In Memoriam

  • Jonathan Pearson posted an article
    We remember Peace Corps community members who recently passed away see more

    As 2018 comes to a close, we celebrate the lives of members of the Peace Corps community who recently passed away.

     

    Educator. Public Servant. Activist. Charles "Chuck" Hitchcock (1939-2018) took on many important roles during his life. After graduating from Colgate University, Chuck served his country as an early member of the Peace Corps, serving in Bangladesh. After returning home he continued his studies, earning a masters in community studies and human relations at New York University, and a doctorate from Union graduate school. His dissertation on psychiatric attitudes towards homosexuality helped prompt the American Psychiatric Association to discontinue classifying homosexuality as being a disease. Chuck was a founder of Long Island's East End Gay Organization, which would grow to nearly 1,000 members. Over time, the group raised 100 thousand dollars to support AIDS research. From 1981- 83, Chuck served on the National Gay Task Force. A resident of East Hampton, Chuck served his community. He was chairman of the town Zoning Board of Appeals, was on the town preservation advisory committee, was a member of the Springs School Board and board director of The Retreat, a domestic violence agency. Chuck taught sociology at Southampton College for 35 years, and was dean of the college for five years. In 1999, he received the school's David Newton Teaching Excellence Award.

     

    He was the first country director in Turkey. Prior to his Peace Corps service, David N. Weinman (1934-2018) served three years as an officer in the U.S. Navy and attended the University of Michigan Law School. From 1962 to 1967, Dave's leadership with Peace Corps' Turkey program saw the number of volunteers increase from 39 to just under 500. Dave continued his public service following Peace Corps, holding leadership positions with the Office of Economic Opportunity, the Department of Health, Education and Welfare, and the Office of Management and Budget. He was part of a team of specialists that helped shape and establish the U.S. Department of Education. After this impressive career in government, Dave started his own business, Ombud Inc., a service organization providing college advisory, mediation and consultation services.

     

    Known to most as "Hal", David Harold Averett (1949-2018) was a huge contributor to communities all over the world. Hal grew up in Georgia, attending Georgia Tech to study architecture and later graduating from the University of Georgia. After receiving his degree, he went abroad with the Peace Corps, serving in Central and South American countries. After quite a few years, he went back to his home in Georgia and started his own building firm, D. Hal Averett Contracting, Inc. He got himself involved in as many things as he could. He was a significant member  in many community organizations and projects. Some of these include things like Columbus Scholars, Safe House, Trinity House, Open Door Community, VIP, IFM, Trees Columbus and many, many more. He played a major influential role in the Riverdale-Porterdale Cemetery Foundation. Hal was also involved in a variety of church affiliated committees and organizations. Mr. Averett absolutely loved his community and many others as well. His commitment to helping others reached around the entire world, from Central America to South America and beyond.

     

    He devoted much of his life to public service, with a focus on land preservation. But first, and soon after marrying his college sweetheart, James Clifton Crain (1946-2018) and his wife Carol left Iowa State University and joined the Peace Corps, serving in Guatemala. Following their service, they moved to New Mexico where James secured his master's degree in public administration from the University of New Mexico. James was hired by the city of Albuquerque, where he purchased land for open space, easements and parks. The next stop was Colorado. After a short stint with the city of Lakewood, James settled into the position of Open Space Director for the city of Boulder. During his 23 years in this role, the acres of protected land nearly quadrupled, from 9,200 to more than 34,000 acres. For these efforts, a plaque in Boulder honors James' work to protect and preserve the beauty of Colorado's Front Range. He won a number of awards, including the 2000 and 2001 Colorado Coalition of Land Trusts Award of Excellence, and the 2007 Outstanding Individual Achievement award from the Colorado Open Space Alliance.

     

    Soon after graduating from the Mt. Auburn School of Nursing in 1963, Catherine O'Brien-Haskell (1943-2018) joined the Peace Corps, serving in Malaysia. She went back to school following her service, attaining a BS in Nursing from the University of New Hampshire. Catherine worked in various capacities in the Boston area, including the Visiting Nurse Association and Boston Healthcare for the Homeless. Catherine was an active volunteer in her community, supporting the Special Olympics, Salvation Army, the Unitarian Universalist Church and the Ethical Society of Boston.

     

    Below is our In Memoriam list for members of the Peace Corps community who recently passed away:

      

    PEACE CORPS STAFF

    John "David" Zielinski, 11/30/18

    MULTIPLE COUNTRIES

    Douglass Dewey (Nigeria, 1966-1967; Kenya, 1969), 10/8/18

    Jeffry Spyhalksi (Sierra Leone; Togo, 1978-1985)

    ARMENIA

    Edward Ball (2005-2007), 11/18/18

    BANGLADESH 

    Charles Hitchcock (1961-63), 10/24/18

    BOTSWANA

    Jorge Angelo Alfaro, 11/29/18

    Margaret "Margie" Snively (1991-93), 11/9/18

    COSTA RICA

    Janice Purington (1964-1966), 11/13/18

    GHANA

    Kevin John Brady, 11/16/18

    Theodore "Tom" Taylor Jr., 11/14/18

    GUATEMALA

    James Clifton Crain (1968-71), 12/9/18

    Ann Elizabeth Heffernan (1980-83), 12/12/18

    JAMAICA

    Marilyn Ruth Mitchell Jones (1991-1994), 11/24/18

    MALAYSIA

    Catherine O'Brien-Haskell (1967-69), 12/11/18

    MOROCCO

    Stephen Osborne (1968-1970), 11/23/18

    Steve Nelson, 11/24/18

    NAMIBIA

    David Christopher Berryman Merritt (2016-18), 11/14/18

    PERU
    Charles Vasquez, 10/30/18

    SENEGAL

    Julia "Judy" Gamble (1989-1992), 11/27/18

    SIERRA LEONE

    Jack Johnston (1962-64), 11/7/18

    SOUTH KOREA

    Frances Lillian Kendall (1978-1980), 11/21/18

    SWAZILAND

    Janyth Pomerville (1991-1993), 11/23/18

    TURKEY

    David N. Weinman (Country Director 1962-67), 12/15/18

    COUNTRY OF SERVICE NOT SPECIFIED

     D. Hal Averett, 11/28/18 

    Noel F. Dudley, 12/7/18

    R. Denning Gearhart (served 1973-74), 12/11/18

    Guy Manley III, 11/27/18

     

     

    If you have information you would like to share for our monthly In Memoriam post, contact obituary@peacecorpsconnect.org

     

  • Jonathan Pearson posted an article
    Remembering members of our community who recently passed away see more

    As the Peace Corps mourns the recent deaths of Togo volunteer Jonathan Mitchell and Namibia trainee Mitchell Herrmann, we also remember the passing of numerous talented and inspiring individuals, including one of the beloved icons of Peace Corps' formative years.

     

    While best known for co-founding a leading organization devoted to development on the African continent, C. Payne Lucas (1933-2018) was first a leading figure in the early days of the Peace Corps. A graduate of the University of Maryland - Eastern Shore and American University, Lucas served in the Air Force and served on the Democratic National Committee. Not long after the formation of the Peace Corps, Lucas was hired. His work with the agency began as a field representative in Togo. He would go on to serve as a country director in Niger, regional director for Africa and director of the office of returned volunteers. In 1971, Lucas helped launch Africare, the largest African-American non profit organization focusing on African development. At the time of his 2002 retirement, the organization had distributed $400 million to 27 nations to combat poverty and drought, advance agriculture and address the HIV/AIDS crisis.

     

    There are many varied roles played by Peace Corps volunteers throughout history. But how many can say their assignment included conducting the national symphony? That was the case for Gerald "Jerry" Brown during his service in Bolivia during the late 1960's. Jerry attended Arizona State University on a French Horn scholarship. He would also become a skilled pianist and harpsichordist. After graduating from ASU, Jerry performed with the Phoenix symphony and would study conducting at Julliard. During his five years of Peace Corps service, Jerry became the principal conductor of Bolivia's National Symphony. This led to a long post-Peace Corps period of teaching and conducting across Latin America. Jerry spent many years leading the Costa Rica National Symphony and helped create that country's national youth symphony and youth music program.   

     

    Rabbi Rachel Cowan (1941-2018) is being remembered as a pioneer in the Jewish healing movement. After her marriage to writer and author Paul Cowan in the mid-1960's, the couple traveled to Mississippi to participate in the registration of black voters, and soon after joined the Peace Corps, serving in Ecuador. Following her husband's death, Cowan in 1990 became one of the co-founders of the Jewish Healing Center, established to provide spiritual resources and wisdom to help people deal with suffering that surrounds personal loss and personal illness. Rabbi Cowan would next move on to the Nathan Cummings Foundation, serving 14 years as director of the center's Jewish Life and Values program. She also worked at the Institute for Jewish Spirituality in Manhattan.

     

    The social justice organization Empower Missouri is nearly 120 years old. For 25 of those years, the organization (formerly known as the Missouri Association for Social Welfare - MSW) was led by Peter Salvatore De Simone (1937-2018). Trained initially as a civil engineer, Peter was among the first wave of Peace Corps Volunteers, serving in Tanzania beginning in 1961. After Peace Corps, Peter's commitment to national service continued with a stint working for Volunteers in Service to America (VISTA). It was in 1977, when Peter was hired to lead MSW. During his tenure, the agency contributed to the establishment of the Missouri Foundation for Health and the Housing Trust Fund. In 1995, the Ethical Society of St. Louis awarded Peter with the Humanist of the Year Award for his lifetime commitment to social justice. 

     

    Soon after graduating from the University of Washington in 1965, Barbara Bailey (1943-2018) joined the Peace Corps, serving as a volunteer in Turkey. After returning from service, Barbara became a caseworker with the Washington juvenile justice system. A trip to Sun Valley, Idaho to take time off would lead to a major career shift. In between skiing, hunting and softball, Barbara took a job clerking at the Ex Libris bookstore. Her interest in books led her to soon purchase the store. In 1977, Barbara would return to Seattle, where she opened the B. Bailey Bookstore. In 1982 she co-founded Bailey Coy Books. This store became a magnet for bookstores and authors. The store also became a gathering place for Seattle's LGBTQ community. Barbara became a founding board member of Seattle's Pride Foundation, now the largest community foundation of its kind in the country. She also served on the national board of Lambda Legal. After selling her bookstores, Barbara returned to her family home in Chevy Chase, near Port Townsend. Along with her family, Barbara expaned a nearby golf course and established Chevy Chase Cabins, a popular resort on Discovery Bay.

     

    Dr. David S. Smith Jr. (1943-2018) was a man of many interests. After graduating from the University of Washington with a degree in finance, he found himself doing volunteer work in Colombia for the Peace Corps. After his three years of service, he returned to the states and got a job with the Sea Land Corporation. Not long after that, David went back to school to become a doctor. His medical education and training took him to Mexico, New Jersey and Illinois. At the age of 40 he began his practice at a clinic in Delaware, Ohio. When he wasn't working in the clinic, David spent much of his time doing community service. He worked with organizations such as the Delaware County Chapter Central Ohio Diabetes Association, the Delaware County Easter Seal Society, Big Brothers/Big Sisters and Habitat for Humanity. Even after he retired, he continued his work as a volunteer physician and went on many medical mission trips to New Zealand, Honduras and Haiti.Throughout his career, David was recognized for much of his work. He was selected as one of the recipients for the Outstanding Young Men of America Award back in 1971 and was more recently honored by the Ohio Academy of Family Physicians as its 2005 Physician of the Year. He also received the Rotary Club Paul Harris award and the Delaware Area Chamber of Commerce Wayne Hillbom Lifetime Achievement Award alongside his wife Dolores.

