College and served as Chair of the Department of Sociology.

     

    Dorothy Elizabeth (Betsy) Brown's career as a reporter at The New York Times and other papers began at the University of California, Berkeley, where she wrote for the student paper. After the start of World War II, she left college to work on a dock, took a troop ship to Hawaii, and joined the Women's Air Raid Defense. After the war, she was a reporter at The Honolulu Advertiser and then the San Francisco Examiner. After a move to New York City, she eventually became a writer at Newsweek. For many years Betsy was a reporter at The Patent Trader in Mt. Kisco, NY.  Betsy received numerous awards, including a national prize for a series on the burdens on corporate wives. In the late 1960s she became director of communications for the Urban Development Corp. in Westchester. After retiring, she went to Antigua for two years with the Peace Corps, where she lived over a store in a small inland village and worked with the Chamber of Commerce, organized a women's sewing group, and survived Hurricane Hugo in 1989.

     

    Janice Jaeger Burns was a public health advocate, Peace Corps Volunteer, and globetrotting adventurer. A graduate of St. Joseph College and Boston University School of Nursing, she was among the first Peace Corps volunteers sent to Malaysia in 1962. Janice deepened her commitment to public health with positions at the World Health Organization, the Pan American Health Organization, Project Hope, and the Aga Khan University, living and working in a number of countries including Pakistan, Columbia, Ethiopia, and Venezuela. 

     

    Bruce MacBain was an author, scholar, and teacher. He served in the Peace Corps in Malaysia. Bruce taught ancient history at Vanderbilt and Boston Universities after earning his B.A. in Classics from the University of Chicago and his Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania. His historical novels Roman Games and The Bull Slayer are mysteries set in ancient Rome. His trilogy, Odd Tanglehair's Saga, is a Viking coming-of-age story set in 1000 AD. His forthcoming action/thriller, Shanghai Blues, follows an African-American jazz trumpeter caught up in opium gangs and communist cadres in 1927 Shanghai.

     

    Ira Okun served his country as a veteran of the Korean War and in Ghana as Deputy Director of Peace Corps from 1968-1971. Although early in his career Ira worked with delinquents as a probation officer and Superintendent of Marin County's Juvenile Hall, he shifted his career to work in prevention programs, taking a series of leadership positions at nonprofits serving youth and families. Ira served as executive director of a residential program for troubled teenage girls, and as CEO of Family Service Agency of San Francisco. Ira managed programs in geriatrics, mental health, teen pregnancy, child development, and child abuse prevention. He was the founding president of the California Association of Local Conservation Corps, which generated income to improve educational and occupational programs for at-risk youth.

     

    Dr. William Lloyd Paly worked in rural health in Liberia as a Peace Corps Volunteer after earning his undergraduate degree from Clark University in 1975. In 1981, he earned a M.A. from the Harvard School of Public Health before starting his career as a physician. Bill attended the University of Massachusetts School of Medicine, completed his residency in Orthopedic Surgery at Yale University, and a fellowship in hand surgery at Tufts University. Since joining Coastal Orthopedic Associates at Beverly Hospital in 1992, he helped thousands of patients.

     

    Mary Burch (Tracy) Ford attended Trinity College in Washington, DC, but, rather than graduate, she withdrew to work in Baltimore, then in London, England. She joined the Peace Corps in 1967, where she served in Senegal at a social center with a kindergarten, adult literacy classes, and prenatal health classes. There she met Brian Ford who was also serving as a Peace Corps Volunteer. The couple moved to Boston, where she finished college at Boston University, magna cum laude.  She then earned a M.A. in Social Work at Simmons College.  Professional positions included serving as a residential counselor at Groton School, Dean of Students, and then Head of School at Miss Porters School, where the library is now named the M. Burch Tracy Ford Library. Upon retiring, she served on multiple boards, including the Maranyundo Girls School in Rwanda, Kings Academy in Jordan, and the Council for International Educational Exchange.

     

    Joan Mary Ambre was Superior of the Convent and Principal of the Aquin High School in Freeport, IL. During her 15 years as a Dominican nun, Joan received both a B.A. and a M.A. in English literature. Joan met Earl Ambre in 1967, left the Dominican Order in 1969, and together they joined Peace Corps, where they made life-long connections in Jamaica, Barbados, and Lesotho. Joan held many administrative positions in the Peace Corps, Bureau of Land Management, and Departments of Labor and Interior. Joan retired as the Director of Personnel for the Peace Corps in 1996.

     

    Sister Hilda Carey taught in various Sacred Heart high schools in New York, Connecticut, and Michigan. She earned a M.A. at Manhattanville College, in Purchase, NY. She learned basic Korean with the Peace Corps in Korea, and developed a particular love for Korea and Japan. She also taught at the International School in Tokyo, Japan. She became professor of English at the Sacred Heart College for Women, Chun Cheon and Pucheon, Korea. During these years, she also taught at the University of Maryland, University College campus in Seoul, Korea. Sister Carey returned to New York and worked at Green Hope Services for Women in East Harlem, where she helped formerly incarcerated women prepare for their GED. In 1986, she began teaching at Boston College, a position she held until well into her eighties.

     

    Dr. James "Jim" Fallon McTigue was in the inaugural class of the Peace Corps providing modern health care in Bolivia. After Peace Corps, he served our nation's most needy, becoming the first Chief Scientist of the U.S. Public Health Service. He co-authored the Surgeon General's Report on AIDS. After retiring from the Public Health Service, Captain McTigue went on to direct the Master of Public Health program at the University of South Carolina School of Public Health.

     

    Below is our In Memoriam list for members of the Peace Corps community who recently passed away:

     

    PEACE CORPS STAFF

    Joan Mary Ambre, 9/18/19

     

    MULTIPLE COUNTRIES

    James Jarrett Rusk (Sierra Leone 1961-63; Uganda staff 1964-68), 10/7/19

    Daynese Santos (staff Swaziland 2005-13; Burkina Faso 2005), posted 10/9/19

     

    ANTIGUA

    Dorothy Elizabeth (Betsy) Brown (1988-1990), 9/26/19

     

    BELIZE

    James Kendall Shipman, 9/23/19

     

    BOLIVIA

    James Fallon McTigue (1962-1964), 9/22/19

     

    COLOMBIA

    Joan Craig Clark Stewart, 9/13/19

     

    DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

    Jeffrey Thomas "Freddie" Carter, 8/9/19

     

    GHANA

    Ira Okun (staff 1968-1971), 9/30/19

     

    JAMAICA

    Norman Jerome "Jerry" Domann, 10/6/19

     

    LESOTHO

    Don Hanni (1993-1994), 10/15/19

     

    LIBERIA

    Dr. William L. Paly (1976-1978), 10/7/19

     

    MALAWI

    Lynn Earl Blough (1982-1984), 9/21/19

     

    MALAYSIA

    Laura Jangla Audrey, 9/28/19

    Janice Burns (1962-1964), 9/22/19

    Bruce MacBain (1964-1965), 9/27/19

     

    MOROCCO

    Carey E. Bell, 9/30/19

     

    NIGER

    Leonard Strauss (1964-1966), 9/21/19

     

    NIGERIA

    George P. Clarke (1961-1963), 8/15/19

    Edward Alonza Holmes (staff 1966), 8/12/19

     

    PHILIPPINES

    John E. Arnold (1962-1964), 10/4/19

    Mike Charles, 12/24/18

     

    SENEGAL

    Mary Burch Ford (1967-1969), 10/2/19

     

    SIERRA LEONE

    Bette Maxwell (1987-1989), 9/29/19

     

    SOUTH KOREA

    Sister Hilda Carey, 9/16/19

    Phil Suttle, posted 9/28/19

     

    TANZANIA

    Charles Rock, 10/12/19

     

    TONGA

    Lara Ethel Payne (2007-2009) 8/5/19

     

    COUNTRY OF SERVICE NOT SPECIFIED

    James Connell, 9/28/19

    Shirley Ellis-Knoernschild (1986-1987), 12/13/18

    Robert B. Francis, 9/22/19

    William L. "Scott" Gard, 7/23/19

    George Scholz, 9/16/19

    Ed Ward, 10/13/19

     

     

     

     

    If you have information you would like to share for our monthly In Memoriam post, contact obituary@peacecorpsconnect.org.

    Thanks to Betty Pyle for her assistance in preparing this month's In Memoriam page.

  • Jonathan Pearson posted an article
    Remembering those whose legacy includes Peace Corps service. see more

    As we honor the 58th anniversary of the signing of the Peace Corps Act, we remember the accomplishments of those who recently passed away with the distinction of being known as Returned Peace Corps Volunteers.

       

    Carol Chuckrow Guernsey died just two months after celebrating her 50th wedding anniversary with her husband Sherwood, with whom she had served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Panama. The meaningful relationships they developed in Panama informed them in ways that served them the rest of their lives; they became avid supporters and advocates of immigrants. Later in life, Carol and Sherwood returned to Panama to start computer learning centers that are still operating today. They also traveled throughout Latin America, the Caribbean, many European countries, and Guernsey Island. Carol earned a B.A. from Mt. Holyoke College, a degree in nursing from Russell Sage College, and a master's degree in nurse midwifery from the Frontier School of Nursing. Carol and Sherwood have been very generous supporters of NPCA over the years.

     

    Dr. Thomas Andrew Boyd (1942-2019) served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Colombia before beginning his distinguished international teaching career. Dr. Boyd studied at Wabash College; The Institute of Social Studies, The Netherlands; and earned his Doctorate at Cambridge University. He was published extensively. Dr. Boyd’s diverse assignments included teaching at West Virginia Wesleyan College, Wolfson College, The Hague, Netherlands; and University of Cape Coast, Ghana, West Africa. He was a visiting professor of sociology at Zhongshan University in the People's Republic of China; a participant with Habitat for Humanity International in Peru; a consultant, Rural Development Planner/Trainer with United Nations Food and Agriculture mission to Zambia; a research assistant with the Institute of Social Studies, The Netherlands; and a workshop leader for Economic Development in Puerto Rico. For 29 years before his retirement, Dr. Boyd taught at Berea College and served as Chair of the Department of Sociology.

      

    Kathy Lynn Radimer (1951-2019) was a nutritionist researcher and scholar. She served in the Peace Corps in Upper Volta/Burkina Faso in 1975-1978 and went on to work with USAID in Cameroon in 1979-1982. Through these experiences, she developed a love of Africa. She completed her B.A. and M.Ed. at the University of Massachusetts, and her Ph.D. in nutrition at Cornell University. Her doctoral thesis work resulted in the Radimer-Cornell Hunger Scale, which was further developed and used as a measure of hunger/food insecurity on a global scale. In Australia in the late 1980s, she worked as a Research Fellow for the National Health and Medical Research Council at the University of Queensland. When she returned to the U.S. in the late 1990s, Kathy became a Fellow with the National Cancer Institute. She then worked for the Centers for Disease Control as an epidemiologist.

     

    Westcott "Wes" Burlingame III (1946-2019) served in Peace Corps Thailand and worked in public health abroad before starting his own business, Laurel Springs Nursery, and leading tree-planting projects back in the U.S. Wes earned a B.A. in political science from Ohio Wesleyan University. After his Peace Corps service, primarily in malaria eradication, Wes received a master's degree in public health from the University of Michigan. Wes worked in refugee relief with USAID in Laos and farmed in Fiji before serving for two years with UNICEF-Kathmandu in maternal-child health programs. He spoke Thai fluently and returned annually to enjoy Thai culture, friends, and cuisine. Wes pursued his love of horticulture, working at the Biltmore Estate vineyards and the Mountain Horticultural Crops Research Station in Mills River.

     

    James S. Wilson’s (1947-2019) 72 years were filled working with his hands and enjoying the outdoors. After graduation from the University of Minnesota, he joined the Peace Corps and taught in a school in Fiji. As an RPCV, Jim spent a month traversing Glacier Park in Montana. He emigrated from the U.S. to Canada and taught in Deadwood Alberta, while living in a tee-pee he sewed himself. While in Canada, he worked in oil fields, built a log building, climbed peaks of the Canadian Rockies, and built and flew an ultralight plane. Jim got his pilot's license and bought a biplane, the Wichawk; other planes followed, including a Jenny replica and the Zenair CH701, which he loaded with camping gear and took on many a trip around the Pacific Northwest and California. He bought a kit to build an RV12, got his floatplane certification, and his airframe and powerplant ticket so he could be the mechanic on his own planes. Jim learned about the "stitch and glue" technique of building small watercraft and he went all in, buying plans and kits by the dozen. One of his hopes was to participate in the Race to Alaska in a small boat of his own design. Friends said Jim lived with “enthusiasm, curiosity, integrity and optimism.”