     

    Below is our In Memoriam list for members of the Peace Corps community who recently passed away:

     

    STAFF

    David Danielson, 8/27/18

    Bonnie Daniels Gardner, 8/10/18

    C. Payne Lucas, 9/15/18

    MULTIPLE COUNTRIES

    Phyllis Jean Inman (Belize 1985-87; Nepal 1991-94), 8/28/18

    Michael Weintraub M.D. (Guinea, Togo 1966-68)

    BOLIVIA

    Gerald "Jerry" Brown (1966-71), 8/12/18

    Bevin Smith McCarthy, 8/13/18

    CHILE

    Peter J. Murray, 8/22/18

    COLOMBIA

    William Cornwell (1962-64), 8/2/18

    C. Kermit "Kit" Ewing, 8/7/18

    Dr. David S. Smith Jr. (1966-69), 8/22/18

    Frederick F. "Buck" Thornburg, 9/19/18

    ECUADOR

    Rabbi Rachel Cowan, 8/31/18

    Valarie A. Furst, 8/26/18

    ETHIOPIA

    Lauren Elizabeth Laabs, 8/18/18

    HONDURAS

    Hugh "Stewart" Gregg (1962-1964), 9/5/18

    INDIA

    Lawrence T. Cerep, 8/16/18

    Joseph Michael McFarlan (1972-74), 9/15/18

    KENYA

    Alexander Reisbord (1971-73), 9/10/18

    Joyce Dee Peterson, 7/19/18

    LESOTHO

    Burch Alan Harper (1989-91), 7/10/18

    MICRONESIA

    Carol Bergner (1970-72), 9/14/18

    MOROCCO

    Dana S. Kephart (1969-71), 3/1/18

    NAMIBIA

    Mitchell Herrmann, 8/16/18

    NEPAL

    Robert Anthony Garcia, 9/13/18

    NIGER

    John David Bowling, 8/13/18

    NIGERIA

    Edward R. Pautienus (1961-64), 8/26/18

    PERU

    Hank Davenport Barberis (1962-64), 7/2/18

    PHILIPPINES

    Karen Rosalie Emerson, 9/13/18

    Jerry Poznak (1961-63), 7/18

    Richard Howard "Rik" Rodefer (1962-63), 8/18/18

    SIERRA LEONE

    Roger B. Hirschland (1965-69), 8/18/18

    Sharon Lee Milukas, 9/9/18

    SWAZILAND

    Donna Fitzpatrick Kennedy (2014-16), 6/25/18

    TANZANIA

    Peter Salvatore De Simone (1961-63), 8/30/18

    TOGO

    Jonathan Mitchell, 9/4/18

    TUNISIA

    Ronald Mahka, 8/24/18

    TURKEY

    Barbara Bailey (1965-67), 9/1/18

    COUNTRY OF SERVICE NOT SPECIFIED

    James Keith Blalock, 8/13/18

    Ronald Gary Findlay, 9/12/18

    Elizabeth "Betty" DeWolfe Hummer, 9/6/18

    Patrick Kerwin Parsons, 8/20/18

    John R. Pettit, 8/10/18

    William "Roger" Pickens Jr., 9/17/18

    George Robins, 7/29/18

    Ida Katherine Yates, posted 9/9/18

     

  • Jonathan Pearson posted an article
    We remember those within the Peace Corps community who recently passed away. see more

    It's not necessarily surprising that some of the Returned Peace Corps Volunteers (RPCVs) we recently lost continued their public service and left their mark with the Environmental Protection Agency, the (former) Department of Health, Education and Welfare, and VISTA. But there are other achievements as well. For example, the look and feel of many of our nation's iconic theme parks are the result of an RPCV. And a well-known psychologist who frequently appeared with Larry King, Phil Donahue and Oprah? You guessed it - an RPCV. 

     

    Many of our NPCA affiliate groups are represented by long-serving, outstanding leaders. Members of the Friends of Thailand (FOT) are mourning the loss of Carolyn Nickels-Cox (1947-2018), who co-founded the group in 2001 and served as its president. Carolyn joined the Peace Corps in 1971 and was assigned to Annukulnaree Girls’ School in Kalasin Province. She continued her service between 1973 and 1975, working with Thailand's Ministry of Education in Bangkok. For many years, Carolyn would make annual visits to her country-of-service and home site. During these visits, she would meet with Peace Corps staff and U.S. Embassy personnel, help with planning of the 40th, 45th and 50th anniversary celebrations of Peace Corps service in the country, and visit projects supported by FOT. Under Carolyn's stewardship, FOT members donated more than $125,000 since 2002 to support 125 community projects. This included funds for volunteer-counterpart and returned volunteer projects, and critically-needed aid in response to the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. FOT's tsunami aid included funding for the Burmese population living in southern Thailand. 

     

    Peter J. Maki (1948-2018) was born and raised on a farm in Wisconsin. He grew up raising cattle, milking them for his family’s own dairy. When he finished high school, Maki continued his education at the University of Wisconsin, where he studied mathematics and met his wife. After college, he decided to join the Peace Corps, serving two years in Bolivia with a dairy project. When he returned home, he and his wife decided to serve again, this time together as a Peace Corps team in El Salvador. Following his Peace Corps service, Peter pursued some of his many interests. He became a dairy farmer in Missouri for a period of time, but would later become a park ranger in Maui. He also went back to school at the University of Wisconsin and became a USDA loan officer. While living in Oroville California, Peter was a member of the city planning commission. He also organized farmer’s markets and helped create a Veterans Memorial. During his years of retirement in Missouri he focused his energy on behalf of environmental stewardship groups such as the Missouri Stream Team and Fuels for Schools.

     

    Fred F. Guyton Jr. (1938-2018) graduated from the University of Illinois with a degree in architecture. He received a fellowship from the Center of Inter American Housing and Planning which allowed him to go to Bogota, Colombia with the Peace Corps. He would continue serving his nation when he was inducted into the United States Army in the combat Engineer Battalion as a helicopter pilot. When he was discharged, he began his career as an architect. His most notable position was when he was Chairman at Peckham Guyton Albers & Viets Inc. Under his leadership, the firm earned both regional and national awards for outstanding designs. He helped lead projects all over North America, Europe, South America and Asia, including Busch Gardens, many SeaWorld Adventure Parks, Universal Studios Theme Parks and the Space Command Headquarters at Peterson Air Force Base in Colorado. Guyton also participated in many different architectural boards, civic groups as well as fundraising organizations. He was a trustee for the St. Louis Science Center, the President and Board member of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and was also appointed to a variety of positions by numerous St. Louis mayors. 

     

    Carl Elliott Meacham (1941-2018) is just one of the many people who dedicated their whole life to their work. Meacham graduated from Howard University and then joined the Peace Corps, serving as a volunteer in Liberia. He continued his service as an educator in the Virgin Islands for many years. When he got back to the states, Carl was hired as the director of Cooperative Education at Mary Holmes College in Mississippi. He next accepted positions to work on the staff of New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller, and then joined the US Department of Health, Education and Welfare under the Carter administration. After his many careers, he went back to school and got his PhD in political science. He was a professor at the University of New York - Oneonta, and also taught at the University of New York - Albany and Cornell University.  Carl had many pieces of his work published in prestigious journals. His research focused mostly on Latin American demographic shifts in public policies.

     

    Coming out of high school, Dr. Dwight D. Roper (1937-2018) enlisted in the Army and was stationed in Berlin, Germany. When he came home, he went to college in Arkansas and then joined the Peace Corps, serving on a small island in the Philippines as an elementary school teacher. Upon his return, he decided to go back to school again and started working for the federal government and with the Volunteers in Service to America (VISTA) and other programs. This allowed him to travel around the country. Eventually he settled down and started a family, all the while pursuing his PhD at Stanford University. He had extensive knowledge on history, literature and theology and much of his work was published in academic journals and magazines.

     

    After two years of Peace Corps service in Somalia in the late 1960's, Karen Shanor (1943-2018) was hired by the agency to work as a consultant psychologist. It is said Peace Corps was a critical touch point for her career, as she became a champion for understanding diverse perspectives. In the early 1970's, Karen completed her Ph.D in psychology from the United States International University in San Diego. After moving to Washington DC, Karen began a private practice and received much attention and acclaim for her 1978 book, "The Shanor Study." For five years, she hosted a program on WRC radio. That would lead to television from the early 1980's through the 1990's. She hosted a regular psychology show on the ABC/Hearst Cable Network, and became a regular guest on programs hosted by Oprah Winfrey, Charlie Rose and Phil Donahue. She was a member of the Georgetown University Department of Psychology from the early 2000's through 2015. She also served as a White House consultant and served on several prestigious professional boards and associations.

     

    Below is our In Memoriam list for members of the Peace Corps community who recently passed away:

      

    PEACE CORPS STAFF

    Liduvina "Lido" Caserta, 9/23/18

    MULTIPLE COUNTRIES

    Florence Sumire Griffen (Ecuador; Thailand), 9/4/18

    Philip Matheson Janes (India 1963-1965; Southeast Asia 1965-1967), 9/22/18

    Peter J. Maki (Bolivia 1969-1971; El Salvador 1971-1973), 9/9/18

    Rev. Lafayette Seymour (Pakistan Vol. 1962-64; Nigeria staff 1966-68 and India staff 1968-71) 8/18/18

    AFGHANISTAN 

    David Moskowitz (1964-1966), 9/8/18

    BANGLADESH

    Charles A. Herron, 9/28/18

    BELIZE

    Sara L. Wittenberg, 8/25/18

    BRAZIL

    Richard John Axelson, 10/11/18

    COLOMBIA

    Fred F. Guyton Jr. (1961-1962), 9/28/18

    Charles Gordon Perry III, 10/4/18

    COSTA RICA

    Terry Lee LeMahieu (1986-1988), 9/30/18

    FIJI

    Roger S. Whitley (1984-1986), 10/4/18

    GHANA

    Marcia Spink, 9/28/18

    IRAN

    Mary Janice Davis, (1966-1968) 10/8/18

    JAMAICA

    Bertil Merland "Bert" Dahlman, 10/4/18

    LIBERIA

    Ruth Jacobson (1971-1974), 9/17/18

    Carl Elliott Meacham, 9/2/18

    NAMIBIA

    Teresa Ann Heger, 10/8/18

    NEPAL

    William "Bill" Durdan (1964-1966), 10/5/18

    PANAMA

    Kevin Lewis Webb, 9/22/18

    PHILIPPINES

    Barbara A. Crumbaker Teves (1961), 10/2018

    Dwight D. Roper (1962-1964), 10/3/18

    SAIPAN

    Sara "Sally" Porter (1966-1968), 9/15/18

    SAMOA

    Larry Jude Lopes (2006-2007), 9/26/18

    SOMALIA

    Karen Shanor (1967-69), 7/27/18

    SWAZILAND

    James Stephen Hank (1968-1970), 10/5/18

    Michael W. Mertz (1969-1970), 9/20/18 

    THAILAND

    Carolyn Nickels-Cox (1971-75), 9/25/18

    THE GAMBIA

    Gavin Gladding (1998-2000), 9/16/18 

    VIETNAM

    Dennis P. Nash, 10/1/18

    COUNTRY OF SERVICE NOT SPECIFIED

    Samuel Walter Denton, 8/8/18

    Norman Howard, 9/17/18

     

  • Jonathan Pearson posted an article
    We remember and honor members of the Peace Corps community who recently passed away. see more

    One joined the profession of her historically significant grandfather. One dedicated his life to historic preservation. One devoted her life to girls education.

    When the lives of Returned Peace Corps Volunteers fade away, remembrances bring light on their many amazing contributions. We recognize and remember the achievements of some of the members of our community we lost in recent weeks.