       

    Below is our In Memoriam list for members of the Peace Corps community who recently passed away:

     

    BOLIVIA

    Shirley Ann Haase, 9/6/19

     

    BRAZIL

    Chester L. Davis II, 9/19/19

    Lynda Witcher Peddy (1966-1967), 8/4/19

     

    BURKINA FASO

    Kathy Radimer (1975-1978), 9/5/19

     

    CHILE

    Sterling Edwin "Ned" Zimmerman Jr., 9/8/19

     

    COLOMBIA

    Thomas A. Boyd (1964-1966), 8/20/19

    Barbara Muchisky (1965-1966), 4/29/19

    Martha Louise Cooch Ramsey, 9/15/19

     

    DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

    Robert Bowden Law (1962-1964), 9/1/19

     

    ECUADOR

    Robert Joseph "Bob" Fey, 9/15/19

     

    ETHIOPIA

    Anne Marie Bussey (1967-1969), 8/21/19

     

    FIJI

    James S. Wilson, 8/21/19

     

    GABON

    John Vincent Mascolo Jr. (1963-1965), 9/7/19

     

    HONDURAS

    Landon Karr (2006-2008), 9/13/19

     

    JAMAICA

    Richard Arthur "Dick" Cozine (1991-1993), 8/16/19

     

    KENYA

    Emily Anne Distler CHA/PA, 8/1/19

     

    LESOTHO

    William Kevin "Bill" Savage Jr. (1977-1979), 8/31/19

     

    LIBERIA

    Elaine deProsse (1967-1968), 9/14/19

     

    MAURITANIA

    Stephanie Joyce Kimball (1986-1987), 9/8/19

     

    NIGERIA

    Daniel Paul Conroy (1967-1969), 8/27/19

    Michael A. (Hryhoryszyn) Gregory, 9/5/19

    Millard Hayes Jr. (1966-1968), 9/15/19

    Carol (Martin) Schneckloth (1963-1965), 7/19

     

    PANAMA

    Carol Guernsey (1969-1971), 9/1/19

     

    PERU

    Eliot Levinson (1964-1966), 9/5/19

     

    PHILIPPINES

    Preston Hayes, 8/19/19

    Carl Castleman Smith, 9/4/19

    Stanley J. Szalak (1971-1974), 9/19/19

    Marie Ward (1965-1967), 4/25/19

     

    SENEGAL

    Roger Alan Harding (1986-1988), 8/17/19

    Kristin Anne Regan, 9/15/19

     

    SWAZILAND

    Amanda De Fiebre (2007-2009), 8/30/19

    Stephen T. Oblock (1971-1975), 8/31/19

     

    TANZANIA

    Joel William "Bill" Chapman (1964-1965), 9/12/19

    Jacob Podsialdo, 9/8/19

     

    THAILAND

    Westcott "Wes" Burlingame III (1968-1970), 9/24/19

     

    UGANDA

    Deanna Mary Sterett, 7/27/19

     

    VENEZUELA

    Robert G. Black (1964-1966), 8/30/19

     

     

     

     

     

    If you have information you would like to share for our monthly In Memoriam post, contact obituary@peacecorpsconnect.org.

    Thanks to Betty Pyle for her assistance in preparing this month's In Memoriam page.

  • Jonathan Pearson posted an article
    We remember those who served in the Peace Corps and recently passed away. see more

    It's no surprise that members of the Peace Corps community possess and develop a wide range of skills and talents. Among those who recently passed away, we honor founders of humanitarian organizations, teachers of English around the world, and individuals committed to vocations ranging from music to herpetology.


    Vincent H. Beckman III devoted his distinguished law career to enabling social justice. Vincent received a bachelor of arts from Notre Dame University, a masters in Sociology from the University of Chicago, and a juris doctorate from Northwestern University. As a Peace Corps Volunteer in Peru from 1966-1968, he helped organize community development projects. Later, he worked with the Office of Economic Opportunity (OEO) in Puerto Rico, and as a VISTA Volunteer. In 1970, Vincent served in Peru helping with earthquake relief. Upon return to Chicago, Vince taught ESL classes at Chicago City Colleges and taught sociology at YMCA Community College. While in law school, he worked at the Northwestern Legal Clinic. He joined the firm of Zeitlin & Schwab, and worked with Legal Aid Foundation Chicago (LAF) as a staff attorney in the Migrant Project. He accepted a position as Executive Director of Michigan Migrant Legal Assistance Project then returned to LAF as Supervisory Attorney of the Migrant Project. After leaving state employment, he continued this service by co-founding a nonprofit called Farmworker and Landscaper Advocacy Project, aka FLAP (Ayuda para Trabajadores del Campo y Jardineros). 


    Robert Taylor (1941-2019) served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Colombia and Brazil and was an accomplished musician. Robert graduated from Grinell College with a major in music. While there, he was also active in theater. Throughout his life, Robert was always a musician: trombonist, composer, arranger, a player in groups big and small. Jazz became his first love in high school. At Grinnell College he played in a group led by the great Herbie Hancock. While serving in the Peace Corps, he learned from the Latin jazz musicians with whom he lived and played. Once back in the States, he did graduate work in ethnomusicology, first at Wesleyan, then at Indiana University. From there it was the hardscrabble life of a musician, ready to play what was set before him: in a band that backed Motown groups (Temptations, Supremes, Spinners, Four Tops); on tour with Broadway show companies (Fiddler on the Roof, Company, No No Nanette, Seesaw); summers in the Catskills (Grossinger's and the Deville) and at the Grand Hotel on Mackinac Island; in Grand Rapids with the Bruce Early Big Band, the Grand Rapids Jazz Orchestra, and the Midtown Horns; and, showing again his versatility, as part of a brass choir for the Roman Catholic Bishop of Grand Rapids. When he settled into a “day job,” he taught Spanish and TEFL at Grand Rapids Community College.


    Terese (Schirmer) Piccoli (1929-2019) was an international traveler for many of her 90 years. She had a self-professed "awakening to feminism" in the 1960s while being a wife and mother to seven children, and soon became politically active. In 1977 Terese earned a masters in public administration from the University of Pittsburgh. She co-founded MC Consultants, a management consultant group supporting small businesses, especially those run by women and people of color. In 1990, at the age of 61, Terese was among the first Peace Corps volunteers to serve as teachers in then Czechoslovakia. After three years in Prague at Charles University, she taught for a summer in Egypt, then for a year at the Universitas Katolik in Bandung, Indonesia. From there, she taught in Hohhot, China, at the Inner Mongolia Polytechnic University, in Pohnpei at the College of Micronesia, and for a year in Ghana with the International Foundation for Education and Self-Help/Teachers for Africa Program.


    Benjamin "Ben" Edison Trumble (1956-2019) was a world traveler and said to be most-likely-to-sneak-a-snake-on-a-plane. An avid herpetologist, Ben worked at the Bronx Zoo before serving with the Peace Corps, where he worked in agricultural sectors on the coastal villages outside Tela, Honduras. Back in the U.S., Ben established his lifelong connections to zoos and circuses, as later documented in his A Mudshow Season blog, where he traveled for several seasons as an assistant manager for Carson & Barnes, Culpepper & Merriweather, and Kelly Miller, the big three of America's surviving tent circuses. In 1994, Ben settled in California where he became an Internet pioneer, helping to set up Sports Illustrated's website and producing live internet events for the Sci-Fi Channel and People Magazine.
     


    Van Roy Southworth (1949-2019) will be remembered for his irreverent humor, his unwavering optimism, and his open heart. Van's love for international service was born when he served in the Peace Corps in Ethiopia after college graduation. He earned a bachelor of arts in economics from Washington State University in 1971, and was a member of Phi Beta Kappa. Upon returning from the Peace Corps, Roy earned a masters and doctorate from the Food Research Institute at Stanford University. Following a brief research stint in Ghana, Roy accepted a role at the World Bank in Washington, D.C. where he spent the remaining 29 years of his career. While at the World Bank, he lived and worked in Tanzania and Croatia, before ultimately retiring in the country of Georgia in 2008. Roy and his wife Cathy, along with a local partner in Georgia, co-founded The McLain Association for Children (MAC), benefiting vulnerable children and adults in Georgia. As country manager for the World Bank, Roy was instrumental in founding ISET, an economic university in Tbilisi.


    Richard James Sands (1943-2019) was a Peace Corps Volunteer who taught English in Eritrea from 1965-1967. He was a graduate of St. Thomas University and the University of Minnesota Law School. In 1964, he did research in India with the Student Project for Amity among Nations (SPAN). After law school, he worked as a Minnesota Senate Counsel, then with the firm of Peterson, Popovich, Knutson & Flynn, and later in his own private practice. In St. Paul, he became a Senior Revisor of Statutes at the Minnesota Legislature, where he helped write and edit many laws on education and governance. He was particularly proud of his major project to make all Minnesota statutes gender neutral. He loved books and had a large collection on writing style, biographies, golfing, theology, and American literature. In retirement, he got a certificate in Teaching of English as a Foreign Language, and taught briefly in Italy.

       

    Below is our In Memoriam list for members of the Peace Corps community who recently passed away:

      

    PEACE CORPS STAFF

    Ann Michael Mathews, 7/12/19

     

    MULTIPLE COUNTRIES

    Braxton Luther Combs (Morocco; Tunisia), 8/19/19

    Jane Lindsey (Thailand; Sri Lanka; Belize), 7/31/19

    Josef Stagg (Dominican Republic; Sierra Leone), 8/6/19

    Robert Taylor (Brazil; Colombia) 8/19/19

     

    CZECH REPUBLIC

    Terese (Schirmer) Piccoli (1990-1993), 7/26/19

     

    ECUADOR

    Carol Beal (1963-1965), 8/9/19

     

    ETHIOPIA

    Richard James Sands (Eritrea 1965-1967), 7/29/19

    Van Roy Southworth, 7/23/19

     

    HONDURAS

    Benjamin Edison "Ben" Trumble, 8/18/19

     

    INDIA

    Virginia Bodner, 8/5/19

    Wallace Edward Tyner (1966-1968), posted 8/25/19

     

    MACEDONIA

    Jessica Nguyen Davidson, 8/5/19

     

    MALAYSIA

    Daniel Joseph "Jay" Glenney IV, 8/16/19

    Vernon Madison (staff), 7/30/19

     

    MOROCCO

    Thomas Frank Woolley, 7/19/19

     

    NIGER

    Joey Jeter, posted 8/21/19

     

    NIGERIA

    Jean Elizabeth Boyd (1966-1968), 8/1/19

    James McNamara (staff 1966-1968), 8/10/19

     

    PANAMA

    Raymond Wyss Neiger (1963-1965), 7/28/19

     

    PERU

    Vincent H. Beckman III (1966-1968; 1970), 7/24/19

     

    PHILIPPINES

    Nicole O'Brien Stone, 7/26/19

     

    SENEGAL

    Gary Engelberg (1965-1967), posted 8/19

     

    SLOVAK REPUBLIC

    Norma McCarroll Hacker (1996-1998), 8/3/19

     

    THE GAMBIA

    Michelle Lyon (1986-1988), posted 8/4/19

     

    TUNISIA

    Roger H. Evans (1968-1970), 8/8/19

     

    VENEZUELA

    Judith Ann Morhar (1966-1969), 6/8/19

     

    COUNTRY OF SERVICE NOT SPECIFIED

    John Alec Morgan, 8/8/19

     

     

     

     

    If you have information you would like to share for our monthly In Memoriam post, contact obituary@peacecorpsconnect.org.

    Thanks to Betty Pyle for her assistance in preparing this month's In Memoriam page.

  • Jonathan Pearson posted an article
    We honor members of the Peace Corps community who recently passed away. see more

    This month, we honor members of the Peace Corps community who have died, and also mourn the deaths of two serving volunteers who made the ultimate sacrifice while serving their nation.

     

    Alan Hale died at age 80 following a bicycle accident in the Philippines where he was serving as a Volunteer in Southern Leyete province. He was working with local officials on waste management issues, conducting trainings for more than 2,000 people to address issues ranging from trash burning to littering. Alan was on his second tour of duty as a Peace Corps Response Volunteer, having begun his Philippines service in September 2017. His first work with Peace Corps actually began five decades earlier, when he worked as a training officer in Puerto Rico for three years in the 1960's. A longtime resident of Bellefontaine, Ohio, Alan played a key role in the development and expansion of the Logan County Solid Waste District. He also served his community as a former assistant Logan County prosecutor. He was an active member of Kiwanis International and Toastmasters International, and served on a number of boards, including the Logan County Art League.

     

    Donovan Gregg of Beaverton, Oregon, was also on his second tour of Peace Corps service when he died following a July 23rd motor vehicle accident in Rwanda. Working as a Peace Corps Response Volunteer with his wife Jessica, Donovan was serving at a university in Kigali, training English teachers. The Greggs previously served as Volunteers in Ethiopia from 2014-2016. A graduate of Western Oregon University, Donovan received his TEFL-certification. He later earned a masters degree from the Willy Brandt School of Public Policy in Germany. Prior to his Peace Corps service, Donovan worked as an English teacher in South Korea, Afghanistan, and India.

     

    John Hogan's (1938-2019) Peace Corps career began with service as a Volunteer in Venezuela in 1964. As reported by John Coyne in Peace Corps Worldwide, "Hogan was one of the very few PCVs who went against Shriver’s direction and made the Peace Corps his career. He was a Volunteer in Venezuela 1964-66; Peace Corps Staff in Colombia 1966-68; Peace Corps Staff Burkina Faso 1979-82; and PC/HQ 1989-97. It was during this period in D.C. where he was briefly the Acting Director of the Agency, making him the first RPCV to hold that position in the Peace Corps".

     

    Barbara Jeanne Coulston Struble (1943-2019) earned her bachelors degree in English from San Jose State University and later completed her masters and PhD studies in archeology at the University of California-Los Angeles. Barbara’s full and fruitful life included serving as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Nigeria; an inner city school teacher of English, math and science; and a staff archeologist at sites in England, Mexico, Greece, Italy, the La Brea Tar Pits, and throughout the high deserts of Nevada and the Great Basin. Her many travels contributed to her being proficient in a half-dozen languages, including Igbo, French, Greek, and German. Other interests led Barbara to serve as a guide and counselor at Camp Curry, Yosemite, a gospel choir member, and a half-marathon runner.