     

    After graduating from Radcliffe College, Alice Popkin (1928-2018) went on to graduate from Yale Law school. In pursuing a legal career, she would follow in the footsteps of her grandfather, Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis. It was also at Yale, however, where Alice joined the National Student’s Association and met fellow classmate Sargent Shriver. While Alice worked in public service law until 1987, she joined Shriver during the early days of the Peace Corps, assisting with establishing a number of Peace Corps offices and programs around the world. Continuing her commitment to public service, Alice served as special counsel to a Senate subcommittee investigating juvenile delinquency. She was later serve as Associate Administrator for International Affairs at the Environmental Protection Agency. Committed to her community of Chatham, Massachusetts, she was a trustee and five year president of the Eldredge Library and served on the Chatham Community Preservation Committee and Harbor Management Committee. She was also a Trustee at Radcliffe College.

     

    When asked when she would discontinue her overseas relief work and return to the United States, MaryJo Aerts (1985 - 2018) was reported to have replied, "When all the four million girls in Afghanistan can go to school." MaryJo was working with Catholic Relief Services (CRS) in Afghanistan and Laos at the time of her death. A graduate of the University of Wisconsin - Stevens Point and the University of Portland, MaryJo began her career in education at St. Anthony's Nativity School in Portland. She then joined the Peace Corps and served in Nicaragua. Following Peace Corps and prior to joining CRS, she spent three years teaching at the St. Augustine Prepatory School in Nicaragua. 

     

    For thirty years, Dominican Republic (1963-64) Peace Corps Volunteer Phillip Foster Brown (1937 – 2018) served our nation through the US Department of Agriculture as an agricultural economist. But those who knew him also were aware of Phillip’s longtime involvement with woodturning as a craft art. He was one of the early members of the American Association of Woodturners, helped found a chapter in Montgomery County Maryland and was honored in 2017 by the county with a Lifetime Impact Award for Excellence in the Arts and Humanities. Phillip was active in a number of other organizations devoted to the craft. His wood sculptures and bowls can be found in many private collections and nine museums, including the Smithsonian’s Renwick Gallery.

     

    It is not an exaggeration to say that Michael E. Emrick (1945 – 2018) left his mark on the city of Nashville. A graduate of Washington University in St. Louis, Michael studied and practiced architecture for fifty years, including during his service as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Malaysia. His career would eventually bring him to Tennessee, where he began in 1978 working on a master plan for the Rugby Colony. His work there would bring him national recognition. In Nashville, much of Michael’s work centered on restoration of the Germantown section of the city. There, he worked on sixty projects in forty different buildings. For this work, Nashville’s Metropolitan Historic Commission honored Michael with a Lifetime Achievement Award. Taken together, Michael worked on seven National Historic Landmarks, nineteen National Register Historic Districts and nearly one hundred National Register listed properties.

     

    The vibrant twists and turns through the life of Barbara Jean Sullivan (1944 – 2018) included Peace Corps service in Malaysia. A 1967 graduate of Mercy College, Barbara’s degree in mathematics would lead her to become one of the first computer programmers for IBM. She would later work at National Geographic, and was a small business owner with her husband. The larger world would call Barbara overseas as a Foreign Service Officer, where she served at U.S. embassies in eight different nations. Barbara’s commitment to others would continue upon retirement to Daniel Island South Carolina. She volunteered and supported organizations including Meals on Wheels, the Low Country Pregnancy Center and Hospice of Charleston.

     

    Below is our In Memoriam list for members of the Peace Corps community who recently passed away:

     

    STAFF

    Alice Popkin (1961-63), 7/18/18

    Marjorie E. McLean, 7/13/18

    MULTIPLE COUNTRIES

    Barbara Dove (Democratic Republic of Congo 1972-74; Burkina Faso 1974-76), 7/26/18

    James A. Pratt (Tunisia, Togo), 7/4/18

    CHILE

    Ward D. Belding Jr. (1964-66), 6/27/18

    COLOMBIA

    John F. Ryan (1967-69), 8/11/18

    COSTA RICA

    James E. Niles, 7/10/18

    DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

    Phillip Foster Brown (1963-64), 7/14/18

    ECUADOR

    David H. Rathbun, 8/9/18

    ETHIOPIA

    Myrna Logan (1967-69), 6/26/18

    FIJI

    Barbara Ann Lee Knutson (1990-93), 7/22/18

    GHANA

    Gwen Lee Rosser (1964-66), 7/23/18

    GUATEMALA

    Eric Woodman Rozendaal, 7/10/18

    INDIA

    Steven K. Thomas, 7/29/18

    MALAYSIA

    Michael E. Emrick, 7/3/18

    Nell Quigley McCombs (1967-69), 7/14/18

    Barbara Jean Sullivan, 7/22/18

    Carol S. Wheelock (1963-65), 8/10/18

    MICRONESIA

    Ruth Marie Duperret (1968-70), 8/6/18

    MOROCCO

    Lesta Chandler (1984-86), 7/23/18

    NICARAGUA

    MaryJo Aerts, 8/2/18

    PALAU

    Tom Blackburn (staff), 7/22/18

    PHILIPPINES

    Joanne Frances (Holland) Machmer (1962-64), 2/28/18

    SOUTH KOREA

    Edward Gignoux Jr., 7/20/18

    John L. Grant (1967-69), 7/23/18

    Joseph T. Sefcheck (1972-75), 7/10/18

    TANZANIA

    Nancy Lee O'Donnell (1966-68), 6/29/18

    THAILAND

    Roger Archie Coulombe, 2/22/18

    COUNTRY OF SERVICE NOT SPECIFIED

    Joan Cecilia Andring, 7/18/18

    Charles Henry Howe III, 7/26/18

    Myron Alexander Nachbar, 7/15/18

    Sage Douglas Remington, 7/31/18

     

     

  • Jonathan Pearson posted an article
    We remember those within the Peace Corps community who recently passed away. see more

     Whether through the State Department, Radio Free Asia, FEMA, or the Department of Agriculture, Peace Corps was a springboard for continued service to our nation among a number of distinguished individuals we lost in recent weeks.

     

    Peace Corps Volunteer. Diplomat. Friend and supporter of the National Peace Corps Association. Service on the NPCA Board of Directors was just one of the boards Darryl Norman Johnson (1938 -2018) served on, following a long and distinguished career in the foreign service. Darryl's formal education took him across the country, from the University of Puget Sound, University of Washington, to the University of Minnesota, to Princeton. Darryl joined the Peace Corps in 1963, serving in Thailand. Soon after he completed service, Darryl joined the State Department and was assigned to his first post in India. That was just the beginning, as further assignments and increasing responsibilities took Darryl to Taiwan, Hong Kong, Moscow, China and Poland. After the breakup of the Soviet Union, Darryl was selected to be the first Ambassador to Lithuania. He would eventually rise to the rank of Under Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs, and - coming full circle to his Peace Corps service - becoming our nation's Ambassador to Thailand. Darryl would later share his experiences with the next generation of diplomats, teaching at the Scoop Jackson School of International Relations at the University of Washington. 

     

    He said he knew he wanted to be in the foreign service by the time he was in 4th grade. The career of Thomas Gallagher (1940-2018) was extensive and notable. And it began with the Peace Corps, which Tom applied to five days after graduating from Monmouth University in 1962. Tom served as a volunteer in Ethiopia. He would later become among the earliest supporters of Eritrean independence and remained devoted to the country the remainder of his life. Following service and a brief stint in the White House (working on the Johnson administration's War on Poverty), Tom joined the State Department in 1965, taking on assignments in Saudi Arabia and Ecuador. His work with the Office of Personnel - including breakthrough hires of women - would later result in Tom winning the Tragen Award, honoring support for the women's movement at State in its early days. In 1975, Tom became the first government officer to publicly and voluntarily "come out" as a gay man. This decision forced Tom to resign from the State Department. He would travel to California and pursue a career as a social worker. He returned to the State Department in 1994, when the policy of formal discrimination against gay foreign service officers was lifted. In 2015 Monmouth University named Tom its Distinguished Alumnus of the Year. In 2016, New Jersey Pride honored Tom with its Trailblazer award.

     

    A Peace Corps official in the 1960's, he would later become the founding president of Radio Free Asia. Dick Richter (1929 - 2018) graduated from New York Queens College in 1950, and began a career in journalism. Dick was a copy aide at the New York Times and then became a reporter at Newsday and the New York World-Telegram Sun. In the 1960's he joined Peace Corps staff, first as an overseas program evaluator and later as the deputy director of programs in Kenya. Dick returned to journalism, this time moving to television. He was a news producer at WETA public television in Washington. He also worked as a news producer for ABC television, including serving as founding producer of "Good Morning America". In 1996, Dick was appointed as founding president of Radio Free Asia (RFA). Upon his retirement in 2005, he said "Repressive governments reviled RFA because we were letting people know what was going on in their own countries - providing information that their own leaders would suppress."

     

    Debra (Hunt) Nace (1970 - 2018) along with her husband William died earlier this year from injuries sustained in an auto accident. After graduating with degrees in Agronomy and French from Iowa State University, Debra Nace joined the Peace Corps, serving in Senegal. Her public service would continue. Debra was hired by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, where she would work for the Natural Resources Conservation Service in Iowa, Pennsylvania, Idaho and Ohio. She also worked on Puerto Rico hurricane recovery efforts with FEMA. Debra was a co-leader of a Girl Scout troop, and a member of the Delaware (OH) Women's City Club. 

     

    Clair Elmer Skold's (1933 - 2018) service as Peace Corps overseas staff was ten years in length, first as Associate Director in Malaysia and later as Country Director in the Kingdom of Tonga. Between the age of four and nine, Elmer accompanied his family to west-central Alaska, where his parents traveled to teach English to Eskimos. The family then moved to Washington state, where Elmer would eventually graduate from the University of Washington. Following his overseas Peace Corps assignments, Elmer and his family moved back to the Seattle area. He was a member of the Bothell United Methodist Church choir for forty years, and also participated in a men's gospel group that performed at area churches, nursing homes and public gatherings. He was appointed as an original member of the city of Kenmore's Downtown Task Force. Elmer also served many years on the Kenmore Heritage Society.

     

    Below is our In Memoriam list for members of the Peace Corps community who recently passed away:

     

    STAFF

    Dick Richter, 6/29/18

    Clair Elmer Skold, 6/6/18

    MULTIPLE COUNTRIES

    Robert J. Attaway (Nigeria/Ethiopia), Posted 7/15/18

    Lilly Otto (Ecuador 1980-82; Guatemala 1982-84), 7/7/18

    ANTIGUA

    John Logan "Jack" Bullister (1973-75), 6/13/18

    BRAZIL

    William Paul "Bill" Sloane, 7/7/18

    CHAD

    Christopher W. Duarte (1991-93), 6/26/18

    COSTA RICA

    Eric Charles Lehman (1976-78), 7/10/18

    ETHIOPIA

    Thomas Gallagher (1962-64), 7/8/18

    FIJI

    Lee Brelie (1969-71), 6/16/18

    GHANA

    John Thomas Hutton (1969-71), 6/26/18

    HONDURAS

    Janice Rule (1980-82), 7/14/18

    INDIA

    Aaron Vail Frost III (1965-66), 7/7/18

    Dan Gusewelle, 7/8/18

    IRAN

    George Townsend Dorrill (1967-69), 7/13/18

    KENYA

    Terry B. Carpenter (1963-67), 6/12/18

    LESOTHO

    Beth Healy, 6/19/18

    Jenny Phillips (1967-69), 7/9/18

    NIGERIA

    Whitney P. Foster (1964-66), 3/24/18

    Norm Gary (1961-63), 6/24/18

    PHILIPPINES

    Charles P. Brown Jr., 7/5/18

    Richard J. (Dick) Zecher (1962-64), 7/5/18

    POLAND

    Aimee Thompson, 7/10/18

    SENEGAL

    Debra Anne (Hunt) Nace, 2/3/18

    THAILAND

    Joan Boyce (1963 - 65), 6/14/18

    Darryl Johnson (1963-65), 6/24/18

    TOGO

    Irene R. Schreck, 6/24/18

    TURKEY

    Edward Klinger (1966-68), 7/10/18

    COUNTRY OF SERVICE NOT SPECIFIED

    Robert Craig Smith, 7/4/18

    Patricia Stoddard, 7/5/18

     

     

     

    • Judy Marcouiller Patricia (Pat) Stoddard was one of our Teacher Trainer volunteers in Sierra Leone - she was assigned to the Milton Margai Teacher Training Institute from 1990-92 (I think). Sorry to hear of her... see more Patricia (Pat) Stoddard was one of our Teacher Trainer volunteers in Sierra Leone - she was assigned to the Milton Margai Teacher Training Institute from 1990-92 (I think). Sorry to hear of her passing. -Judy Marcouiller
      6 months ago
  • Jonathan Pearson posted an article
    We reflect upon the lives of members of the Peace Corps community who recently passed away. see more

    The US Agency for International Development (USAID). The Environmental Protection Agency.  The Department of Health, Education and Welfare. Like thousands of other Returned Peace Corps Volunteers over the decades, a number of those who recently passed away served our nation not only in the Peace Corps, but also in other key branches of our federal government.

     

    Pittsburgh native Norton Lawrence Berman (1931-2018) was never afraid to let his job take him across the world. After completing both his bachelor’s and master’s degree at the University of Pittsburgh, he remained in the city and began his career as a lawyer. A few years later Norton would take a job with USAID and move to Washington, D.C. From there he was called to serve in both Botswana and Liberia as a Peace Corps volunteer before returning stateside to Michigan. But soon enough Norton was back on the move, this time to go work for the newly independent government of Papua New Guinea. Following this, he once again ended up in Michigan where he would found his own economic development consulting firm, BermanGroup, LLC. After more than ten years of working across Europe, Norton settled in New Orleans where he would retire and become an avid supporter of many musical groups and organizations in the Big Easy.

     

    Education was always a driving force in the life of Carol Deforest Locke-Endy (1942-2018). After graduating high school in New Hampshire, she attended Cornell University where she would go on to earn both her bachelor's and master's degree in English. Carol's passion for learning led her to the Peace Corps, where she taught English at a university to students in Colombia. She would also work as a Peace Corps trainer for nine months in Milwaukee following her service in South America. Following this, Carol became the assistant to the vice-president for administration at Brown University before going on to work in similar roles at Hamilton College, Colgate College, St. Mary’s College of Maryland, and her alma mater Cornell. After retiring, she remained an active advocate for civil rights through her work with the Task Force for Racial Equity and Religious Society of Friends.

     

    Much of her post-Peace Corps career occurred in Florida, including active participation (with service as president) of the North Florida RPCVs. For Juel E. Kamke (1946-2018), her path to the Peace Corps began in Wisconsin, where whe studied art and education at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, followed by six years teaching art in Burlington, Vermont. Juel joined the Peace Corps in 1978, serving in El Salvador. Following her service, Juel came to Washington, working as a graphic artist and editor at the Environmental Protection Agency and then becoming Executive Director of the Arlington, Virginia-based Refugee Assistance Center. Her work in Florida began as Field Director of the Coalition of Florida Farmworkers Organizations. Other posts included work as a planner for the Florida Department of Labor and Employment Security, and - lastly - as a Grants Compliance Analyst at Florida State University. Along with the local RPCV affiliate group, Juel was appointed to the Governor's Human Rights Committee and served on the board of the Immokalee Friendship House, serving Tallahassee's homeless community.

     

    When Ronald Joseph Drago (1945-2018) joined the Peace Corps as a volunteer in Sierra Leone, he was starting a lifetime commitment to helping others. Born and raised in Easton, Pennsylvania, Ronald would go on to graduate from East Stroudsburg University where he was also a member of the Sigma Pi Fraternity. After his time working in the Peace Corps, he began working for US AID in Danang and Saigon, Vietnam where he would remain until the end of the Vietnam War. Ronald then went on to help serve refugees as a part of International Rescue Committee. He would then spend 30 years working for United Way, an organization that helps build up communities all across the world. He retired as President of United Way of Northampton and Warren Counties (Easton and Bethlehem, PA), and the United Way of Wake County (Raleigh, NC).

     

    West Africa always held a special place in the heart of Nicolas Peter "Nick" Kulibaba (1951-2018). Once he finished working in his bachelor’s degree in Religion at Allegheny College, Nicholas briefly worked as National Defense Foreign Language Fellow, University of Chicago, and Andhra University, India before he joined the Peace Corp and was assigned his post in Togo. Here he discovered his calling to help fight for the voiceless and empower the powerless all across the world. After volunteering, he found a career in International Trade and Development that took him to over 60 countries across the globe ranging from the former Soviet Union to Latin America. He also spent time working on a USAID project in Bamako, Mali. Many a time did he return to Africa and will be greatly missed by all of his Malian friends and families.


    James Kolb (1941-2018) always had a knack for public service. He graduated from the University of Notre Dame before enrolling in the University of Wisconsin to earn his master’s in American Social History. Before he completed his degree, he answered his first call to public service when he became a Peace Corps volunteer in Colombia where he helped launch instructional TV programs all across the country. After completing his service, he returned to the University of Wisconsin to finish his degree. From there he joined the Peace Corps staff in Washington D.C. as a desk officer for Peru and Chile. In 1968 he was drafted into the military and was stationed in Korea until 1970. After leaving the military, he started working for the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE) in the Department of Health, Education and Welfare (HEW, now Health and Human Services or HHS). He would return to the HEW/HHS after working as a consultant in Germany in 1974 and remain in the bureaucracy until his retirement from federal service in 2002.

     

    Below is our In Memoriam list for members of the Peace Corps community who recently passed away:

     

    STAFF

    John "Jack" Andrews, 5/27/18

    MULTIPLE COUNTRIES

    Monique Baran (Gabon 1975-77; Ghana 1977-78), 5/28/18

    Norton Lawrence Berman (Liberia, Botswana), 5/27/18

    Kristina Marie (Torkelson) Gray (Philippines, Kazakhstan/staff), 5/31/18

    Frederic W. Halbritter (Togo 1971-73; Tunisia 1975), 5/22/18

    Herbert V. Tobias (Afghanistan/Iran 1961-65), 5/23/18 

    ANTIGUA

    William Rafael Saadeh, 6/11/18

    BOLIVIA

    Keith Gardner Williams (1965-67), 5/10/18

    BOTSWANA

    Emil H. Meitzner (1986-89), 5/20/18

    BRAZIL

    Carol Deforest Locke-Endy (1964-66), 5/23/18

    CHILE

    Howard A. Van Vleck Jr. (1967-69), 5/20/18

    COLOMBIA

    Robert Samuel Kenison (1963-65), 6/13/18

    James Kolb, (1963-65), 5/11/18

    COSTA RICA

    Charles Lee Chaney, 5/15/18

    DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

    Jill Aldridge (2000-02), 6/1/18

    ECUADOR

    John Christopher Farina (1970-73), 5/16/18

    EL SALVADOR

    Juel E. Kamke (1976-78), 6/8/18

    GHANA

    Marion Morrison (1961-63), 4/15/18

    INDIA

    Jeremiah Breen (1968), 1/10/18

    James T. Newton (1966-68)

    Gary Wolcott (1965-67), 5/9/18

    LIBERIA

    Andy Evans (1981-83), Feb/2018

    MALAYSIA

    Claudia Linda Balcom-Milks, 5/15/18

    MICRONESIA

    Evelyn C. Perodeau (1971-73), 5/19/18

    PHILIPPINES

    Edward Neil Cabot (1969-72), 5/26/18

    Patricia Lee Nichol (1963-65), 5/18

    POLAND

    William "Bill" Manning, 6/3/18

    THAILAND

    Leonard Joseph Baczek (1965), 5/16/18

    TURKEY

    Virginia Goshdigian (1963-65), 5/20/18

    SIERRA LEONE

    Ronald Joseph Drago (1967-69), 5/20/18

    Peter A. Krusch - Staff (1968-71) 5/19/18

    SWAZILAND

    Irene Kibalo (1972-75), 6/2/18

    TOGO

    Gregory Spencer Brown, 5/23/18

    Nicolas Peter "Nick" Kuilbaba (1975-78), 5/7/18

    COUNTRY OF SERVICE NOT SPECIFIED

    Colleen K. Wallesser Brown, 5/19/18

    Emily Bukovec, 5/5/18

    Thomas Dalton, 6/12/18

    Rev. Priscilla "Peri" Murdock, 5/29/18

    Larry Snyder, 2/23/18

     

     

     

     

     

  • Jonathan Pearson posted an article
    We remember those in the Peace Corps community who recently passed away. see more

    A firefighter, a quilter and a record-setting weightlifter. While we've come to expect members of the Peace Corps community to distinguish themselves in professions ranging from international development to health care to education, we also find they possess interests, passions and civic commitments that run the gamut of the human experience. We honor those members of our community who recently passed away.

     

    International service was central to the life’s work of Lloyd Oliver Pierson (1940 – 2018). In the early 1980’s, Lloyd worked as legislative staff on Capitol Hill. From the late 1980’s to the early 1990’s, he held various positions with the Peace Corps. Lloyd was Country Director in Ghana, Botswana, Namibia and Swaziland. He would also serve in Washington as Chief of Staff and Acting Director of the agency. Lloyd would go on to serve as Administrator of the US Agency for International Development, Senior International Adviser for the Save Darfur Coalition and President of the U.S. African Development Foundation. Among his varied achievements, Lloyd was also a weightlifter who still holds several national bench press records.

     

    He was part of the early conversations that eventually led to the formation of the Peace Corps. David M. Schimmel (1934-2018) graduated from Yale Law School, where he won a national legal essay contest on “Law and Disarmament”. Over time, he would author or co-author more than 75 articles and seven books on law and education. Soon after the launch of the Peace Corps, David worked six years in various administrative posts at the agency. In 1968, he joined the faculty at UMass-Amherst, first as an associate professor in education. He would work at the university for the next 40 years. He was honored by the school with its Distinguished Academic Outreach Award. He also was recognized for his many achievements by the Education Press Association of America and the Education Law Association.

     

    Born and raised in Chicago, Susan Richardson McKelvey attended Cornell College, then returned to earn a Master’s in Education from the University of Chicago. Susan and her husband Doug became Peace Corps volunteers in Ethiopia. Upon returning from service, Susan became an English teacher. She taught at the high school level in Iowa for many years. She later moved to Maryland and became a middle school teacher. A lover of quilting, Susan co-owned Cottonseed Glory, the first quilt shop in Annapolis. She spent more than twenty years designing, teaching and publishing more than thirty quilting books and patterns. Her love of dogs (golden retrievers in particular) was in evidence when Susan moved to the eastern shore of Maryland. She volunteered at Golden Retriever Rescue, Education and Training, the Talbot Humane Society, Pets on Wheels and Reading with Dogs.

     

    David Scott Palmer (1937-2018) attended Dartmouth College. He was a member of the school's first Ivy League championship football team and captain of the rowing team. He received a Marshall Fellowship to study in Chile, beginning a lifelong relationship with Latin America. In 1963, David was part of the first group of Peace Corps Volunteers to serve in Peru. Following his service, David earned his Master's degree from Stanford and a PhD. in Political Science from Cornell. He then worked for the State Department as Chair of Latin American and Caribbean Studies at the Foreign Service Institute. In 1988 David became a professor at Boston University. He served as chairman of the Political Science Department, Associate Chair of the Department of International Relations, Director of Latin American Studies and Co-Director of Peru summer programs. David taught at Boston University for thirty years, concluding his final semester last fall.