     

    Neil Jay Rovner (1946-2019) became an activist in 1964, protesting the exclusion of African-Americans from the Mississippi delegation to the Democratic Convention held in Atlantic City. Neil attended Lafayette College in Pennsylvania, graduating Phi Beta Kappa in 1968. He protested the Vietnam War while at Lafayette, and chose to serve his country by volunteering for the Peace Corps, where he was assigned to Micronesia. After returning from service, he earned masters degree in education from Temple University. While teaching at a high school during the day, he attended law school at Temple University at night. After admission to the Pennsylvania bar in 1975, Neil clerked for the Honorable Glenn E. Mencer on the Commonwealth Court. Neil's practice was devoted to plaintiff's personal injury, including medical malpractice and product liability. He was recognized as one of the "Best Lawyers in America" for 20 years, and in 2013 was named a Top 100 trial lawyer by the National Trial Lawyers. In 2014, he was selected by his peers as Lawyer of the Year in the Harrisburg area. Since 2005, Neil worked to ensure the legacy of Hope Springs Farm, a day program in Hershey he created with his wife to benefit their daughter and other adults with intellectual/developmental disabilities and autism. Hope Springs Farm provides their "growers" with the meaningful experience of tending organic crops and caring for animals.

     

    George M. Kuhn's multifaceted career included volunteering in the Peace Corps at a teachers’ college in Ciechanow, Poland from 1993-1996. Decades earlier, George had served our nation as a U.S. Coast Guard radioman from 1951-1954, mainly in the Pacific. In George's professional life, his creative career included a mix of newspaper journalism, writing ads and promotional materials, teaching, and even acting. After playing a major role in a Robert Altman feature film in 1956, he studied drama, thus opening doors to acting in university and community theater, commercials, and two more feature films. George finished his masters degree in creative writing at Queens College in New York. In retirement, he wrote songs with his son Bob, and got to record "Adios Lounge” with singer Tom Waits.


      

    Below is our In Memoriam list for members of the Peace Corps community who recently passed away:

      

    PEACE CORPS STAFF

    John Hogan (Colombia 1966-1968; Burkina Faso 1979-1982; U.S. 1989-1997), 7/22/19

    Frederick William Madison Jr. (U.S. early 1960's), 6/3/19

    August Hale Vandermer (U.S. early 1960's), 4/18/19

     

    MULTIPLE COUNTRIES

    Donovan Gregg (Ethiopia 2014-2016; Rwanda 2019), 7/23/19

    James Delbert Nelson (India 1963-1965; Colombia 1969-1970), 7/8/19

    Lonny Rodgers (Somalia, Kenya 1968-1970), 3/18/19

     

    BELIZE

    Margaret Louise (Gowey) Botts (1994-1996), 6/26/19

     

    CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC

    Roberta Ann "Robbie" Hedeen (1985-1987), 7/18/19

     

    CHILE

    Joseph E. Martinez (1966-1968), 7/5/19

     

    COLOMBIA

    Don Lydic (1964-1967), 6/25/19

    William Joseph Stowe (1963-1965), 7/8/19

     

    COSTA RICA

    Linda Korich, 5/30/19

    Arne Landsberg (1964-1966), 6/30/19

     

    CZECH REPUBLIC

    Janice Swanson Moore (1993-1995), 6/13/19

     

    DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

    Tom Gittins (1967-1969), 7/16/19

     

    ECUADOR

    Rev. John Swanson Queen, 7/16/19

     

    EL SALVADOR

    Jack L. Schinstock (1970-1973), 7/10/19

     

    GABON

    Stephen McNutt, 7/5/19

     

    GUATEMALA

    Heather Knopp, 6/11/19

     

    INDIA

    Gloria Y. Katzmark (1965-1967), posted 6/30/19

     

    IRAN

    Thomas Bell Brigham (1969-1971), posted 7/10/19

    James Harold Jensen, 7/11/19

     

    JAMAICA

    Elizabeth Rose Strickland, 6/16/19

     

    MALAYSIA

    William T. Winter (1966-1968), 6/30/19

     

    MAURITANIA

    Nancy Cheryl Fink Lower (staff), 5/14/19

     

    MICRONESIA

    Neil Rovner, 7/18/19

     

    MOROCCO

    Mary Ann (Seume) Cate (1965-1967), 6/30/19

     

    NAMIBIA

    Marjorie Turner (1993-1995), 7/13/19

     

    NIGERIA

    Frank E. Brockman, 7/10/19

    Mitchell Adelbert Poling (1965-1967), 7/6/19

    Barbara Jeanne Coulston Struble (1965-1967), 6/13/19

     

    OMAN

    Peggy Fender (1975-1977), 5/26/19

     

    PERU

    John Rose Dickson (1962-1964), 7/17/19

    Louis Santangelo (1967-1969), 7/18/19

     

    PHILIPPINES

    Alan Hale (2017-2019), 7/11/19

    Joan E. Landfield (1961-1962), 7/13/19

    Dennis W. Lum, 7/7/19

    Scott Rubenstein, 7/25/19

     

    POLAND

    George M. Kuhn (1993-1996), 7/12/19

     

    ROMANIA

    Jacqueline A. Stark (1992-1995), 7/3/19

     

    SAIPAN

    Judith Harriff Uherbelau (1966-1968), 6/24/19

     

    SENEGAL

    Kenneth M. Murphy (approx 1988-1991), 6/20/19

     

    SOUTH KOREA

    Ralph Victor Kaplan (1969-1971), 7/23/19

    Joseph Fink Murnan (1972-1975), 6/29/19

     

    THAILAND

    Quentin Michael Sullivan (1968-1970), 7/4/19

     

    TOGO

    James "Tyler" Dickovick, 7/1/19

     

    COUNTRY OF SERVICE NOT SPECIFIED

    Virginia Ann Sagarski-Caldwell, 3/29/19

     

     

     

     

    If you have information you would like to share for our monthly In Memoriam post, contact obituary@peacecorpsconnect.org.

    Thanks to Betty Pyle for her assistance in preparing this month's In Memoriam page.

  • Jonathan Pearson posted an article
    We remember and honor those who served in the Peace Corps and recently passed away. see more

    From Follansbee, West Virginia to Painesville, Ohio or Tacoma, Washington to Cedar Rapids, Iowa, the Peace Corps experience took some of our community members who recently passed away to places that perhaps they'd never imagined. As a recent Peace Corps campaign asked "Life is calling, how far will you go?," these RPCVs and community members answered that call to the fullest.


    Dr. Maurice “Moe” Sill (born in Follansbee, West Virginia) was one of the Peace Corps pioneers who served as the training officer for the initial group of Volunteers sent to India. From 1961-1963, he served as the first country director of the Peace Corps in Pakistan. When his family returned to the United States in 1963, Moe continued his work with the Peace Corps in Washington, D.C. for the next year. He 
    received his BS from the University of Virginia in 1945, then an MS and later a PhD (both from Penn State University). Moe and his family moved to India, where he served as an agricultural missionary for eight years. Working with India’s government as a rural life analyst, he was instrumental in establishing their Agricultural Extension Service and India Village Service. After Peace Corps, Moe worked on the U.S. “War on Poverty” program from 1964-1971. He retired from the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Marshall University in 1990. He also served his country as a U.S. Navy veteran.

     

    Will Lotter (1924-2019) joined the Peace Corps in 1965 and took his family to Malawi, where he served as deputy country director and then country director. He also served as in-country staff in Nepal. Over the past fifty years, Will and his wife Jane devoted much of their time working on social justice issues, especially for victims of Central American violence. They were co-founders of the Davis (CA) Religious Community for Sanctuary. Will was a University of California at Davis (UCD) Hall of Fame coach, a U.S. Navy aviation veteran, an inspiring professor, and a humanitarian leader. A talented athlete, he played football for Cal Berkeley in the 1949 Rose Bowl and played baseball in the 1947 College Baseball World Series. In addition to teaching, his long career included coaching football, baseball, soccer, and tennis. His awards included induction to Cal Aggie Athletic Hall of Fame and the UCD Law School Martin Luther King Jr. Lifetime Achievement Award. The City of Davis named him as recipient of their Peace and Justice Award, as well as Humanitarian of the Year.


    Muriel Ann (Pennant) Hoyt (Born in Tacoma, Washington 1930-2019) had a full, non-traditional life. She was most proud of her work fighting infectious diseases, first for the State of Oregon, and later for the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) in Atlanta. This work took her to Africa four times: with a World Vision emergency medical team in Ethiopia during famine, Somalia during civil unrest, Swaziland, and, lastly, Lesotho, where Muriel served in the Peace Corps after her retirement from the CDC. 
    She earned a BS from the University of Oregon School of Nursing, becoming a registered nurse. Muriel then worked in public health for the State of Oregon, writing rules that governed nursing homes and patient care. She later earned a Master of Public Administration degree from Portland State University.


    Dr. James (Jim) McNitt returned to Africa as a teacher at the University of Malawi after serving as a Peace Corps Volunteer in the early 1970's. Jim earned degrees from Cornell University, the University of Wisconsin, and Colorado State. In the U.S., he was an Animal Science Professor at Southern University A&M College for 25 years before retiring in 2009. He was affectionately known as the "chicken and rabbit" professor. Jim was a also a member of the Baton Rouge Zoo, the Big River Economic and Agricultural Development Alliance, the Red Stick Farmers Market, Partners of the Americas, and Farmer-to-Farmer, where he worked alongside farmers in El Salvador and Haiti.


    Paula Cornwell Miles (Born in Painesville, Ohio 1942-2019) volunteered for the Peace Corps upon graduation and was assigned to Afghanistan, where she served in 1964-1966. After her service, Paula traveled throughout Europe. She later taught high school biology in international schools in London, Sao Paulo, and Geneva. 
    As a scientist, she worked at the United Nations Environmental Programme in Switzerland and upon return to the U.S. at the US Environmental Protection Agency. 


    Carl P. Onken (Born in Cedar Rapids, Iowa) joined the Peace Corps in 1968 after graduating from Iowa State University, where he met his future wife, Mary (Haak) Onken. He was assigned to serve in Sierra Leone. During his second year as a PCV, Mary joined him there to marry and serve together, working to help improve the schools in the rural regions of the country. Carl and Mary continued their support of education and youth programs in Sierra Leone throughout their lives. When they returned to the United States, Carl settled first in Manhattan where he completed his MBA before joining Chase Manhattan Bank, working as a Systems Analyst for over 35 years. 
    He served on the school board for Monroe-Woodbury, NY for 21 years, the Orange-Ulster BOCES School Board for 29, and the New York State School Board for 12, including two as president of the board.

      

    Below is our In Memoriam list for members of the Peace Corps community who recently passed away:

      

    PEACE CORPS STAFF

    Will Lotter (Malawi, Nepal 1965-1967), 5/19

    Dr. Maurice Lucien "Moe" Sill (India 1961; Pakistan 1961-1963; U.S. 1963-1964), 6/6/19

     

    MULTIPLE COUNTRIES

    John Francis Murphy (Tunisia 1962-63; Gabon 1963-1964), 6/9/19

     

    AFGHANISTAN

    William Kaschub, 5/19/19

    Paula Cornwell Miles (1964-1966), 3/6/19

     

    BELIZE

    Edith Lucile Torgerson (1986-1988), 5/21/19

     

    BOTSWANA

    Jackie Jacobs, 4/18/19

     

    BRAZIL

    John J. Cassidy (1968-1971), 6/6/19

     

    BURKINA FASO

    Gerald J. Hof (1973-1975), 6/1/19

     

    COLOMBIA

    Dr. Merrilee Cunningham (1967-1969), 6/2/19

    Andrew Nelson Fiori, 5/19

     

    COTE D'IVOIRE

    June Rose Crawford (1996-1998), 6/3/19

     

    DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

    Phyllis P. Rzewnicki, 6/12/19

     

    ECUADOR

    John Bowland (1968-1969), 5/31/19

    Patricia Valentine Roy, 6/4/19

     

    EL SALVADOR

    Tito Campos, 6/2/19

     

    ETHIOPIA

    Branden Michael Hamel (2018), 5/13/19

    John Terrence "Terry" O'Herron (1962-1964), 6/1/19

     

    FIJI

    Kent Hinnart, 5/21/19

     

    INDIA

    Linda S. Lonsdale (1968-1970), 5/30/19

     

    JAMAICA

    Bruce K. Bellin, 5/2/19

    Mary Helen Cameron (2004-2006), 6/13/19

    Thomas R. "Rom" Chevraux, 5/18/19

     

    KAZAKHSTAN

    Joan Z. Himmelhoch, 6/20/19

     

    KENYA

    Bethany Ann Tomala (2001-2003), 4/19/19

     

    LESOTHO

    Muriel Ann (Pennant) Hoyt, 6/16/19

     

    LIBERIA

    Lonny V. Main, 4/27/19

     

    NIGERIA

    Michael E. Colbert, 1/8/19

     

    PERU

    John Walter Harden (1968), 6/15/19

     

    PHILIPPINES

    Donna J. Hess (1966-1969), 6/16/19

    Ellen Jeronimo (1961-1963), 5/19/19

     

    POLAND

    Pamela Wells Hanson (1991), 6/11/19

     

    ROMANIA

    Michael G. "Mike" Rae, 5/6/19

    Richard Logsdon Young, 5/28/19

     

    SAINT LUCIA

    Gilbert Martin Makus, 3/17/19

     

    SAMOA

    Mary Alice Batchelor (1993-1995), 6/21/19

     

    SIERRA LEONE

    Carl P. Onken (1968-1970), 6/6/19

    Larry Wayne Square, 5/31/19

     

    SWAZILAND

    Dr. James McNitt (1971-1973), 5/22/19

     

    THAILAND

    Carol (Price) McLean (1983-1985), 6/9/19

    Michael Joseph Sinsko (1965-1967), 5/22/19

    Leila McKimmon Webster (1974-1976), 5/22/19

     

    TURKEY

    Robert Kennedy McBride (1965-1967), 5/20/19

     

    VENEZUELA

    John Sanbrailo, 4/20/19

     

    COUNTRY OF SERVICE NOT SPECIFIED

    Thomas Lawrence Minnis, 5/10/19

    Ronald Pletcher, 6/1/19

     

     

     

     

    If you have information you would like to share for our monthly In Memoriam post, contact obituary@peacecorpsconnect.org.