     

    He divided his life between Michigan and Alaska, with a Peace Corps stint in Venezuela in between. Born in Detroit, Marvin Arndt Krogh (1942-2018) attended Central Michigan University, earning a Bachelor's degree in Business Administration. Marvin's Peace Corps service involved teaching physical education to school children. He returned to Michigan after Peace Corps. A pilot, he flew commercially for Zantop Airlines. Marvin hitchhiked to Alaska in 1974, and remained there for the rest of his life. He worked on the trans-Alaska pipeline, worked briefly as an Alaska State Trooper, and served thirty years on the Anchorage Fire Department. Marvin retired in 2010 as Senior Captain of Department Station Seven in Jewel Lake.

     

    Below is our In Memoriam list for members of the Peace Corps community who recently passed away:

     

    STAFF

    Betsy McGregor Cooley (1966-68), 4/25/18

    Lloyd Oliver Pierson, 4/14/18

    David M. Schimmell, 5/4/18

    MULTIPLE COUNTRIES

    James William Wilson (Namibia 1998-200; Ukraine 2005-06), 5/9/18

    ANTIGUA

    Genevieve Diane Osborne Ellis, 4/19/18

    BOLIVIA

    Edward W. Ollick (1962-65),  4/28/18

    BULGARIA

    Richard A. Freed Sr., 5/1/18

    CHILE

    Peter Farmer (1980-81), 4/25/18

    COLOMBIA

    Harlan W. King (1964-66), posted 4/20/18

    COSTA RICA

    Joseph Richard Tkac Jr., 4/26/18

    DOMINICA

    Bill G. Corkins (1984-86), 4/8/18

    DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

    Harvey H. Sims III (1965-67), 4/11/18

    ECUADOR

    John Farina (1971-73)

    ETHIOPIA

    Susan Richardson McKelvey (1966-68), 4/10/18

    Stan Ray Patten (1965-67), 4/18/18

    GUATEMALA

    Diane Lea Brown (1977-79), 5/5/18

    KENYA

    Michael Stringer (1965-67), 1/22/18

    LIBERIA

    Mario Lacenere, 4/25/18

    MALAYSIA

    Dwayne Lee Jeffries (1963-65), 4/20/18

    MICRONESIA

    Charles Edward Chamberlin (1970-72), 4/4/18

    NEPAL

    Stephen M. Sass (Staff 1972-73), posted 4/24/18

    NIGERIA

    Helen Louise Harms (1963-65), 11/28/17

    Richard Bernard Kranzdorf (1961-63), 4/17/18

    Beth Petersen (1963-66), 11/30/17

    Susan Marie Saari-Karasti (1965-66), 3/3/18

    PANAMA

    Kathryn Anderson (1967-70), 4/5/18

    PERU

    David Scott Palmer (1962-64), 4/28/18

    PHILIPPINES

    George Grills (1963-65), 5/5/18

    Kathryn McConnell (1978-79), 4/15/18

    POLAND

    Nello Carlini, 3/18/18

    THAILAND

    Maureen R. Reardon, 4/13/18

    VENEZUELA

    Marvin Arndt Krogh, 3/30/18

    COUNTRY OF SERVICE NOT SPECIFIED

    Elaine E. Caruso, 4/29/18

    Larry P. Durkee, 3/10/18

    Leroy Howard Lange, 5/8/18

    David Joseph Martinez, posted 5/4/18

     

     

     

     

     

  • Jonathan Pearson posted an article
    The Peace Corps community remembers those who served our nation and recently passed away. see more

    Whether at high schools or on college campuses, whether the subjects be vocational education or city planning, people who served in the Peace Corps are scattered throughout our educational landscape. Several dedicated RPCV educators are among those who recently passed away.

     

    John Vernon Morice (Jack) Gibson (1938 - 2018) majored in Romance Languages at the University of Virginia and then went on to get a Master's in Regional Planning from Cornell University. Jack put his degrees to good use while serving in the Peace Corps in Colombia. After his service, Jack continued to serve his community by taking on a number of city planning positions around the country, including Chief of the Long Range Planning Division in the city of Memphis. He went on to teach city planning at the University of Memphis, and was instrumental in getting a graduate program certified. He also taught at Florida State University, and assisted the Citizens to Preserve Overton Park in preventing an interstate highway from running through the park. John's civic engagement included serving as founding Chair of the Beale Street (Memphis) Development Corporation in 1973. He also served as President of Big Brothers/Big Sisters, the Economic Club of Memphis and chair of the board for the Salvation Army.

     

    A world traveler and seasoned teacher, Cheryl Ann Hanson (1950 - 2018) served with her husband as Peace Corps Volunteers in Afghanistan. After a number of additional years overseas, Cheryl and her family settled in Sonoma County, California. Armed with a master's degree in education from Lesley University, she was hired in 1984 as adjunct faculty in the English Department at Santa Rose Junior College. She later moved to the Basic Skills and Vocational Projects Department, where she taught job skills to economically disadvantaged students. From this beginning, she became one of two full-time faculty members, growing the program into a community college model in developmental education. She became chair of the department, serving in that position for eighteen years, growing the department to seven full-time and forty adjunct faculty.

     

    Lawrence Cabot Howard (1925 - 2018) was a lifelong scholar and traveled the world in many different capacities. After serving in World War II, Lawrence received degrees from Drake University, Wayne State University and Harvard. Lawrence went on to teach at Hofstra University and Brandeis University. His growing interest in development work led to his appointment as Associate Peace Corps Director in the Philippines. This was followed by additional opportunities in development and education, including associate director of the Center of Innovation in New York, the Institute of Human Relations at the University of Wisconsin, Vice President of the Danforth Foundation and Dean of the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs at the University of Pittsburgh. Upon retirement, he continued his interest in development work in Sub-Saharan Africa, served as a Fulbright Scholar and worked with the government of the Bahamas as a consultant assisting with public administration policy management.

     

    She was a global citizen prior to her Peace Corps service in Nigeria. Sarah Ann "Sally" Holden Thompson (1935 - 2018) graduated cum laude from Radcliffe College and immediately began working in France. She then moved to Tehran to serve as the social secretary to the wife of the U.S. ambassador to Iran. While in Tehran, Sally worked at a beggar's orphanage and helped many children. Sally returned to the United States to earn her Master's degree from Teacher's College, Columbia University, and then taught at multiple high schools. She used this teaching experience in Nigeria, where she was a Peace Corps Volunteer. While in Nigeria, she taught at a teachers' college and authored the textbook "The Foundations of Modern Civilization." Sally continued to work for the Peace Corps at the Washington, D.C. office. Later, she worked for other organizations including Planned Parenthood and Community Living Toronto.

     

    Peace Corps service in Colombia was a first step that led to the 25 year foreign service career for Weldon Dwayne Burson (1938 - 2018). Weldon joined the State Department in 1965. Along with his country of Peace Corps service, Weldon was stationed in Canada, Venezuela, Mexico, Brazil, Italy and Norway, holding positions including Economic Counselor and Deputy Chief of Mission. He also spent many months in Africa and Asia as a Department of State Inspector. Upon retirement, Weldon served as president of the International Banknote Society, and was inducted into the Society's Hall of Fame in 2014.

     

    Born and raised in Georgia, Robert (Bob) L. Travis Jr. (1939 - 2018) received his Bachelor's from Atlanta's Clark University. While a student, Bob participated in a sit-in, was jailed and put in the same cell as Martin Luther King's brother, A.D. After college, Bob served with the Peace Corps in Ethiopia and in the military in Vietnam. When he returned home, Bob studied law at Howard University. He became the first statewide director of Florida Legal Services. He also served as Executive Director of the Division of Community Services and Executive Director and Founder of Florida Rural Legal Services.

     

    Betty Mae Ridley (1923 - 2018) was a lifelong volunteer who understood the importance of service to her community. Betty completed her nursing degree in Prescott, Arizona at the top of her class. After graduation, she worked as a nurse on Indian reservations in Alaska and Arizona. Betty decided she wanted to continue to serve and see the world, becoming a Peace Corps Volunteer. She completed not one, but three tours of service in Fiji, Haiti and Paraguay. After returning home, Betty moved to Boise, where she continued to volunteer at the Veterans Administration and the local senior center. She was also an active volunteer at the Learning Lab and the Boise Public Library.

      

    Below is our In Memoriam list for members of the Peace Corps community who recently passed away:

     

    STAFF

    Harrison Gregg, 4/2/18

    Virginia Pearl Orr (1967-89), 2/27/18

    MULTIPLE COUNTRIES

    Betty Mae Ridley (Fiji; Haiti 1991; Paraguay 1992-94), 4/1/18

    AFGHANISTAN

    Cheryl Ann Hanson (1974-76), 3/19/18

    BELIZE

    Lloyd Gene Anderson, 3/17/18

    BRAZIL

    Saundra Carter McDonald (1962-64), 4/8/18

    BURKINA FASO

    Mary Kay C. Landis (2007-10), 1/26/18

    COLOMBIA

    Weldon Dwayne Burson, 4/3/18

    John Vernon Morice Gibson (1962-65), 3/24/18

    Pamela Sue Haines, 4/10/18

    ETHIOPIA

    Pamela Ann Noble, 2/1/18

    Robert L. Travis Jr., 3/19/18

    GHANA

    Richard Coyne, 4/5/18

    GUATEMALA

    Dorothy F. Adelman, 3/30/18

    INDIA

    Robert P. Harrington, 4/7/18

    IRAN

    John C. Patterson, 4/8/18

    Darryl Alec Spencer, 3/9/18

    Joseph W. Toussaint, 3/23/18

    JAMAICA

    Ramona Grace (Sartwell) Seeley (1992-94), 4/5/18

    KENYA

    Carol Ketchum Schmidt (1975-76), 3/14/18

    MALAWI

    John Rockwell "Rocky" Smith (1972-74), 1/6/18

    MALAYSIA

    Dr. Robert F. Dendy, 4/14/18

    NAMIBIA

    John Andrew Krispinsky, 3/20/18

    NIGERIA

    Sarah A. Thompson, 3/20/18

    PHILIPPINES

    Lawrence Cabot Howard (Staff 1961-63), 3/26/18

    Cerefino "Sonny" Macaraig Jr. (Staff), 4/7/18

    Richard Bernard McGinn Jr., 3/26/18

    SENEGAL

    Gerald Davey (1962-64), 4/1/18

    SOUTH KOREA

    Bruce Butterfield, 4/15/18

    UZBEKISTAN

    Allen Fine, 3/26/18

    VENEZUELA

    Mark Frances (1964-66), 4/6/18

    COUNTRY OF SERVICE NOT SPECIFIED

    Bill Monroe Hager, 4/3/18

    Paul Crane Robbins, Posted 3/27/18

    James J. Stanley, 3/28/18

     

      

     

     

  • Jonathan Pearson posted an article
    We remember Peace Corps community members who recently passed away. see more

     Those who enter the field of nursing are naturally caring and empathetic. It's not surprising that those qualities, coupled with the vast needs for health care around the world, bring many nurses to the Peace Corps. Included among those members of our community who recently passed away were several dedicated nurses whose work was noteworthy in the United States and overseas.

     

    The nursing career of Marguerite Mary (Dean) Armstrong (1920 - 2018) began in 1942 upon her graduation from Burbank Hospital School of Nursing in Fitchburg, Massachusetts. She traveled west for her first nursing position, working at the American Indian Reservation in Parker, Arizona. Upon completion of her postgraduate degree programs, Marguerite turned her attention from nursing to nursing education. She taught in the L.P.N. program for Practical Nurses at David Hale Fanning Worcester Vocational School. While there, she wrote and procured the grant for the first E.M.T. program in Worcester. In recognition of her work, Marguerite received the Key to the City in 1981. Marguerite's last position was Dean of Health Occupations at Worcester Technical Institute on Bell Hill. Nursing and health remained central to Marguerite's life after retirement. She was a dedicated volunteer with the Visiting Nurses Hospice Association in Worcester and was a founding member of the Rose Monahan Hospice Home. Her care for others extended to other nations as well. This included a decision in 1990, at the age of 70 to become a health educator with the Peace Corps in Ghana. She also volunteered on a health mission to the Ural Mountains in Russia to help care for the stricken children who had been sickened by the Chernobyl nuclear explosion.