     

    Thanks to Betty Pyle for her assistance in preparing this month's In Memoriam page.

  • Jonathan Pearson posted an article
    We honor members of our community who recently died. see more

    We mourn the loss of Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Chelsea Decaminada, who died from injuries sustained during recent terrorist attacks in Sri Lanka. We also honor community leaders whose service impacted so many lives, both here in the United States and abroad.

     

    Chelsea Decaminada, an international program specialist on assignment for the U.S. Department of Commerce, died May 4 due to injuries she sustained during terrorist bombing attacks on Sri Lankan churches and hotels on Easter Sunday. “Chelsea devoted her life to public service, and her dedication and spirit were a model for all of us at Commerce,” said Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross. After Chelsea earned her bachelor's degree from Duke in 2015, she became a Peace Corps Volunteer in Tanzania. She was fluent in French and Swahili. U.S. Ambassador Alaina Teplitz posted about Decaminada: “We pay tribute to Chelsea—and all those lost and injured—by partnering with Sri Lanka and nations around the world to bring unity in the face of terrorism."

     

    Rodolfo Mendez (1945-2019) danced in New York City after his high school training in ballet, flamenco, and folkloric dance, but his Peace Corps service in Costa Rica (1966-68) profoundly affected his path to Austin, Texas, where he founded the trailblazing Ballet East Dance Company. Rudy was inducted into the Austin Arts Hall of Fame in 2006. In 2004, the National Endowment for the Arts honored Ballet East for its Dare to Dance program. East Austin nonprofit People Organized in Defense of Earth and Her Resources (PODER) honored Mendez with the Cesar E. Chavez “Sí Se Puede!” Award for his commitment and dedication to the community. Other honors included the Award of Excellence from the Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center, as well as being named one of Austin’s Trailblazers by the Austin History Center.

     

    Kathy Sue Kasprisin (1954-2019) lived a life of service, impact, adventure, inspiration, and love. Kathy earned a bachelor's degree from Auburn University, a master's degree in International Development from the School for International Training, and was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship through the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs and Latin American Studies. Her commitment to service began as a Peace Corps Volunteer in El Salvador from 1977-79. She returned briefly to the United States to lead initiatives for FEMA, Planned Parenthood, and Proyecto Libertad. In 1985, Kathy returned to El Salvador as a Program Officer for Save the Children during negotiated peace breaks between the Salvadoran military and FMLN forces. The United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) recruited her to serve as Deputy Commissioner in Belize from 1989-1993. Kathy was an especially accomplished triathlete, but, while swimming off the coast of San Pedro, Belize she was struck by a motorboat in 1993. Despite profound mobility and speech impairment following the accident, Kathy went on to serve as a VISTA volunteer in Austin, Texas, Commissioner for the Austin Mayor's Committee for Persons with Disabilities, Board Member for the Returned Peace Corps Volunteers, and a Consultant for the Johnson Scholarship Foundation.  

     

    Lourdes Maria Monserrat (1947-2019) was born in Havana, Cuba, where she excelled in swimming and represented Cuba in the Pan-American games in Chicago in 1959. At the time of the Cuban Revolution, Lourdes and her family were forced to leave Cuba and eventually settled in Albuquerque, where they built a new life in New Mexico. Lourdes graduated Summa Cum Laude from the University of Albuquerque. Lourdes and her brother Bernardo served as Peace Corps Volunteers in Honduras. After a second stint with Peace Corps in Africa, Lourdes returned to New Mexico. She moved to a ranch in Santa Fe, where she adopted foster children, became a Big Sister, started a summer camp, volunteered at an animal shelter, and became a member of the Santa Fe Buddhist Center. Lourdes was an avid student of politics and public affairs. In addition to being a licensed New Mexico practicing attorney and having a master's degree, she completed all but her PhD dissertation in Latin American studies. She had a position on Governor Jerry Apodaca’s staff, and served two stints in D.C. on behalf of New Mexico.

     

    Raymond A. Willem (1936-2019) was a retired professor of mechanical engineering, champion of charitable causes, and devoted nature enthusiast. He earned his bachelor's, master's, and PhD from the University of Illinois. Ray’s teaching career spanned 35 years and 4 countries. Beginning in 1962, he taught physics, mathematics, and mechanics as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Nigeria. He later taught at the University of the Americas in Cholula, Mexico, the University of Nairobi in Kenya, and at the New Mexico State University. Some of Ray's proudest achievements included his design work on artificial hearts for IBM in 1965, and his development of micro-lens grinders for endoscopic surgery at Karl Storz Endovision from 1991-1993. He also conducted research for the U.S. Naval Laboratory in Washington, D.C., and for NASA at the White Sands Test Facility near Las Cruces, New Mexico. 

     

    Barbara Jean Keegan (1941-2019) was born and raised in Montana, attending Eastern Montana College and then began teaching in the towns of Sydney and Hamilton. In 1966, Barbara began her Peace Corps service in Panama, where she traveled the country teaching youth and met her husband, John Keegan. The two began a family and moved to Nicaragua to help with humanitarian efforts following a devastating earthquake in 1972, only returning to America in 1977 so that their children could attend American schools. The family started a small farm in New Hampshire, and Barbara worked part time as a church secretary, bookkeeper, and librarian. She started a summer reading program for local readers and authors of all ages, taught Sunday school, served on the County Advisory Council, and formed the Boscawen Agricultural Commission.

     

    Timothy Jon Lathrop (1948-2019) completed his bachelor's degree at the University of South Florida and his master's degree at the University of Hartford. After college, both Tim and his wife Judy served in the Peace Corps in Liberia for three years, where their son Jeffrey was born. Tim taught sciences in the Nursing and Medical Schools in Monrovia, and he also established the country’s first EKG unit. He helped start the first Nursing School program and administrating JFK Hospital in Liberia. Leaving the country due to the civil war, Tim moved the family to be part of a biomedical device company, Medtronic, where he spent 31 years as a manager. Early in his retirement, Tim found a passion for walking; he walked 900 miles in Florida and completed a total of 16 Grandma's Marathons.

     

    Below is our In Memoriam list for members of the Peace Corps community who recently passed away:

      

    PEACE CORPS STAFF

    Robert Allan Brown (1964-2002), 5/3/19

    Susan Doolittle, 5/4/19

    Theodore Kroeber, 2/26/19

    Ruth Elaine Lagerberg, 4/12/19

     

    MULTIPLE COUNTRIES

    Lourdes Maria Monserrat (Honduras, unspecified country in Africa), 3/26/19

    James A. McGowen (Nigeria 1966-67; Kenya 1967-68)

    Joan Wuehler (Niger 1988-90; Lesotho), 4/19/19

     

    AFGHANISTAN

    Brigitte Broetz Hamilton (1965-67), 4/2/19

     

    BOLIVIA

    Kevin Patrick Lynch (1967-69), 3/8/19

     

    BRAZIL

    Arlene Reny Mayhugh (1964-66), 5/4/19

    Roberta F. Varner (1963-65), 1/13/19

     

    CHILE

    Helen Josephine Caspar Quistorff (1967-68), 4/20/19

     

    COSTA RICA

    Wendy Martin de Mora (served in early 70's...death reported in early 2019)

    Rodolfo "Rudy" Mendez (1966-68), 5/5/19

     

    COTE D'IVOIRE

    Nicholas Gaines Augustus IV (1970-72), 4/21/19

     

    EL SALVADOR

    Kathy Sue Kasprisin (1977-79), 4/2/19

     

    GHANA

    Helen Heard Etheridge (1988-89), 4/29/19

    Cindy Scott-Harpin (1982-85), 4/12/19

    Robert Arthur Yawin Sr. (1971-73), 4/21/19

     

    INDIA

    Burl LeRoy Reading (1962-64), 4/8/19

     

    IRAN

    Judith Dg Strohl (1962-64), 4/30/19

     

    JAMAICA

    Janet H. Sledge (1966-68), 3/6/19

     

    LIBERIA

    Timothy Jon Lathrop, 3/30/19

     

    MALAWI

    Cindy Cardenas Buecker, 4/28/19

     

    NEPAL

    Beverly Heegaard (1962-64), posted 4/29/19

    William Francis Salisbury (1991-93), 3/9/19

     

    NIGER

    Michael Donel Bettler (1967-69), 3/28/19

    Edward A. Porter (1962-64), 4/30/19

     

    NIGERIA

    Gracia Elizabeth "Hobson" Hiatt (1966-68), 10/13/18

    Margot Butterfield Siekman (1963-66), 4/16/19

    Barbara Ladi Terry (1968-70), 1/13/19

    Dr. Raymond A. Willem (1963-64), 4/11/19

     

    PALAU

    Lawrence Beauchamp Jr. (1966-69), 3/28/19

     

    PANAMA

    Barbara Jean Keegan (1966-69), 4/12/19

     

    PHILIPPINES

    Bonnie Heimbuch (1986-88), 4/16/19

     

    SENEGAL

    Patricia "Poppy" Lark (1963-65), 4/23/19

     

    SOLOMON ISLANDS

    Lawrence F. Piper (1976-78), 4/20/19

     

    SURINAME

    Bellaire Ballard Krudop (1998-2000), 8/24/18

     

    TANZANIA

    Chelsea Decaminada (2016-18), 5/4/19

     

    TURKEY

    David Bloch (1963-65), 4/14/19

     

    COUNTRY OF SERVICE NOT SPECIFIED

    Brenda Lee Chang, 3/13/19

     

     

     

     

    If you have information you would like to share for our monthly In Memoriam post, contact obituary@peacecorpsconnect.org.

  • Jonathan Pearson posted an article
    We remember those within the Peace Corps community who recently passed away. see more

    For many, Peace Corps service becomes a family affair. That was the case with a number of individuals who recently passed away.
     

    Emily Dewhirst (1929-2019) was born in Minneapolis, a descendent of Abraham Clark, a signer of the Declaration of Independence. After graduating with honors from the University of Minnesota at the age of 17, Emily bicycled through Europe on a mission to rebuild youth hostels destroyed during World War II. Emily continued her studies at the University of Paris, the Sorbonne, and  went on to become a trilingual interpreter for Fiat in Italy and then a stewardess for Pan American Airlines to fulfill her desire of extensively exploring the world. Eventually, Emily returned to America to marry and raise a family, receiving her masters from Northwestern University and becoming a French professor. Upon retirement, she and the family moved to a farm in Tennessee and raised sheep for fiber production. At the age of 82 she served in the Peace Corps at posts in Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Armenia, and Moldova, the oldest volunteer at the time. Before passing, Emily was among those establishing a residential presence in downtown Knoxville and opened a boutique called NOMAD to display and retail her international artifacts.
     

    Dave Durian (1946-2019) was known by many across the greater Baltimore region as "Morning Dave" for nearly a quarter-century. Prior to his long career in radio and television, Dave was a Peace Corps Volunteer in Micronesia. Born in Iowa, Dave earned a degree in journalism from the University of Iowa. His first job was as a weekend anchor for WOI television in Des Moines. He also worked in Rock Island Illinois, Kansas City and Pittsburgh before arriving in Baltimore in 1982. Dave was hired as a lead anchor for WBAL television, would move to Maryland Public Television, and then rejoined WBAL - this time on the radio side - in 1988. He was a radio host for the next 24 years, serving many years as the anchor for WBAL's morning drive programming. Dave retired from broadcasting in 2012. During his radio years and into retirement he was active in supporting WBAL's Kids Campaign, which raised funds for activities to provide for the betterment of young, economically deprived children in the Baltimore region.
     

    Christopher Damon Roy (1947-2019) grew up in New York City and graduated from Phillips Exeter Academy in 1965. In 1965-66 he traveled to Paris to study French and art. When his student visa expired he took a ferry to north Africa and hitchhiked from Algeria eastward to Egypt, Israel, Lebanon, and then back to Europe. Chris returned to the U.S. to study art and art history at St. Lawrence University, where he met his future wife, Nora White Leonard. After graduation in 1970, he and Nora began their service as Peace Corps volunteers in Burkina Faso. Chris received his Ph.D in art history from Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana in 1979, and began teaching African art history at The University of Iowa in 1978. For more than 40 years at The University of Iowa, his love for teaching art history and working with the Stanley Museum of Art was unquestionable. As a leader in his field, Chris founded the Project for Advanced Study of Art and Life in Africa (PASALA), which provided scholarships for graduate coursework and research in Africa, as well as conferences and publications on African art.
     

    Bernice Penney (1931-2019) was born during the Depression in 1931, which she regarded as an incredible time of unique challenge and opportunity. In 1985, she joined the Peace Corps, serving with her husband Millard in the Solomon Islands. The couple spent the years following their service traveling, eventually reaching all continents but Antarctica. This included spending five winters volunteering at the Hidden Lake Outdoor Education program in Everglades National Park. Upon her retirement in Colorado, Bernice was active in the Fort Collins Women's Chorus, Newcomers Groups, PEO, First United Methodist Church, and the Master Naturalist Program for the city.
     

    Issac "Ike" Lipowitz (1940-2019) married Andrea London after graduating with a degree in English Literature from Fairleigh Dickinson University, and together they joined the Peace Corps, serving as volunteers in Cameroon. Returning home, Ike continued his education, earning a master's degree from Syracuse University. He would move from student to teacher, accepting a position as Associate Professor of Urban Planning at the University of the District of Columbia. When he wasn't teaching, he became an avid sailor. Among surviving members of his family is his sister Harriet, who also served as a Malaysia Peace Corps Volunteer.
     

    Roland "Mac" McEldowney (1940-2019) had a love of nature early on in life, leading him to a career in exploration geology. Through the Peace Corps, Mac traveled to Ghana, working to map ore deposits for the government. During his service, he successfully reached the summit of Mt. Kilimanjaro. On his journey home from Africa, Mac met his wife and began a master’s thesis in the Baja peninsula of Mexico where he proved that the area was once under the Pacific Ocean and had been uplifted. Throughout his life, Mac began several mineral exploration companies, designed and minted coins, and redeveloped a gold ore deposit outside Ghana. In retirement, Mac took up a second career as a professional photographer of African and Native American tribes and wildlife.  

     

    Below is our In Memoriam list for members of the Peace Corps community who recently passed away:

     

    MULTIPLE COUNTRIES

    John Joseph Brown (Colombia 1964-66; Honduras Crisis Corps), 1/21/19

    Emily Ann (Hartzell) Dewhirst (Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Armenia, Moldova), 2/4/19

     

    BOLIVIA

    Irene C. Ghiz (1962-64), 1/25/18

    Jim Warfield (1966-68), 1/14/19

     

    BOTSWANA

    Ellison Lawrence Finney (1977-79), 2/16/19

     

    BURKINA FASO

    Christopher Damon Roy (1970-72), 2/10/19

     

    CHINA

    Dorothy D. Aeschliman (staff), 1/29/19

     

    COLOMBIA

    John Joseph Brown (1964-66), 1/21/19

    John Aubrey Roberts, 1/26/19

    Ricardo Wilson Grau (1963-65), 12/30/18

     

    DOMINICA

    Marie Furmanski (2000-02), 1/25/19

     

    GHANA

    Roland "Mac" McEldowney (1963-66), 2/3/19

     

    HONDURAS

    Charles Bianchi (1969-71), 6/22/18

    Will King (1978-80), 7/23/17

    Robert "Bob" Raymond (1979-80), 3/13/17

    Doug Tsitouris (1978-80), 4/17

     

    JAMAICA

    Olive Santa Scancarella, 2/6/19

     

    KAZAKHSTAN

    Edward "Ted" J. Chisholm, 2/9/19

     

    KENYA

    Stephen D. McRae, 11/24/18

     

    LIBERIA

    Wade Rucker, posted 2/2/19

    Francis Joseph Stokes III (1963-65), 1/31/19

     

    MALI

    Betty Samphier Herriman (1991-93, 1996-98)

     

    MICRONESIA

    Dave Durian, 1/28/19

     

    MOROCCO

    Isaac "Ike" Lipowitz (1964-66), 1/27/19

    Margaret Shirley (1964-66), 1/25/19

     

    NEPAL

    Albert Ely Champney (1962-64), 2/8/19

    Alan E. Dieffenbach (1964-66), posted 2/9/19

     

    NIGER

    Susan Schayes, 1/20/19

     

    NIGERIA

    Patrick B. Barry (1966-68), 6/11/18

    Donald E. Haines (1964-66), 11/18/17

    Salvatore "Jack" Magri (1963-64), 8/28/18

    Robert Michael Pugh (1966-68), 2/3/19

    Martin R. Wong (1962-64), 6/18/18

     

    PERU

    Charles Wayne Thompson (Peru 1964-66), 1/29/19

     

    PHILIPPINES

    Dr. Wilfrido "Wil" M. Baylon, 2/3/19

     

    POLAND

    Connie Benson, 2/8/19

     

    SOLOMON ISLANDS

    Bernice Penney (1985-87), 1/23/19

     

    VENEZUELA

    Henry Victor Baldi, 1/31/19

     

    YEMEN

    John Theodore Stott (1992-94), 2/16/19

     

    COUNTRY OF SERVICE NOT SPECIFIED

    Bernard LeRoy "Van" Burnham Jr. 2/6/19

    Dennis Michael Patrick Hogerty (1967-69), 2/11/19

    James C. McDermott, 1/26/19

    William Loyal White Sr., 1/30/19

     

     

     

     

    If you have information you would like to share for our monthly In Memoriam post, contact obituary@peacecorpsconnect.org

  • Jonathan Pearson posted an article
    We honor and remember those within the Peace Corps community who recently passed away. see more

    People who served in the Peace Corps realize their years as a volunteer are just the beginning. Among those members of our community who recently died are many who exemplified that lifetime commitment to serving others, whether with other Peace Corps alumni or through other organizations.

     

    David Clark Scheinman (1948-2019) led the NPCA affiliate group the Gulf Coast Council of Returned Peace Corps Volunteers, based in Houston, for many years after moving to Texas in 2004. Born in New York City, Dave attended York Suburban High School and Storm King boarding school, before attending American University and earning a graduate degree from Cornell. Dave joined the Peace Corps and served approximately four years in Nepal. Following service, he continued to work overseas, moving to Tanzania for a long career in international development consulting. 

     

    Rose J. Forney (1921 - 2018) joined the U.S. Navy WAVES in 1944 and served for two years. She later joined a group of speech pathologists and helped establish a speech therapy program for the Duval County Public Schools in Jacksonville. After eleven years of work, Rose went overseas, assigned by the U.S. Overseas Education program in 1963 to programs in Japan and Germany. It was in 1965, when her Peace Corps service began. Rose was selected to serve at a Teachers College in Malaysia, where she trained future elementary school teachers. That was just the beginning. Between the mid 1960's and the early 200's, Rose received Peace Corps assignments in eight countries. In between her many Peace Corps assignments, Rose also worked for the Bureau of Indian Affairs in New Mexico, at the William S. Tubman Institute of Medical Arts in Monrovia Liberia, and as a volunteer with the Amity Foundation at the Jiangsu Institute of Education in Nanjing China.

     

    Michael Owen Willson (1938 - 2019) was a member of the first group of volunteers to serve in Colombia. After his Peace Corps assignment in rural community development, Mike soon moved to Panama and Venezuela where he worked for Grant Advertising and later, Brown and Williamson Tobacco Company. In 1969, Mike and his family moved to Louisville. He became Advertising/Marketing Director for Kentucky Fried Chicken until his retirement in 2000. Along with his passion for the Peace Corps, Mike was also active with the Audubon Society and the Sierra Club.
     

    After coming to the United States from his native Iran, Farhad Meskoob (1975 2019) served his country in many ways. After obtaining a degree in Chinese Language from the University of Massachusetts/Amherst, Farhad was a team leader for Americorps, where he coordinated child vaccines and emergency housing. He next served in the Peace Corps in Cote D'Ivoire. Immediately following his service, Farhad worked as an executive assistant to the National Alliance on Mental Illness, facilitating both research and advocacy on the issue. Farhad went on to earn his J.D. from the Franklin Pierce School of Law, and practiced as a lawyer in Massachusetts for underrepresented, low income families. In 2013, Farhad joined the U.S. military, offering his understanding of seven distinct languages to work as a language specialist and electronic war specialist. Among his greatest achievements, Farhad trained his cadre to teach base security to the  Nigerian Military. Staff Sergeant Farhad Meskoob passed away while on assignment with the U.S. Army in San Diego.

     

    Sister Lynne Therese Elwinger (1939-2019) studied nursing at the  University of Pittsburgh, eventually graduating Magna Cum Laude. After obtaining her degree, she served for six years in the U.S. Navy, reaching the rank of Lieutenant by the end of her service. Then, Lynne went on to serve in the Peace Corps, stationed in Chile. Upon her return, she resumed her nursing career, working six years with the Indian Health Service on Sioux, Apache and Hopi Indian Reservations and more than four years on the Navajo Indian Reservation. Her work in health care also included a year-long stint with the Washington, D.C. Health Department, a year at a rural Massachusetts community health center, and eight years in various private hospitals. In 1990, Sister Lynne entered the Carmelite Monastery in Eldridge, Iowa and became the Prioress of the Monastery in 2007.
     

    Below is our In Memoriam list for members of the Peace Corps community who recently passed away:

      

    MULTIPLE COUNTRIES

    Rose J. Forney (Malaysia, Sri Lanka, Liberia, Philippines, Botswana, Thailand, Turkmenistan, China between 1963 and 2001)

    Ruth Carlson Jarvis (Fiji 1976-78; Eastern Caribbean 1979-80)

     

    BELIZE

    James W. Barry, 3/8/19

     

    BOLIVIA

    Robert Almquist (1966-68), 3/3/19

     

    BOTSWANA

    Mary M. Kisko (1990-92), 2/22/19

    Chanelle Zimmer, 2/25/19

     

    CHILE

    Sr. Lynne Therese Elwinger, OCD, 3/11/19

     

    COLOMBIA

    Paul C. Blau, 3/26/18

    Donald Jeffries Lipscomb (1963-65), 3/6/19

    Michael Owen Willson (1961-63), 3/7/19

     

    COSTA RICA

    Dr. William (Bill) Edward Schneider, 3/8/19

     

    COTE D'IVOIRE

    Ssgt.Farhad Meskoob (2001), 2/10/19

     

    DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF CONGO

    CWT "Bill" Hagelman (1972-75), 12/28/18

     

    GHANA

    Harold Richard Hanks, 2/11/19

     

    INDIA

    Stephen Michael Hattman, 2/11/19

     

    LIBERIA

    Douglas David Case (1964), 2/25/19

     

    MALAYSIA

    David Kellam Sterling (1963-65), 3/16/19

     

    NEPAL

    David Clark Scheinman (1972-76), 3/6/19

     

    NIGERIA

    Donald Austin Johnson (1962-64), 2/13/19

     

    PANAMA

    Jo Ellen Day Keating (1965-66), 3/1/19

     

    ROMANIA

    Frank Huthnance (2002-05), 1/5/19

     

    SAMOA

    Dorothy Ellen Thompson, 2/24/19

     

    SIERRA LEONE

    Mary Marcile Mashburn (1985), 12/11/18

     

    TANZANIA

    James Robinson (staff, 1966-68), 2/21/19

     

    TUNISIA

    Ellen Rose Khayat (staff), 3/8/19

     

    TURKEY

    Rosiland Aileen "Rosie" Suit, 2/23/19

     

    COUNTRY OF SERVICE NOT SPECIFIED

    Stanley Wayne Mosser, 3/10/19

    William "Bill" Poppe, 3/7/19

    Sandi Rafchiek, 2/4/19

    Nicholas Alex Zdinak, 2/17/19

     

     

     

     

    If you have information you would like to share for our monthly In Memoriam post, contact obituary@peacecorpsconnect.org

  • Jonathan Pearson posted an article
    We remember those in our community who recently passed away. see more

    We honor Returned Peace Corps Volunteers and former staff we lost in the last several weeks who served our nation so well. Among those we mourn are an administrative law judge from Washington D.C., a community leader from Arizona, and a former congressman from Wisconsin.

     

    Jim Moody (1935-2019) worked for the Peace Corps, setting up programs in Pakistan and Bangladesh, before coming back to work at Peace Corps headquarters. Moody worked for Yugoslavia and Iran for CARE, for the U.S. Agency for International Development, and served in the House of Representatives from 1983 through 1992. Congressman Moody entered politics at the state level, serving in both chambers of the state legislature. During his five terms in the U.S. House of Representatives, Moody is remembered for being one of the sponsors of a single payer universal health care system. He opposed the Persian Gulf War during the administration of George H.W. Bush, supported a constitutional amendment to balance the federal budget and was a supporter of gay rights and the legalization of marijuana. Congressman Moody left Congress after an unsuccessful bid for the Senate. He returned to teaching at the Medical College of Wisconsin and the University of Maryland. He closed his career serving as Chief Financial Officer for the United Nation's International Fund for Agricultural Development, and as president of InterAction. 

     

    Alexandra "Sandy" Keith joined the Peace Corps and served as an educator in Thailand. Sandy came back home to earn a master's degree in International Relations from the Fletcher School. She joined the State Department and returned to Southeast Asia, this time as a Foreign Service Officer at the U.S. Embassy in Saigon, Vietnam. Upon returning to the U.S., she again earned her law Degree from Georgetown. She held positions with the D.C. Corporation Office of Counsel, followed by various offices of Inspectors General. She was appointed as an administrative law judge for the government of the District of Columbia. Sandy served as an election monitor during post-war elections in Bosnia and Serbia. She was also a longtime board member of the Friends of Thailand, an NPCA affiliate group.

     

    Robert Dean "Bob" Cleary (1940-2019) became a captain in the U.S. Army Veterinary Corps in Fort Dix, New Jersey from 1964-66. He moved with his family to Menomonie, Wisconsin, where he continued a three decade career in veterinary medicine. While injuries forced the end of his practice, Bob was able to continue service as a volunteer, first in 2000 as an animal production specialist with the Peace Corps in Cajabamba, Ecuador. From there, he assisted the U.S. Department of Agriculture on projects in California and England, worked with the American Veterinary Medicine Association on a project in Mexico, and served in the Farmer to Farmer program in Guatemala. Along with assignments around the world, Bob was an active volunteer stateside, working with the American Red Cross on hurricane relief, AARP as a tax preparation volunteer, a GED math-tutor, and the Menomonie Veteran's Honor Guard. Bob served on a number of boards in Dunn County, including the County Electric Cooperative, the local Chamber of Commerce, and branches of the American Heart Association and the American Cancer Society.