     

    Born and raised in Minnesota, Patricia (Griffiths) Prevetz (1921-2018)  graduated from St. Mary’s School of Nursing in Minneapolis in 1945. She would later move to to Walnut Creek, California, where she resided for 63 years. A longtime employee of Kaiser Permanente, Pat developed a range of specialties, including emergency care, head nurse of Pediatrics, and Advice nursing. At age 58, she joined the Peace Corps and served in Liberia, providing health care and education for mothers and infants. When she returned home she continued her volunteer work with Leftovers Thrift Shop in Walnut Creek, whose proceeds supported the Contra Costa Crisis Hotline. As an active member of the Walnut Creek Masters Swim Team, she competed well into her 90s, setting National records and was on the podium at The Worlds in 2006.

     

    Another nurse, Anne Marie (Elkins) Jensen (1937 - 2017) earned her nursing degree at Keuka College in Keuka Park, NY. In 1961, Anne joined the first wave of Peace Corps volunteers to serve in India. She assisted local villagers in creating a successful tool-making shop - the largest industrial shop in the area - making farm implements and hand tools for surrounding villages. Towards the end of her service, her project was featured on the cover of Span magazine, published by the US Embassy in New Delhi. Anne’s service continued upon her return home, as she joined the American Friends Service Committee, fighting for housing and voter rights for minority populations. In 1971, Anne became the one and only school nurse in eastern Oregon’s Mead School District, where she served until her retirement in 2000.

     

    He was Peace Corps’ Country Director in Thailand during the late 1960’s and early 1970’s. That was far from the only connection Julio "Andy" Andrews had with the region. The majority of his career was spent at The Asia Foundation, where he made many important contributions to the organization over three decades. Andy served as country representative in Pakistan, Nepal, the Pacific Islands, the Philippines, Vietnam, and Malaysia. He will especially be remembered for this work to establish the landmark Conference of Chief Justices of Asia and the Pacific, a conference that still meets every other year and has done so for over three decades.

     

    After serving with Naval Intelligence during World War II, Dr. Joseph Colmen (1920 - 2018) came to Washington, and eventually became Deputy Associate Director of the Peace Corps, joining Sargent Shriver in the early years of the agency.  Dr. Colmen later served in the Johnson Administration as Deputy Assistant Secretary for Education in the Department of Health, Education and Welfare. An industrial psychologist, Dr. Colmen retired from public service and spent the next three decades as a private consultant, working on such projects as FAA air traffic controller selection and analysis of teenage smoking behavior.

     

    Below is our In Memoriam list for members of the Peace Corps community who recently passed away:

     

    STAFF

    Joseph Colmen, 3/13/18

    MULTIPLE COUNTRIES

    Marguerite Mary (Dean) Armstrong (Ghana 1990-92; Russia 1997), 2/23/18

    John Robert Shields (Botswana 1966-68; Turkey 1968-70), 2/7/18

    BULGARIA

    Barbara P. Wines (2002-04), 2/24/18

    BRAZIL

    John Hamilton (1967-68), 3/3/18

    CHILE

    Cathy Barnes (1978-82), 3/5/18

    Christine Marie (Guilfoy) Cardenas (1975-77), 3/17/18

    COTE D'IVOIRE

    Lenore Paley Waters (1980-81), 11/28/17

    ECUADOR

    Robert C. Bentley, 3/7/18

    Richard Pelczar (1964-66), 9/29/17

    ETHIOPIA

    John Andrew Goulet (1964-66), 2/7/18

    GUATEMALA

    Douglas Ewell Taber, 2/21/18

    GUINEA

    William M. Fittro (1963-65), 3/2/18

    INDIA

    Anne Marie (Elkins) Jensen, (1961-63), 12/13/17

    JAMAICA

    Marie Ripley, 1/3/18

    KENYA

    Anne M. Eskra, 12/17/17

    LIBERIA

    Patricia (Griffiths) Prevetz (1977-79), 3/2/18

    MALAYSIA

    Frederick Martin Arnold (1965-68), 3/3/18

    Marcia Spock Page, 1/13/18

    MICRONESIA

    Bill Ryder (1966-68), 2/19/18

    PAKISTAN

    Edward Thomas Laughley, 2/26/18

    PHILIPPINES

    Father John M. Lagomarsino SSC, posted 2/25/18

    Ronald Eugene Wallin, 2/7/18

    SAMOA

    Ann Elizabeth Gantt (1978-79), 2/18/18

    SAINT KITTS AND NEVIS

    Corinne Frances Manildi Thiebert, 2/15/18

    SIERRA LEONE

    Henry Barnes "Hank" Watson, 2/20/18

    THAILAND

    Julio "Andy" Andrews (Country Director), 3/4/18

    TUNISIA

    Elizabeth "Penny" White (1964-66), 3/1/18

    TURKEY

    Virginia Marie Schramm (1964-66), 2/14/18

    VENEZUELA

    Charles "Chuck" Schonfeld, 3/12/18

    COUNTRY OF SERVICE NOT SPECIFIED

    Joseph R. De Sousa, 3/10/18

    David Edward Kipp, 3/13/18

    Catherine Logan-Carrillo, 2/19/18

    Michael J. Miller M.D., 2/12/18

      

     

     

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    Ever considered running a marathon? How about the prospect of running 173 marathons?

    Love traveling across the United States? How about literally seeing the country by "riding the rails"?

    Ever thought about being a portrait painter? How would you fare as an ambidextrous artist?

    When it comes to our Peace Corps community, one thing that's for certain is that our lives are both abundantly full and impressively divergent. And that was the case among those who passed away in recent weeks.

    Roberta "Bobbie" McCarthy (1943 - 2017) rose to the pinnacles of power within our government, serving for a period as Deputy Chief of Staff for then First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton. But after graduating from Syracuse University, Bobbie's commitment to public service began with the Peace Corps. Following Peace Corps, Bobbie became the first female Director of Oral Histories at the JFK Library. Other professional accomplishments included serving as Director of Save America's Treasures, and Vice Chairman of Vital Voices, a human rights organization founded by Ms. Clinton and former Secretary of State Madelaine Albright.

    Her obituary indicates she was the first woman from the state of Georgia to serve in the Peace Corps. After serving as an exchange student in Canada, Rochelle Auletta (1938 - 2017) was an early responder to JFK's call, joining Peace Corps in 1962 to serve in Sierra Leone. As a volunteer, Rochelle taught history and physical education, including helping disabled children to learn how to swim. The LeGrange College (GA) Alumni Association took little time in honoring their colleague in 1965, naming Rochelle as an "Outstanding Young Woman of America." After receiving a Master of Arts degree from the University of Indiana in 1965, she taught history for nearly a decade at schools in Massachusetts, Georgia and New York. Rochelle studied painting for more than 20 years, and mastered portraiture as a professional artist. And, when she fell off a horse and broke her right hand, she taught herself to paint left-handed. Later known for abstract and multi-media works, she was a featured artist in the Dominican Republic, her home for more than 25 years, where one of her biggest accomplishments was working with local residents to protect and attract visitors to Cofresi Cove outside of Puerto Plata.

    The arts were also central to the life of Richard Stuart Teitz (1942 - 2017). His journey began with an M.A. from Harvard in Art History, followed by an M.P.A. from the University of Texas-San Antonio. But Richard's interest was in administration. He eventually settled in San Antonio, becoming the first professionally hired Director at the Alamo. Prior to that he served as Director of the Worcester (MA) Art Museum, the Hood Museum of Art at Dartmouth College, and the Denver Art Museum. Richard joined the Peace Corps in his mid 60's, serving in Panama. He later helped secure grant funding for numerous non-profits and loved working with USAID on several projects in Africa and the nation of Georgia. Another love? Running, including and especially marathons. Participation in high-profile marathons in Boston, New York and Cape Town were among the 173 marathons Richard ran in his lifetime.

    After Lisa Pollard Van Vleck (1944 - 2017) and her husband returned from their late 1960's Peace Corps service in Chile, Lisa was fully committed to the causes of public service and social justice. This led to an MAT from Harvard Graduate School of Education, and teaching in a bi-lingual Spanish/English classroom at the Longfellow School in Cambridge. It was at the organization Cambridge School Volunteers where she built a 30-year career as Director for Corporate Programs. Here she was instrumental in the development of the Reading Buddies and NetPals programs, pairing employees from area companies with nearly 500 public school students each year. For contributions such as this, Lisa was honored in 1998 with the MIT President's Community Service Award in recognition for her contributions to the city of Cambridge.

    While Peace Corps service in Ethiopia began for Leo J. Landkamer (1928 - 2017) and his wife during his early 40's, Leo's love for travel and adventure began earlier. Much earlier. At the age of 14, Leo left home in Wisconsin with a friend to travel throughout the United States by rail, jumping on slow moving trains. As he traveled, Leo took occasional jobs on farm, worked as a night cook on a dredge boat, and spent three years in post-war Japan. That led Leo to service in the Army and Air Force, and later would close out his career with positions in the military in Japan and Germany. In the 1950's, Leo moved to Washington state, attended Seattle University, secured degrees in Mathematics and Business, and worked many years with the Boeing Company, serving first as a computer programmer in the early days of the company.

    Below is our In Memoriam list for members of the Peace Corps community who recently passed away:

     

    STAFF

    Edwin Barker (1966-69), 6/16/17

    Priscilla Grijalva, 5/29/17

    Sherman Hauser, 6/16/17

    Norman Hickey - The Republic of Georgia, 7/19/17

    MULTIPLE COUNTRIES

    Christine Groppe - Bolivia/Ghana, 7/16/17

    Franklin Lee Arbuckle - Colombia/Bolivia (staff) (1964-66/1968-71), posted 6/26/17

    Jean Taylor - Liberia/Jamaica (staff), 5/30/17 

    Richard Teitz - Panama/United States of America, 6/16/17

    BOLIVIA

    Suzanne Angelman Ghelardi (1964-66), 6/25/17

    CHILE

    Lisa Vleck (1967-69), 7/8/17

    COLOMBIA

    Sylvia Middlebrooks, 6/16/17

    Frances O'Connor, 7/18/17

    ECUADOR

    Alta Mae Bush, 6/22/17

    Thomas Pohl, 6/22/17

    ETHIOPIA

    Leo Landkamer (1970-73), 7/24/17

    Susan Shefter, 7/18/17

    GHANA

    Eleanor Dahlstrom (1990), 6/5/17

    HONDURAS

    Mark Leasure (1985 - 87), 7/19/17 

    Elaine Petrini, 7/18/17

    Lucas Wolf, 7/12/17

    INDIA

    Robert Alexander, 4/26/17

    Wilson Moyer Kratz III, 6/22/17

    KENYA

    Kathryn Phyllis Higuera, 6/20/17

    Roberta Greene McCarthy (1964-66), 6/29/17

    MOLDOVA

    Anne Scheuerman (1995-97), 6/14/17

    MOROCCO

    Carol Abel, 6/22/17

    Harriet Storzer (1989-91), 7/20/17

    NEPAL

    Stephen Leaptrot, 7/11/17

    PAKISTAN

    Judith Cooper, (1961-63), 4/18/17

    PERU

    Steven Mainster, 7/10/17

    SENEGAL

    Evelyn Tamela, 6/19/17

    SIERRA LEONE 

    Rochelle Auletta (1962), 6/4/17

    Authur Hamby, Posted 6/20/17

    SOMALIA

    Gordon Staab (1966-68), 7/5/17 

    SOUTH KOREA

    Herbert Bolz (1967-69), 6/28/17

    TANZANIA

    Judith Heintz (1964-1966), 6/12/17

    VENEZUELA

    Lola O'Dea (1965-67), posted 7/24/17

    WEST INDIES

    Thomas Piatkowski, 7/21/17

    Sara Ward, 7/17/17

    COUNTRY OF SERVICE NOT SPECIFIED

    John Arevalo, 7/16/17

    Charles Arnold, 6/12/17

    George Edgar Branson, 6/27/17

    Jennifer Clarke, 7/10/17

    Richard Guay, 7/15/17

    John Sharp, 7/12/17 

    Timothy L. Sullivan, 6/13/17

    Nelda Wren, 7/20/17

    Frank Wanning, 7/3/17

  • Jonathan Pearson posted an article
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    From long standing public servants, to an icon of the civil rights movement, to an early Silicon Valley entrepreneur, to a late-in-life volunteer who was among the oldest to serve in the Peace Corps. So many impressive members of the Peace Corps community passed away in recent weeks and months. We remember them here.