     

    Jean Wooten Stewart (1925-2019) lived most of her life in Arizona. She attended Glendale Community College, Arizona State University, and Northern Arizona University. Jean taught at the San Carlos Apache Reservation, then enlisted in the Peace Corps in the Philippines before retiring and eventually serving as President of the Buckeye Valley Literacy Association. Jean spent the remainder of her life helping others: she co-founded the Southwest Volunteers Services and was a member of Estrella Toastmasters Club, Maricopa County United Way, the Southwest Community Way, and Three Rivers Historical Society among others. Jean studied and taught art throughout her life, as well as being a prolific writer, publishing her final book entitled “Peace Corps @ 62” this year.

     

    Brenda Rodgers (1937-2019) was born in St. Louis, and worked as a dental assistant before obtaining a degree in dental hygiene. She enlisted in the Peace Corps, where she served in the slums of Rio de Janeiro and worked to improve women’s role in society. Upon returning to the U.S., Brenda obtained a graduate degree in Public Health and went to war-torn Vietnam to work as the Public Health advisor to the Mayor of Saigon, where she met her husband. Brenda spent the following 17 years traveling the world with her military husband, taking positions in Korea and Alaska. In retirement, she focused on writing, having many of her pieces printed in both American and Vietnamese magazines.

     

    Thomas Redyard Wilson (1941-2019) knew he wanted to be  an architect from a young age. Born in Tennessee, he moved to Texas to study architecture at Rice University, a passion that allowed him to express his creative side while making a difference in people's lives. After graduation, he met his wife and the two enlisted in the Peace Corps where they served together in Tunisia. Thomas worked on bringing Arabic aspects to the architecture there, where the population wanted classic “American” styles as per what they saw on TV. Returning to the United States, Thomas moved to Texas with his wife and started a family, pursuing a 50 year career as an architect in Texas, Oklahoma, and Canada. 

     

    Below is our In Memoriam list for members of the Peace Corps community who recently passed away:

      

    PEACE CORPS STAFF

    Robert B. Binswanger (1961-63), 3/16/19
    Judith E. Jones (Tunisia, Morocco), 3/13/19

    Jim Moody (Pakistan, Bangladesh), 3/22/19

    Brenda Rodgers (Brazil 1966), posted 3/31/19

     

    MULTIPLE COUNTRIES

    Catherine Julia Gantz (Philippines 1981-83; Sierra Leone 1984-85; US Staff 1986-91), 3/23/19
    Steven Edwin Jones (El Salvador 1966-68; Nicaragua 1968-69), 3/25/19

    Linna Ward Marder (Korea 1967-69; Belize 1974-76), 4/6/19

     

    ANTIGUA

    Robert L. Sutton (1980-83), 3/20/19

     

    BOLIVIA

    Hardy Jones (1966-68), 12/18

     

    BRAZIL

    Kenneth C. Mohr Sr. (1961-64), 4/14/19

     

    DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

    Richard M. "Dick" Pomeroy (1986-87), 3/16/19

     

    ECUADOR

    Robert Dean "Bob" Cleary, 4/2/19

     

    GUATEMALA

    David Charles Thompson (1971-74), 3/26/19

     

    HONDURAS

    Michael Thomas Dellinger, 4/2/19
    Rosemary K. Kastner (1977-79), 2/10/18

     

    INDIA

    Walter W. Greist, 3/25/19
    Patricia Smyers Hansmann, 2/1/19

     

    KENYA

    Pierre Hathaway (1997-99), 3/17/19

     

    MALAWI

    Bruce Ripley Clark (1964-66), 3/18/19
    Christina Burr Lahy, 4/4/19

     

    MARSHALL ISLANDS

    Larry Allen Jones (1967-69), 3/17/19

     

    MICRONESIA

    Arturo "Dennis" Montoya (1980-83), 2/17/19

     

    NEPAL

    John Battalana (1973-77), posted 4/2019
    Eric Bulmer (1994-97), 1/27/18

    Dr. Susan LaForest, 3/24/19

    Lucy Sotar (1964-65), 6/4/18

     

    NIGERIA

    Anne Windsor Beaman PsYD Ph.D. (1963-65), 3/27/19

     

    PHILIPPINES

    Charles Verne Parham, 3/27/19

     

    SOLOMON ISLANDS

    Bruce E. Ferguson (1972-75), 3/23/19

     

    THAILAND

    Alexandra "Sandy" Keith (1965-67), 4/10/19

     

    TUNISIA

    Thomas Redyard Wilson, 3/25/19

     

    TURKEY

    Joan Montez Phillips, 3/20/19
    William Taylor, 11/21/18

     

    YEMEN

    Carol Borge Reitz (1976-78), 4/13/19

     

    COUNTRY OF SERVICE NOT SPECIFIED

    Patrick Hughes Hetrick, 3/26/19

     

     

     

     

    If you have information you would like to share for our monthly In Memoriam post, contact obituary@peacecorpsconnect.org.

  • Jonathan Pearson posted an article
    We remember Peace Corps community members who recently passed away see more

    As 2018 comes to a close, we celebrate the lives of members of the Peace Corps community who recently passed away.

     

    Educator. Public Servant. Activist. Charles "Chuck" Hitchcock (1939-2018) took on many important roles during his life. After graduating from Colgate University, Chuck served his country as an early member of the Peace Corps, serving in Bangladesh. After returning home he continued his studies, earning a masters in community studies and human relations at New York University, and a doctorate from Union graduate school. His dissertation on psychiatric attitudes towards homosexuality helped prompt the American Psychiatric Association to discontinue classifying homosexuality as being a disease. Chuck was a founder of Long Island's East End Gay Organization, which would grow to nearly 1,000 members. Over time, the group raised 100 thousand dollars to support AIDS research. From 1981- 83, Chuck served on the National Gay Task Force. A resident of East Hampton, Chuck served his community. He was chairman of the town Zoning Board of Appeals, was on the town preservation advisory committee, was a member of the Springs School Board and board director of The Retreat, a domestic violence agency. Chuck taught sociology at Southampton College for 35 years, and was dean of the college for five years. In 1999, he received the school's David Newton Teaching Excellence Award.

     

    He was the first country director in Turkey. Prior to his Peace Corps service, David N. Weinman (1934-2018) served three years as an officer in the U.S. Navy and attended the University of Michigan Law School. From 1962 to 1967, Dave's leadership with Peace Corps' Turkey program saw the number of volunteers increase from 39 to just under 500. Dave continued his public service following Peace Corps, holding leadership positions with the Office of Economic Opportunity, the Department of Health, Education and Welfare, and the Office of Management and Budget. He was part of a team of specialists that helped shape and establish the U.S. Department of Education. After this impressive career in government, Dave started his own business, Ombud Inc., a service organization providing college advisory, mediation and consultation services.

     

    Known to most as "Hal", David Harold Averett (1949-2018) was a huge contributor to communities all over the world. Hal grew up in Georgia, attending Georgia Tech to study architecture and later graduating from the University of Georgia. After receiving his degree, he went abroad with the Peace Corps, serving in Central and South American countries. After quite a few years, he went back to his home in Georgia and started his own building firm, D. Hal Averett Contracting, Inc. He got himself involved in as many things as he could. He was a significant member  in many community organizations and projects. Some of these include things like Columbus Scholars, Safe House, Trinity House, Open Door Community, VIP, IFM, Trees Columbus and many, many more. He played a major influential role in the Riverdale-Porterdale Cemetery Foundation. Hal was also involved in a variety of church affiliated committees and organizations. Mr. Averett absolutely loved his community and many others as well. His commitment to helping others reached around the entire world, from Central America to South America and beyond.

     

    He devoted much of his life to public service, with a focus on land preservation. But first, and soon after marrying his college sweetheart, James Clifton Crain (1946-2018) and his wife Carol left Iowa State University and joined the Peace Corps, serving in Guatemala. Following their service, they moved to New Mexico where James secured his master's degree in public administration from the University of New Mexico. James was hired by the city of Albuquerque, where he purchased land for open space, easements and parks. The next stop was Colorado. After a short stint with the city of Lakewood, James settled into the position of Open Space Director for the city of Boulder. During his 23 years in this role, the acres of protected land nearly quadrupled, from 9,200 to more than 34,000 acres. For these efforts, a plaque in Boulder honors James' work to protect and preserve the beauty of Colorado's Front Range. He won a number of awards, including the 2000 and 2001 Colorado Coalition of Land Trusts Award of Excellence, and the 2007 Outstanding Individual Achievement award from the Colorado Open Space Alliance.

     

    Soon after graduating from the Mt. Auburn School of Nursing in 1963, Catherine O'Brien-Haskell (1943-2018) joined the Peace Corps, serving in Malaysia. She went back to school following her service, attaining a BS in Nursing from the University of New Hampshire. Catherine worked in various capacities in the Boston area, including the Visiting Nurse Association and Boston Healthcare for the Homeless. Catherine was an active volunteer in her community, supporting the Special Olympics, Salvation Army, the Unitarian Universalist Church and the Ethical Society of Boston.

     

    Below is our In Memoriam list for members of the Peace Corps community who recently passed away:

      

    PEACE CORPS STAFF

    John "David" Zielinski, 11/30/18

    MULTIPLE COUNTRIES

    Douglass Dewey (Nigeria, 1966-1967; Kenya, 1969), 10/8/18

    Jeffry Spyhalksi (Sierra Leone; Togo, 1978-1985)

    ARMENIA

    Edward Ball (2005-2007), 11/18/18

    BANGLADESH 

    Charles Hitchcock (1961-63), 10/24/18

    BOTSWANA

    Jorge Angelo Alfaro, 11/29/18

    Margaret "Margie" Snively (1991-93), 11/9/18

    COSTA RICA

    Janice Purington (1964-1966), 11/13/18

    GHANA

    Kevin John Brady, 11/16/18

    Theodore "Tom" Taylor Jr., 11/14/18

    GUATEMALA

    James Clifton Crain (1968-71), 12/9/18

    Ann Elizabeth Heffernan (1980-83), 12/12/18

    JAMAICA

    Marilyn Ruth Mitchell Jones (1991-1994), 11/24/18

    MALAYSIA

    Catherine O'Brien-Haskell (1967-69), 12/11/18

    MOROCCO

    Stephen Osborne (1968-1970), 11/23/18

    Steve Nelson, 11/24/18

    NAMIBIA

    David Christopher Berryman Merritt (2016-18), 11/14/18

    PERU
    Charles Vasquez, 10/30/18

    SENEGAL

    Julia "Judy" Gamble (1989-1992), 11/27/18

    SIERRA LEONE

    Jack Johnston (1962-64), 11/7/18

    SOUTH KOREA

    Frances Lillian Kendall (1978-1980), 11/21/18

    SWAZILAND

    Janyth Pomerville (1991-1993), 11/23/18

    TURKEY

    David N. Weinman (Country Director 1962-67), 12/15/18

    COUNTRY OF SERVICE NOT SPECIFIED

     D. Hal Averett, 11/28/18 

    Noel F. Dudley, 12/7/18

    R. Denning Gearhart (served 1973-74), 12/11/18

    Guy Manley III, 11/27/18

     

     

    If you have information you would like to share for our monthly In Memoriam post, contact obituary@peacecorpsconnect.org

     

  • Jonathan Pearson posted an article
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    It's not necessarily surprising that some of the Returned Peace Corps Volunteers (RPCVs) we recently lost continued their public service and left their mark with the Environmental Protection Agency, the (former) Department of Health, Education and Welfare, and VISTA. But there are other achievements as well. For example, the look and feel of many of our nation's iconic theme parks are the result of an RPCV. And a well-known psychologist who frequently appeared with Larry King, Phil Donahue and Oprah? You guessed it - an RPCV. 

     

    Many of our NPCA affiliate groups are represented by long-serving, outstanding leaders. Members of the Friends of Thailand (FOT) are mourning the loss of Carolyn Nickels-Cox (1947-2018), who co-founded the group in 2001 and served as its president. Carolyn joined the Peace Corps in 1971 and was assigned to Annukulnaree Girls’ School in Kalasin Province. She continued her service between 1973 and 1975, working with Thailand's Ministry of Education in Bangkok. For many years, Carolyn would make annual visits to her country-of-service and home site. During these visits, she would meet with Peace Corps staff and U.S. Embassy personnel, help with planning of the 40th, 45th and 50th anniversary celebrations of Peace Corps service in the country, and visit projects supported by FOT. Under Carolyn's stewardship, FOT members donated more than $125,000 since 2002 to support 125 community projects. This included funds for volunteer-counterpart and returned volunteer projects, and critically-needed aid in response to the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. FOT's tsunami aid included funding for the Burmese population living in southern Thailand. 

     

    Peter J. Maki (1948-2018) was born and raised on a farm in Wisconsin. He grew up raising cattle, milking them for his family’s own dairy. When he finished high school, Maki continued his education at the University of Wisconsin, where he studied mathematics and met his wife. After college, he decided to join the Peace Corps, serving two years in Bolivia with a dairy project. When he returned home, he and his wife decided to serve again, this time together as a Peace Corps team in El Salvador. Following his Peace Corps service, Peter pursued some of his many interests. He became a dairy farmer in Missouri for a period of time, but would later become a park ranger in Maui. He also went back to school at the University of Wisconsin and became a USDA loan officer. While living in Oroville California, Peter was a member of the city planning commission. He also organized farmer’s markets and helped create a Veterans Memorial. During his years of retirement in Missouri he focused his energy on behalf of environmental stewardship groups such as the Missouri Stream Team and Fuels for Schools.

     

    Fred F. Guyton Jr. (1938-2018) graduated from the University of Illinois with a degree in architecture. He received a fellowship from the Center of Inter American Housing and Planning which allowed him to go to Bogota, Colombia with the Peace Corps. He would continue serving his nation when he was inducted into the United States Army in the combat Engineer Battalion as a helicopter pilot. When he was discharged, he began his career as an architect. His most notable position was when he was Chairman at Peckham Guyton Albers & Viets Inc. Under his leadership, the firm earned both regional and national awards for outstanding designs. He helped lead projects all over North America, Europe, South America and Asia, including Busch Gardens, many SeaWorld Adventure Parks, Universal Studios Theme Parks and the Space Command Headquarters at Peterson Air Force Base in Colorado. Guyton also participated in many different architectural boards, civic groups as well as fundraising organizations. He was a trustee for the St. Louis Science Center, the President and Board member of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and was also appointed to a variety of positions by numerous St. Louis mayors. 

     

    Carl Elliott Meacham (1941-2018) is just one of the many people who dedicated their whole life to their work. Meacham graduated from Howard University and then joined the Peace Corps, serving as a volunteer in Liberia. He continued his service as an educator in the Virgin Islands for many years. When he got back to the states, Carl was hired as the director of Cooperative Education at Mary Holmes College in Mississippi. He next accepted positions to work on the staff of New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller, and then joined the US Department of Health, Education and Welfare under the Carter administration. After his many careers, he went back to school and got his PhD in political science. He was a professor at the University of New York - Oneonta, and also taught at the University of New York - Albany and Cornell University.  Carl had many pieces of his work published in prestigious journals. His research focused mostly on Latin American demographic shifts in public policies.

     

    Coming out of high school, Dr. Dwight D. Roper (1937-2018) enlisted in the Army and was stationed in Berlin, Germany. When he came home, he went to college in Arkansas and then joined the Peace Corps, serving on a small island in the Philippines as an elementary school teacher. Upon his return, he decided to go back to school again and started working for the federal government and with the Volunteers in Service to America (VISTA) and other programs. This allowed him to travel around the country. Eventually he settled down and started a family, all the while pursuing his PhD at Stanford University. He had extensive knowledge on history, literature and theology and much of his work was published in academic journals and magazines.

     

    After two years of Peace Corps service in Somalia in the late 1960's, Karen Shanor (1943-2018) was hired by the agency to work as a consultant psychologist. It is said Peace Corps was a critical touch point for her career, as she became a champion for understanding diverse perspectives. In the early 1970's, Karen completed her Ph.D in psychology from the United States International University in San Diego. After moving to Washington DC, Karen began a private practice and received much attention and acclaim for her 1978 book, "The Shanor Study." For five years, she hosted a program on WRC radio. That would lead to television from the early 1980's through the 1990's. She hosted a regular psychology show on the ABC/Hearst Cable Network, and became a regular guest on programs hosted by Oprah Winfrey, Charlie Rose and Phil Donahue. She was a member of the Georgetown University Department of Psychology from the early 2000's through 2015. She also served as a White House consultant and served on several prestigious professional boards and associations.

     

    Below is our In Memoriam list for members of the Peace Corps community who recently passed away:

      

    PEACE CORPS STAFF

    Liduvina "Lido" Caserta, 9/23/18

    MULTIPLE COUNTRIES

    Florence Sumire Griffen (Ecuador; Thailand), 9/4/18

    Philip Matheson Janes (India 1963-1965; Southeast Asia 1965-1967), 9/22/18

    Peter J. Maki (Bolivia 1969-1971; El Salvador 1971-1973), 9/9/18

    Rev. Lafayette Seymour (Pakistan Vol. 1962-64; Nigeria staff 1966-68 and India staff 1968-71) 8/18/18

    AFGHANISTAN 

    David Moskowitz (1964-1966), 9/8/18

    BANGLADESH

    Charles A. Herron, 9/28/18

    BELIZE

    Sara L. Wittenberg, 8/25/18

    BRAZIL

    Richard John Axelson, 10/11/18

    COLOMBIA

    Fred F. Guyton Jr. (1961-1962), 9/28/18

    Charles Gordon Perry III, 10/4/18

    COSTA RICA

    Terry Lee LeMahieu (1986-1988), 9/30/18

    FIJI

    Roger S. Whitley (1984-1986), 10/4/18

    GHANA

    Marcia Spink, 9/28/18

    IRAN

    Mary Janice Davis, (1966-1968) 10/8/18

    JAMAICA

    Bertil Merland "Bert" Dahlman, 10/4/18

    LIBERIA

    Ruth Jacobson (1971-1974), 9/17/18

    Carl Elliott Meacham, 9/2/18

    NAMIBIA

    Teresa Ann Heger, 10/8/18

    NEPAL

    William "Bill" Durdan (1964-1966), 10/5/18

    PANAMA

    Kevin Lewis Webb, 9/22/18

    PHILIPPINES

    Barbara A. Crumbaker Teves (1961), 10/2018

    Dwight D. Roper (1962-1964), 10/3/18

    SAIPAN

    Sara "Sally" Porter (1966-1968), 9/15/18

    SAMOA

    Larry Jude Lopes (2006-2007), 9/26/18

    SOMALIA

    Karen Shanor (1967-69), 7/27/18

    SWAZILAND

    James Stephen Hank (1968-1970), 10/5/18

    Michael W. Mertz (1969-1970), 9/20/18 

    THAILAND

    Carolyn Nickels-Cox (1971-75), 9/25/18

    THE GAMBIA

    Gavin Gladding (1998-2000), 9/16/18 

    VIETNAM

    Dennis P. Nash, 10/1/18

    COUNTRY OF SERVICE NOT SPECIFIED

    Samuel Walter Denton, 8/8/18

    Norman Howard, 9/17/18

     

  • Jonathan Pearson posted an article
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    As the Peace Corps mourns the recent deaths of Togo volunteer Jonathan Mitchell and Namibia trainee Mitchell Herrmann, we also remember the passing of numerous talented and inspiring individuals, including one of the beloved icons of Peace Corps' formative years.

     

    While best known for co-founding a leading organization devoted to development on the African continent, C. Payne Lucas (1933-2018) was first a leading figure in the early days of the Peace Corps. A graduate of the University of Maryland - Eastern Shore and American University, Lucas served in the Air Force and served on the Democratic National Committee. Not long after the formation of the Peace Corps, Lucas was hired. His work with the agency began as a field representative in Togo. He would go on to serve as a country director in Niger, regional director for Africa and director of the office of returned volunteers. In 1971, Lucas helped launch Africare, the largest African-American non profit organization focusing on African development. At the time of his 2002 retirement, the organization had distributed $400 million to 27 nations to combat poverty and drought, advance agriculture and address the HIV/AIDS crisis.

     

    There are many varied roles played by Peace Corps volunteers throughout history. But how many can say their assignment included conducting the national symphony? That was the case for Gerald "Jerry" Brown during his service in Bolivia during the late 1960's. Jerry attended Arizona State University on a French Horn scholarship. He would also become a skilled pianist and harpsichordist. After graduating from ASU, Jerry performed with the Phoenix symphony and would study conducting at Julliard. During his five years of Peace Corps service, Jerry became the principal conductor of Bolivia's National Symphony. This led to a long post-Peace Corps period of teaching and conducting across Latin America. Jerry spent many years leading the Costa Rica National Symphony and helped create that country's national youth symphony and youth music program.   

     

    Rabbi Rachel Cowan (1941-2018) is being remembered as a pioneer in the Jewish healing movement. After her marriage to writer and author Paul Cowan in the mid-1960's, the couple traveled to Mississippi to participate in the registration of black voters, and soon after joined the Peace Corps, serving in Ecuador. Following her husband's death, Cowan in 1990 became one of the co-founders of the Jewish Healing Center, established to provide spiritual resources and wisdom to help people deal with suffering that surrounds personal loss and personal illness. Rabbi Cowan would next move on to the Nathan Cummings Foundation, serving 14 years as director of the center's Jewish Life and Values program. She also worked at the Institute for Jewish Spirituality in Manhattan.

     

    The social justice organization Empower Missouri is nearly 120 years old. For 25 of those years, the organization (formerly known as the Missouri Association for Social Welfare - MSW) was led by Peter Salvatore De Simone (1937-2018). Trained initially as a civil engineer, Peter was among the first wave of Peace Corps Volunteers, serving in Tanzania beginning in 1961. After Peace Corps, Peter's commitment to national service continued with a stint working for Volunteers in Service to America (VISTA). It was in 1977, when Peter was hired to lead MSW. During his tenure, the agency contributed to the establishment of the Missouri Foundation for Health and the Housing Trust Fund. In 1995, the Ethical Society of St. Louis awarded Peter with the Humanist of the Year Award for his lifetime commitment to social justice. 

     

    Soon after graduating from the University of Washington in 1965, Barbara Bailey (1943-2018) joined the Peace Corps, serving as a volunteer in Turkey. After returning from service, Barbara became a caseworker with the Washington juvenile justice system. A trip to Sun Valley, Idaho to take time off would lead to a major career shift. In between skiing, hunting and softball, Barbara took a job clerking at the Ex Libris bookstore. Her interest in books led her to soon purchase the store. In 1977, Barbara would return to Seattle, where she opened the B. Bailey Bookstore. In 1982 she co-founded Bailey Coy Books. This store became a magnet for bookstores and authors. The store also became a gathering place for Seattle's LGBTQ community. Barbara became a founding board member of Seattle's Pride Foundation, now the largest community foundation of its kind in the country. She also served on the national board of Lambda Legal. After selling her bookstores, Barbara returned to her family home in Chevy Chase, near Port Townsend. Along with her family, Barbara expaned a nearby golf course and established Chevy Chase Cabins, a popular resort on Discovery Bay.

     

    Dr. David S. Smith Jr. (1943-2018) was a man of many interests. After graduating from the University of Washington with a degree in finance, he found himself doing volunteer work in Colombia for the Peace Corps. After his three years of service, he returned to the states and got a job with the Sea Land Corporation. Not long after that, David went back to school to become a doctor. His medical education and training took him to Mexico, New Jersey and Illinois. At the age of 40 he began his practice at a clinic in Delaware, Ohio. When he wasn't working in the clinic, David spent much of his time doing community service. He worked with organizations such as the Delaware County Chapter Central Ohio Diabetes Association, the Delaware County Easter Seal Society, Big Brothers/Big Sisters and Habitat for Humanity. Even after he retired, he continued his work as a volunteer physician and went on many medical mission trips to New Zealand, Honduras and Haiti.Throughout his career, David was recognized for much of his work. He was selected as one of the recipients for the Outstanding Young Men of America Award back in 1971 and was more recently honored by the Ohio Academy of Family Physicians as its 2005 Physician of the Year. He also received the Rotary Club Paul Harris award and the Delaware Area Chamber of Commerce Wayne Hillbom Lifetime Achievement Award alongside his wife Dolores.

     

    Below is our In Memoriam list for members of the Peace Corps community who recently passed away:

     

    STAFF

    David Danielson, 8/27/18

    Bonnie Daniels Gardner, 8/10/18

    C. Payne Lucas, 9/15/18

    MULTIPLE COUNTRIES

    Phyllis Jean Inman (Belize 1985-87; Nepal 1991-94), 8/28/18

    Michael Weintraub M.D. (Guinea, Togo 1966-68)

    BOLIVIA

    Gerald "Jerry" Brown (1966-71), 8/12/18

    Bevin Smith McCarthy, 8/13/18

    CHILE

    Peter J. Murray, 8/22/18

    COLOMBIA

    William Cornwell (1962-64), 8/2/18

    C. Kermit "Kit" Ewing, 8/7/18

    Dr. David S. Smith Jr. (1966-69), 8/22/18

    Frederick F. "Buck" Thornburg, 9/19/18

    ECUADOR

    Rabbi Rachel Cowan, 8/31/18

    Valarie A. Furst, 8/26/18

    ETHIOPIA

    Lauren Elizabeth Laabs, 8/18/18

    HONDURAS

    Hugh "Stewart" Gregg (1962-1964), 9/5/18

    INDIA

    Lawrence T. Cerep, 8/16/18

    Joseph Michael McFarlan (1972-74), 9/15/18

    KENYA

    Alexander Reisbord (1971-73), 9/10/18

    Joyce Dee Peterson, 7/19/18

    LESOTHO

    Burch Alan Harper (1989-91), 7/10/18

    MICRONESIA

    Carol Bergner (1970-72), 9/14/18

    MOROCCO

    Dana S. Kephart (1969-71), 3/1/18

    NAMIBIA

    Mitchell Herrmann, 8/16/18

    NEPAL

    Robert Anthony Garcia, 9/13/18

    NIGER

    John David Bowling, 8/13/18

    NIGERIA

    Edward R. Pautienus (1961-64), 8/26/18

    PERU

    Hank Davenport Barberis (1962-64), 7/2/18

    PHILIPPINES

    Karen Rosalie Emerson, 9/13/18

    Jerry Poznak (1961-63), 7/18

    Richard Howard "Rik" Rodefer (1962-63), 8/18/18

    SIERRA LEONE

    Roger B. Hirschland (1965-69), 8/18/18

    Sharon Lee Milukas, 9/9/18

    SWAZILAND

    Donna Fitzpatrick Kennedy (2014-16), 6/25/18

    TANZANIA

    Peter Salvatore De Simone (1961-63), 8/30/18

    TOGO

    Jonathan Mitchell, 9/4/18

    TUNISIA

    Ronald Mahka, 8/24/18

    TURKEY

    Barbara Bailey (1965-67), 9/1/18

    COUNTRY OF SERVICE NOT SPECIFIED

    James Keith Blalock, 8/13/18

    Ronald Gary Findlay, 9/12/18

    Elizabeth "Betty" DeWolfe Hummer, 9/6/18

    Patrick Kerwin Parsons, 8/20/18

    John R. Pettit, 8/10/18

    William "Roger" Pickens Jr., 9/17/18

    George Robins, 7/29/18

    Ida Katherine Yates, posted 9/9/18

     

  • Jonathan Pearson posted an article
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    One joined the profession of her historically significant grandfather. One dedicated his life to historic preservation. One devoted her life to girls education.