     

    She served as a special assistant to four Peace Corps directors between 1976 and 1982, and is credited with quadrupling the number of women and minorities appointed as country directors and senior staff. But that wasn’t the first Peace Corps encounter for Nancy A. Graham (1926 – 2018). That came in 1963, when she and her family accompanied Nancy’s husband Richard, when he served as country director in Tunisia for two years. During that time, Nancy worked at an orphanage and organized dinners and events for Peace Corps volunteers and Tunisian diplomats. Nancy’s long list of achievements began in the early 1950’s when she served as President of the Planned Parenthood chapter in Milwaukee, and helped found the Milwaukee Book Club. In the 1980’s she co-founded the Institute for Soviet American Relations and served as executive director of the organization from 1986 to 1990. She also served as the national coordinator of Peace Links and deputy director of education programs at the National Urban Coalition.

     

    LeRoy Frasier (1937 – 2017) joined the Peace Corps and served in Malawi from 1964 – 1966. However, what he is most remembered for came several years before his Peace Corps service. In 1955, following the Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court decision (from the previous year), LeRoy, his brother Ralph and high school friend John Lewis Brandon became among the first African-American undergraduate students to challenge segregation at the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill. The university rejected their application until a federal judge overturned the decision and ordered the young men to be admitted. Frasier endured racism and hostility from many students, faculty and administrators during his three years at UNC. Ralph Frasier left UNC to join the Army while Leroy joined the Peace Corps. Both later completed their education at what is now North Carolina Central University. UNC established  a scholarship program to honor the three men. Upon his death in the closing days of 2017, the university said Leroy "was a true pioneer and historic figure in Carolina’s history and his legacy of leadership, courage and self-sacrifice made a lasting impact on our university community. LeRoy’s contributions to Carolina will live on through our students who receive scholarships bearing his name.”

     

    After graduating from Yale University and serving with the Peace Corps in India, Frank Heintz (1944-2018) began a long and meaningful career in public service.  He taught in Baltimore City Schools before being elected to the Maryland House of Delegates.  During his career as a state delegate, Frank earned a law degree from the University of Maryland.  He then served as a Baltimore City Councilor, Executive Director of the Employment Security Administration, and Chairman of the Public Service Commission.  Later, he worked and retired as the President and CEO of Baltimore Gas and Electric.  Frank was also active in his church, where he was the treasurer and taught Sunday school.

     

    He was the first Peace Corps Country Director in Honduras. But Thomas Walz (1933 - 2018) was best known for being a champion of the rights for the disabled. Tom obtained his Masters in Social Work from St. Louis University and a PhD from the University of Minnesota, where he was hired as a professor. He later became the Director of the University of Iowa School of Social Work, a position he held for five years. He remained on the University of Iowa faculty until his retirement. Following his retirement, he founded and directed two non-profits dedicated to improving the lives of disadvantaged individuals living in the Iowa City area. Upon his death, a feature story in the Iowa Press-Citizen newspaper highlights the depth of Tom's community work in support of the disabled.

     

    While India was her country of service, Sudan would also hold a special place later in the life of Diane King (1943-2018). Diane earned a degree in political science from Ohio Wesleyan University and a master's degree in counseling from the University of Pittsburgh.  Afterwards, served with the Peace Corps in India, inspired by the words of John F. Kennedy.  Following her service in India, she traveled elsewhere in Asia, eventually settling in New York where she was a school counselor for over 30 years.  Diane became a strong advocate for charities in Sudan, such as the Walking Boys of Sudan and Water for South Sudan.  She helped establish the organization Building Minds in South Sudan, and also published a children's book titled "Child of Sand and Water".

     

    She passed away twelve days short of her 99th birthday. And it wasn't so long ago that she was serving in the Peace Corps. Beatrice Veronica Grossman (1919 - 2018) was 81 when she joined the Peace Corps in 2001 as a volunteer in Romania. That wasn't the only accomplishment through which Beatrice proved one is never too old. She became a student at Cal State Fullerton, graduating with a degree in economics at the age of 78. This followed a 25 year career with the Pamona Division of General Dynamics, where she was one of the first to apply Parametric estimating as an estimating tool.

     

    The education of Albert Horley (1936 - 2018) included a Bachelors of Science from the Carnegie Institute of Technology, a Masters in Physics from Harvard University and  PhD in Communications Systems Planning from Stanford University. In between these achievements, he answered President Kennedy's call to service, joining the Peace Corps in Malaysia. Albert started a Physics Department at the Technical Institute of Malaysia, where he and students launched the first full-size satellite ground station in Southeast Asia. In 1970, Albert began six years of employment in Washington with the Department of Health, Education and Welfare. Then, it was back to the west coast and Silicon Valley, where he helped co-found the satellite communications company Vitalink. He later formed another startup, Vitacom.

     

    Below is our In Memoriam list for members of the Peace Corps community who recently passed away:

     

    STAFF

    Phyllis Draper, 1/25/18

    Nancy A. Graham (1976 - 82), 1/12/18

    Mary Goggins Miles, 2/11/18

    Edward Slevin, 1/18/18

    MULTIPLE COUNTRIES

    Richard Lynn Chitwood Ukraine/Russia, 2/16/18

    Mary Froehlich Ghana/Libya, 1/17/18

    AFGHANISTAN

    Ronald DiOrio, 1/19/18

    Elaine Woods (1965-67), 2/5/18

    BRAZIL

    Bernard Blanche (1965-67), 1/25/18

    George Coleman (staff), 12/10/17

    Kathleen (Kaharick) Maneese, 1/26/18

    Manuel Vega Palacin, 2/6/18

    CAMEROON

    George Glaros (1965-67), 1/27/18

    CHILE

    Gerald Gogan, 1/17/18

    CHINA

    Frances Bentley, 1/11/18

    COLOMBIA

    William G. Morris, 1/11/18

    DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

    David Kaufman (1962-64), 1/6/18

    Cathi Kroon (1967-69), passed away late 2017

    Edward Junior Warmoth (1985-87), 1/26/18

    ECUADOR

    Lydia Ann Abell Gibson,  posted 1/24/18

    ETHIOPIA

    Leslie Frankfurt, 1/18/18

    FIJI

    Jacob Zawacki (staff), 1/20/18

    GABON

    Eugene "Geno" Torres (1963-65), 2/5/18

    THE GAMBIA

    Margaret M. Grant, 2/1/18

    HONDURAS

    Thomas John Hebert (1989), 1/30/18

    Ellen Donna "Cookie" Rocklin Izaguirre (1973-75; staff various years 1975 - 2000), 1/26/18

    Thomas Walz (Country Director 1962-64), 2/10/18

    INDIA

    Frank Heintz (1966-68), 1/24/18

    Diane Dickerson King (1965-67), 1/25/18

    David Swope (1967-69), posted 2/4/18

    JAMAICA

    Irwin Saul Loibman (1968-70), 2/6/18

    KENYA

    Edward C. Nichols, 2/4/18

    LIBERIA

    William R. Morris, 1/15/18

    Phyliss Sigetti (1977-79), 1/26/18

    Kathleen A. Simon (1981-84), 2/18/18

    MALAWI

    LeRoy Frasier (1964-66), 12/29/17

    John Timothy O'Donnell, 12/30/17

    MALAYSIA

    Albert Horley (1963-65), 1/14/18

    Mike O'Rourke, 1/22/18

    MICRONESIA

    Dean Lawrence Peterson, 1/25/18

    MOROCCO

    Donna Mary Burns, 1/25/18

    NIGERIA

    Doris Frances Denning (1964-66), 1/3/18

    OMAN

    Gary Meserole (1979-81), 2/8/18

    PANAMA

    Mateo Johnson, posted 2/7/18

    PAKISTAN

    Susan Elizabeth Wedemeyer, 2/9/18

    PHILIPPINES

    Mary Ann Kojis-Zopp, 2/16/18

    Michael James Morse, 1/29/18

    Lorraine "Lori" Siegmann (1968-69), 2/10/18

    M. Deane Wylie, 1/30/18

    POLAND

    Miriam Richter, 2/5/18

    ROMANIA

    Beatrice Veronica Grossman (2001-03), 2/11/18

    SENEGAL

    Jamie E. Gill (2010-12), 1/2/18

    SIERRA LEONE

    Joseph Flicek, 1/25/18

    Daniel Keil, 1/13/2018

    Norman Munroe (1989-91), 1/19/18

    SOUTH AFRICA

    Jay Robert Atherton (1999 - 2001), 1/28/18

    TANZANIA

    Ron Hert (1966-68), 2/3/18

    Kenneth Spitzer, 2/6/18

    THAILAND

    Edmund H. Clark, 10/19/17

    Lucia Wilcox, 1/11/18

    TOGO

    John Wilson (1981-84), 1/25/18

    COUNTRY OF SERVICE NOT SPECIFIED

    David George Fonesca, 12/18/17

    Joseph Michael Gauthier, 2/5/18

    Mildred Green, 2/17/18

    Stephen J. Green, 1/30/18

    Lola Law, 1/13/18

     

     

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    An iconic country music songwriter. An RPCV whose journey to the Peace Corps began in Nazi Germany. Leaders in the fields of mediation and conflict resolution.

    There's a long, lifetime of accomplishments among those we honor who recently passed away, and we are especially saddened by the untimely death of a serving volunteer.

     

    The Peace Corps community mourns the recent death of Bernice Heiderman (1993 - 2018), who passed away suddenly while serving as a volunteer in Comoros. A graduate of the University of Illinois at Chicago, Bernice was an education volunteer, teaching English at a junior high school on the island of Grand Comore. Her work included starting a Junior Explorers Club, through which she introduced students to sites in their country they had never seen before. Prior to Peace Corps, Bernice was a Discovery Squad volunteer at the Field Museum, where she was a photography assistant.

     

    According to Rolling Stone magazine, entertainer Nanci Griffith referred to Richard Dobson (1942 - 2017) as "the Hemingway of Country Music". Born in Tyler, Texas, Richard moved with his family to the Netherlands at the age of eight. He began to take piano lessons. Twelve years later, he was playing guitar and would soon join the Peace Corps, serving in Chile. Following Peace Corps Richard moved to Nashville, and would live between Music City and his native Texas for three decades. He became a songwriter to the stars, including Griffith (who recorded The Ballad of Robert Winter-Smith), Johnny and June Carter Cash (Baby Ride Easy), Guy Clark (Old Friends) and many more. Along with music, Richard was a published writer whose works included The Gulf Coast Boys and Pleasures of the High Rhine: A Texas Singer in Exile. The latter reflected on Richard's life in Switzerland, where he lived with his wife since 1999.