    When the lives of Returned Peace Corps Volunteers fade away, remembrances bring light on their many amazing contributions. We recognize and remember the achievements of some of the members of our community we lost in recent weeks.

     

    After graduating from Radcliffe College, Alice Popkin (1928-2018) went on to graduate from Yale Law school. In pursuing a legal career, she would follow in the footsteps of her grandfather, Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis. It was also at Yale, however, where Alice joined the National Student’s Association and met fellow classmate Sargent Shriver. While Alice worked in public service law until 1987, she joined Shriver during the early days of the Peace Corps, assisting with establishing a number of Peace Corps offices and programs around the world. Continuing her commitment to public service, Alice served as special counsel to a Senate subcommittee investigating juvenile delinquency. She was later serve as Associate Administrator for International Affairs at the Environmental Protection Agency. Committed to her community of Chatham, Massachusetts, she was a trustee and five year president of the Eldredge Library and served on the Chatham Community Preservation Committee and Harbor Management Committee. She was also a Trustee at Radcliffe College.

     

    When asked when she would discontinue her overseas relief work and return to the United States, MaryJo Aerts (1985 - 2018) was reported to have replied, "When all the four million girls in Afghanistan can go to school." MaryJo was working with Catholic Relief Services (CRS) in Afghanistan and Laos at the time of her death. A graduate of the University of Wisconsin - Stevens Point and the University of Portland, MaryJo began her career in education at St. Anthony's Nativity School in Portland. She then joined the Peace Corps and served in Nicaragua. Following Peace Corps and prior to joining CRS, she spent three years teaching at the St. Augustine Prepatory School in Nicaragua. 

     

    For thirty years, Dominican Republic (1963-64) Peace Corps Volunteer Phillip Foster Brown (1937 – 2018) served our nation through the US Department of Agriculture as an agricultural economist. But those who knew him also were aware of Phillip’s longtime involvement with woodturning as a craft art. He was one of the early members of the American Association of Woodturners, helped found a chapter in Montgomery County Maryland and was honored in 2017 by the county with a Lifetime Impact Award for Excellence in the Arts and Humanities. Phillip was active in a number of other organizations devoted to the craft. His wood sculptures and bowls can be found in many private collections and nine museums, including the Smithsonian’s Renwick Gallery.

     

    It is not an exaggeration to say that Michael E. Emrick (1945 – 2018) left his mark on the city of Nashville. A graduate of Washington University in St. Louis, Michael studied and practiced architecture for fifty years, including during his service as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Malaysia. His career would eventually bring him to Tennessee, where he began in 1978 working on a master plan for the Rugby Colony. His work there would bring him national recognition. In Nashville, much of Michael’s work centered on restoration of the Germantown section of the city. There, he worked on sixty projects in forty different buildings. For this work, Nashville’s Metropolitan Historic Commission honored Michael with a Lifetime Achievement Award. Taken together, Michael worked on seven National Historic Landmarks, nineteen National Register Historic Districts and nearly one hundred National Register listed properties.

     

    The vibrant twists and turns through the life of Barbara Jean Sullivan (1944 – 2018) included Peace Corps service in Malaysia. A 1967 graduate of Mercy College, Barbara’s degree in mathematics would lead her to become one of the first computer programmers for IBM. She would later work at National Geographic, and was a small business owner with her husband. The larger world would call Barbara overseas as a Foreign Service Officer, where she served at U.S. embassies in eight different nations. Barbara’s commitment to others would continue upon retirement to Daniel Island South Carolina. She volunteered and supported organizations including Meals on Wheels, the Low Country Pregnancy Center and Hospice of Charleston.

     

    Below is our In Memoriam list for members of the Peace Corps community who recently passed away:

     

    STAFF

    Alice Popkin (1961-63), 7/18/18

    Marjorie E. McLean, 7/13/18

    MULTIPLE COUNTRIES

    Barbara Dove (Democratic Republic of Congo 1972-74; Burkina Faso 1974-76), 7/26/18

    James A. Pratt (Tunisia, Togo), 7/4/18

    CHILE

    Ward D. Belding Jr. (1964-66), 6/27/18

    COLOMBIA

    John F. Ryan (1967-69), 8/11/18

    COSTA RICA

    James E. Niles, 7/10/18

    DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

    Phillip Foster Brown (1963-64), 7/14/18

    ECUADOR

    David H. Rathbun, 8/9/18

    ETHIOPIA

    Myrna Logan (1967-69), 6/26/18

    FIJI

    Barbara Ann Lee Knutson (1990-93), 7/22/18

    GHANA

    Gwen Lee Rosser (1964-66), 7/23/18

    GUATEMALA

    Eric Woodman Rozendaal, 7/10/18

    INDIA

    Steven K. Thomas, 7/29/18

    MALAYSIA

    Michael E. Emrick, 7/3/18

    Nell Quigley McCombs (1967-69), 7/14/18

    Barbara Jean Sullivan, 7/22/18

    Carol S. Wheelock (1963-65), 8/10/18

    MICRONESIA

    Ruth Marie Duperret (1968-70), 8/6/18

    MOROCCO

    Lesta Chandler (1984-86), 7/23/18

    NICARAGUA

    MaryJo Aerts, 8/2/18

    PALAU

    Tom Blackburn (staff), 7/22/18

    PHILIPPINES

    Joanne Frances (Holland) Machmer (1962-64), 2/28/18

    SOUTH KOREA

    Edward Gignoux Jr., 7/20/18

    John L. Grant (1967-69), 7/23/18

    Joseph T. Sefcheck (1972-75), 7/10/18

    TANZANIA

    Nancy Lee O'Donnell (1966-68), 6/29/18

    THAILAND

    Roger Archie Coulombe, 2/22/18

    COUNTRY OF SERVICE NOT SPECIFIED

    Joan Cecilia Andring, 7/18/18

    Charles Henry Howe III, 7/26/18

    Myron Alexander Nachbar, 7/15/18

    Sage Douglas Remington, 7/31/18

     

     

  • Jonathan Pearson posted an article
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     Whether through the State Department, Radio Free Asia, FEMA, or the Department of Agriculture, Peace Corps was a springboard for continued service to our nation among a number of distinguished individuals we lost in recent weeks.

     

    Peace Corps Volunteer. Diplomat. Friend and supporter of the National Peace Corps Association. Service on the NPCA Board of Directors was just one of the boards Darryl Norman Johnson (1938 -2018) served on, following a long and distinguished career in the foreign service. Darryl's formal education took him across the country, from the University of Puget Sound, University of Washington, to the University of Minnesota, to Princeton. Darryl joined the Peace Corps in 1963, serving in Thailand. Soon after he completed service, Darryl joined the State Department and was assigned to his first post in India. That was just the beginning, as further assignments and increasing responsibilities took Darryl to Taiwan, Hong Kong, Moscow, China and Poland. After the breakup of the Soviet Union, Darryl was selected to be the first Ambassador to Lithuania. He would eventually rise to the rank of Under Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs, and - coming full circle to his Peace Corps service - becoming our nation's Ambassador to Thailand. Darryl would later share his experiences with the next generation of diplomats, teaching at the Scoop Jackson School of International Relations at the University of Washington. 

     

    He said he knew he wanted to be in the foreign service by the time he was in 4th grade. The career of Thomas Gallagher (1940-2018) was extensive and notable. And it began with the Peace Corps, which Tom applied to five days after graduating from Monmouth University in 1962. Tom served as a volunteer in Ethiopia. He would later become among the earliest supporters of Eritrean independence and remained devoted to the country the remainder of his life. Following service and a brief stint in the White House (working on the Johnson administration's War on Poverty), Tom joined the State Department in 1965, taking on assignments in Saudi Arabia and Ecuador. His work with the Office of Personnel - including breakthrough hires of women - would later result in Tom winning the Tragen Award, honoring support for the women's movement at State in its early days. In 1975, Tom became the first government officer to publicly and voluntarily "come out" as a gay man. This decision forced Tom to resign from the State Department. He would travel to California and pursue a career as a social worker. He returned to the State Department in 1994, when the policy of formal discrimination against gay foreign service officers was lifted. In 2015 Monmouth University named Tom its Distinguished Alumnus of the Year. In 2016, New Jersey Pride honored Tom with its Trailblazer award.

     

    A Peace Corps official in the 1960's, he would later become the founding president of Radio Free Asia. Dick Richter (1929 - 2018) graduated from New York Queens College in 1950, and began a career in journalism. Dick was a copy aide at the New York Times and then became a reporter at Newsday and the New York World-Telegram Sun. In the 1960's he joined Peace Corps staff, first as an overseas program evaluator and later as the deputy director of programs in Kenya. Dick returned to journalism, this time moving to television. He was a news producer at WETA public television in Washington. He also worked as a news producer for ABC television, including serving as founding producer of "Good Morning America". In 1996, Dick was appointed as founding president of Radio Free Asia (RFA). Upon his retirement in 2005, he said "Repressive governments reviled RFA because we were letting people know what was going on in their own countries - providing information that their own leaders would suppress."

     

    Debra (Hunt) Nace (1970 - 2018) along with her husband William died earlier this year from injuries sustained in an auto accident. After graduating with degrees in Agronomy and French from Iowa State University, Debra Nace joined the Peace Corps, serving in Senegal. Her public service would continue. Debra was hired by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, where she would work for the Natural Resources Conservation Service in Iowa, Pennsylvania, Idaho and Ohio. She also worked on Puerto Rico hurricane recovery efforts with FEMA. Debra was a co-leader of a Girl Scout troop, and a member of the Delaware (OH) Women's City Club. 

     

    Clair Elmer Skold's (1933 - 2018) service as Peace Corps overseas staff was ten years in length, first as Associate Director in Malaysia and later as Country Director in the Kingdom of Tonga. Between the age of four and nine, Elmer accompanied his family to west-central Alaska, where his parents traveled to teach English to Eskimos. The family then moved to Washington state, where Elmer would eventually graduate from the University of Washington. Following his overseas Peace Corps assignments, Elmer and his family moved back to the Seattle area. He was a member of the Bothell United Methodist Church choir for forty years, and also participated in a men's gospel group that performed at area churches, nursing homes and public gatherings. He was appointed as an original member of the city of Kenmore's Downtown Task Force. Elmer also served many years on the Kenmore Heritage Society.

     

    Below is our In Memoriam list for members of the Peace Corps community who recently passed away:

     

    STAFF

    Dick Richter, 6/29/18

    Clair Elmer Skold, 6/6/18

    MULTIPLE COUNTRIES

    Robert J. Attaway (Nigeria/Ethiopia), Posted 7/15/18

    Lilly Otto (Ecuador 1980-82; Guatemala 1982-84), 7/7/18

    ANTIGUA

    John Logan "Jack" Bullister (1973-75), 6/13/18

    BRAZIL

    William Paul "Bill" Sloane, 7/7/18

    CHAD

    Christopher W. Duarte (1991-93), 6/26/18

    COSTA RICA

    Eric Charles Lehman (1976-78), 7/10/18

    ETHIOPIA

    Thomas Gallagher (1962-64), 7/8/18

    FIJI

    Lee Brelie (1969-71), 6/16/18

    GHANA

    John Thomas Hutton (1969-71), 6/26/18

    HONDURAS

    Janice Rule (1980-82), 7/14/18

    INDIA

    Aaron Vail Frost III (1965-66), 7/7/18

    Dan Gusewelle, 7/8/18

    IRAN

    George Townsend Dorrill (1967-69), 7/13/18

    KENYA

    Terry B. Carpenter (1963-67), 6/12/18

    LESOTHO

    Beth Healy, 6/19/18

    Jenny Phillips (1967-69), 7/9/18

    NIGERIA

    Whitney P. Foster (1964-66), 3/24/18

    Norm Gary (1961-63), 6/24/18

    PHILIPPINES

    Charles P. Brown Jr., 7/5/18

    Richard J. (Dick) Zecher (1962-64), 7/5/18

    POLAND

    Aimee Thompson, 7/10/18

    SENEGAL

    Debra Anne (Hunt) Nace, 2/3/18

    THAILAND

    Joan Boyce (1963 - 65), 6/14/18

    Darryl Johnson (1963-65), 6/24/18

    TOGO

    Irene R. Schreck, 6/24/18

    TURKEY

    Edward Klinger (1966-68), 7/10/18

    COUNTRY OF SERVICE NOT SPECIFIED

    Robert Craig Smith, 7/4/18

    Patricia Stoddard, 7/5/18

     

     

     

    • Judy Marcouiller Patricia (Pat) Stoddard was one of our Teacher Trainer volunteers in Sierra Leone - she was assigned to the Milton Margai Teacher Training Institute from 1990-92 (I think). Sorry to hear of her... see more Patricia (Pat) Stoddard was one of our Teacher Trainer volunteers in Sierra Leone - she was assigned to the Milton Margai Teacher Training Institute from 1990-92 (I think). Sorry to hear of her passing. -Judy Marcouiller
      1 year ago