     

    The family of Edward Lee Becker (1935 - 2017) estimate during his 50 years as an educator, he taught over 10,000 students on three continents. Edward's teaching career began in New Orleans. Eleven years later he traveled to Manila for a year of teaching. Then it was onto California where he embarked on a 25 year career at the Fortuna and East High School systems. He would become Director at East High, and concluded his teaching at Fortuna High as Director of the Independent School Program. Edward was very active in civic and professional affairs, including a stint as President of the Fortuna Union High School Teachers Association and as a member of the Rohnerville School District. He also served as a member of the Fortuna Planning Commission, President of the the Camp Fire Boys and Girls Club, and a Board member at Humboldt State University. After concluding his work in Fortuna, Edward joined the Peace Corps in 1995, where he continued his work as a teacher in Slovakia.

     

    After earning a degree in teaching from Wayne State University, Myra Strachan MacDonald (1939 - 2017) taught briefly in Detroit public schools.  Soon after, she began training with the Peace Corps and subsequently served in Nigeria from 1963 to 1964 as a teacher.  Dedicating her life to teaching, she returned to school and earned her MAT in special education.  She was deeply involved in community programs focused on nonviolent social change. At various points in her life, she was active with the Unitarian Church, the Nuclear Freeze Movement, and PFLAG. She also earned her M.A in Psychology and worked as a therapist. Later in life, Myra worked in private practice, helping men who had been convicted of domestic violence to learn non-violent methods of resolving conflict.
     

    A citizen of Germany prior to World War II, Karl Eymert (1928 - 2017) was forced to join a people’s militia established by the Nazis in the final days of the war. He was later captured by the Russians but escaped and was eventually reunited with family members in Altenwalde, Germany. Karl found work at a US Army base and was befriended by a U.S. soldier who married Karl's sister, and sponsored both as they moved to southern California. Karl joined the US Army and was stationed in Berlin, working at Checkpoint Charlie as an interpreter, military police officer, and courier.   After serving in the military, he returned to California and worked with the National Forest Service and worked as a ranger.  After his retirement, Karl served in Costa Rica with the Peace Corps for two years.  Shortly following his service there,   he worked as a tour guide in California.  He traveled to many different countries and could speak German and Spanish fluently.


    Roger C.Wolf was graduate of Harvard College and the George Washington University School of Law. He served as as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Tunisia from 1962 to 1964, and dedicated his life to service to others.  He taught for 30 years at the University of Maryland Law School.  He spent many years studying mediation and training students to be mediators and conducted training programs in Maryland for lawyers and judges.  He was a trailblazer in the field of mediation, by drafting standards for ethics and practices.  His extensive work in these fields was recognized when Roger received the Chief Judge Robert Bell Award for Outstanding Contribution to Alternative Dispute Resolution in Maryland 2007. He was also honored as a Leader in the Law in 2004. Along with the law, Roger was also a passionate farmer, tending to 10 acres of wine grapes, Christmas trees, a large flock of sheep, and cattle. He was a founding board member of the Maryland Grape Growers Association' and was appointed by the Governor to the Maryland State Winery & Grape Grower Advisory Board.

     

    After receiving his Masters Degree in Mechanical Engineering at the University of California - Davis in 1967, Jerry Allin Brownfield (1942 - 2017) and his wife Beth joined the Peace Corps, serving in Honduras for two years. Following his Peace Corps service, Jerry was hired to work for the General Mills company in Minnesota. In 1971, he began a 30-year career with the Minneapolis based transport refrigeration company Thermo King. Two of his years with Thermo King took Jerry, Beth and their family to Ireland. In 2004, Jerry and Beth moved to Bellingham, Washington where he was active in the community, serving as a volunteer with the Whatcom Dispute Resolution Center and member of the city's Human Rights Film Festival Task Force.

     

    Below is our In Memoriam list for members of the Peace Corps community who recently passed away:

     

    STAFF

    Ward J. Cromer, 11/17/17

    Lionel Epstein, 4/5/17

    John G. Hay (Kenya), 12/14/17

    Stuart Stegner (Ecuador/Venezuela), 12/14/17

    AFGHANISTAN

    William Richard Hicks (1963-65), 12/26/17

    BELIZE

    Mary O'Connor, 12/12/17

    BENIN

    Judith A. Rooney, 12/20/17

    BOLIVIA

    David Navarre Reif-Snyder, 12/27/17

    CAMEROON

    Susan E. Anthony, 1/3/18

    CHILE

    Richard Dobson, 12/16/17

    CHINA

    Sidney Smith III, 12/28/17

    COLOMBIA

    Bruce Charles Ogden (1964), 12/14/17

    COMOROS

    Bernice Heiderman, 1/9/2018

    COSTA RICA

    Thomas Cernigliaro, 1/1/18

    Karl Heinz Eymert (1984-86), 12/29/17

    ECUADOR

    Blanche Ligare Lindmark, 12/25/17

    ETHIOPIA

    Anthony Funicello, 10/8/17

    GHANA

    Scott Carter (1962-64), 12/11/17

    HONDURAS

    Jerry Allin Brownfield (1967-69), 12/7/17

    INDIA

    Norma Goel (1964-1966), 12/31/17

    William S. Seeley (1966-68), 1/1/18

    LESOTHO

    Susanne Emily Oldham, 1/1/18

    LIBERIA

    Stannette E. Malosky, 12/15/17

    LIBYA

    Randall Melquist (1968-70), 12/10/17

    MALAWI

    Florence M. Johnson, 12/6/17

    Mary Kin (1966-68), 12/16/17

    MALAYSIA

    Sarah Marie Cimino, 12/24/17

    MOROCCO

    Mary E. (Kane) Murphy (2010-12), posted 1/3/18

    NIGERIA

    Margaret DeBruhl (1993-95), 1/3/18

    Myra S. MacDonald (1963-64), 11/28/17

    PARAGUAY

    Delores H. Ramirez (1989-92), 12/28/17

    PHILIPPINES

    Warren LeRoy Bennett, 12/22/17

    SIERRA LEONE

    E. Jane Hards (1986-1989), 1/6/18

    Martha D. Peterson (1968-70), 12/29/17

    SLOVAKIA

    Edward Lee Becker (mid 1990's), posted 12/24/17

    ST. LUCIA

    Margaret Cassidy (1970-1971), 1/6/18

    SWAZILAND

    May Sutton (1982-1985), 1/6/18

    TANZANIA

    Gilbert Solis (1965-67), 12/7/17

    THAILAND

    Patricia Rose Hughes (1971-74), 12/21/17

    TUNISIA

    Malcolm E. Wetherbee, 12/26/17

    Roger C. Wolf (1962-64), 12/30/17

    COUNTRY OF SERVICE NOT SPECIFIED

    Henry Beasley, 12/9/17

    Robert John Haas, 12/21/17

    Steven Rioff, 1/2/18

    Robert Simi, 12/11/17

     

     

     

      

     

  • Jonathan Pearson posted an article
    We remember those in our community who recently died. see more

    Among those members of the Peace Corps community who passed away in the past several weeks were a number of outstanding public servants and teachers, who devoted their lives to the betterment of others.

     

    Roger Landrum was a champion of service and an early leader as the first wave of returning Peace Corps Volunteers began to organize into a national movement. A member of the first group of volunteers to serve in Nigeria in 1961, Roger - as President of the Washington DC Returned Peace Corps Volunteers - became deeply involved in the organization of the 25th anniversary celebration of Peace Corps service. One of the outcomes of this national gathering was the substantial growth of geographic and country-of-service RPCV groups, and the mobilization of community members to carry out the third-goal of the Peace Corps. Roger worked closely with Harris Wofford, Theodore Hesburgh and others in promoting national service initiatives. Along with his commitment to the Peace Corps, Roger also made his mark as the founding president of Youth Service America and Youth Service International.

     

    Following three years of service as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Nigeria and Liberia, Dr. Frederick "Rick" E. Machmer Jr. (1940 - 2017), embarked on a long and distinguished career in the U.S. foreign service. Over a 35 year period, Dr. Machmer was a USAID Mission Director at overseas posts in Afghanistan, Ethiopia, Georgia, Lebanon, Nepal, Somalia and Sudan. He also served as Director of the USAID/Washington Office of Middle East Affairs. His numerous awards in service to his nation included a 2001 State Department Group Meritorious Honor Award for "outstanding sustained effort to prevent a human catastrophe in Ethiopia." In 1992, President George H.W. Bush honored Dr. Machmer with the Presidential Meritorious Honor Award. He also received USAID's Superior Honor Award in 1985, and Distinguished Honor Award in 1988.

     

    Teaching was the career path chosen by Benjamin Harrison Thomas (1941 - 2017) following two years of Peace Corps service in Ethiopia. Benjamin became a teacher at the Sidwell Friends School in Washington DC for 24 years. From there, he helped found the Thornton Friends School in nearby Silver Spring. After 30 years in education, Benjamin moved to Ukiah, California. He became a member of the Ukiah City Council, serving two four-year terms. His other wide-ranging community endeavors included involvement with Ukiah community radio, membership on Ukiah's Poet Laureate Committee, participation in the Ukiah Haiku Festival and mentoring in the Partnership Scholars program.

     

    Teaching was also the career path of Cynthia Jo Picou (1943 - 2017). In her case, the teaching of law. Born and raised in Louisiana, Cynthia attended Louisiana State University before joining the Peace Corps. She organized a literacy campaign while serving as a volunteer in Medellin, Colombia with efforts to raise money to buy books for the people of the Simon Bolivar barrio. Following Peace Corps, Cynthia returned to LSU for her law degree. This would lead to a thirty year career teaching law as a professor at Southern University Law Center. She traveled for three months as an exchange professor in the country of Georgia and also went to Bosnia during the post-war peace efforts.

     

    Climbing Mount Kilimanjaro was the greatest thrill for Randolph F. Lowe (1945 - 2017), who accomplished the feat in the course of his Peace Corps service in Ghana from 1968 - 70. After returning to the U.S., Randolph worked for nearly thirty years at the U.S. Labor Department, culminating in his role as the USDOL's Director of Administration. He closed out his career with ten years of work with Union Bank as a Senior Vice President Diversity Officer and Employment Manager. Upon his retirement, Randolph's service included several years as a member of the Palm Springs Planning Commission and serving as Chairman of the Board of the LGBTQ Community Center of the Desert. 

     

    In the 1970's John Sommer worked with the Ford Foundation in New Dehli, followed by senior positions in Washington with the Peace Corps and USAID. His extensive involvement in international development led John to Vermont, where he served as Dean of the Study Abroad Program at the School of International Training (SIT) from 1981-1999, John's first personal exploration of the world began as a volunteer building schools in South Vietnam through International Voluntary Services. He co-wrote a his book, Viet Nam-The Unheard Voices. To honor his efforts at SIT, a scholarship was established in his name. In 2001, John served as Vice President of Eisenhower Fellowships, based in Philadelphia, an exchange program for emerging world leaders.

     

    Below is our In Memoriam list for members of the Peace Corps community who recently passed away:

     

    STAFF

    Siaosi Enosi, 9/27/17

    John Sommer (1977-79), 11/11/17

    M. Paul Zimmerman (1966-71), 11/20/17

    MULTIPLE COUNTRIES

    Albert Glosser -Chile/Peru, 11/15/17

    Rick Machmer Jr -Nigeria/Liberia (1966-68), 11/18/17

    AFGHANISTAN

    Leo Ehrensberger (1965-67), 11/28/17

    BARBADOS

    Charles Cademartori (1970-73), 11/20/17

    BRAZIL

    Janis Calmes, 11/14/17

    COLOMBIA

    Cynthia Picou, 11/11/17

    ETHIOPIA

    Joan Flora Moran Girija, 10/31/17

    Benjamin Harrison Thomas (1962-64), 11/14/17

    GHANA
    John Kihorany, 11/8/17

    Randy Lowe (1968-70), 11/23/17

    GUATEMALA

    Gloria Larson (1972-74), 11/28/17

    INDIA

    Joseph MacNeil (staff 1968), posted 21/11/17

    JAMAICA

    Lorraine McNally (1991-93), 11/26/17

    Carol Judith Oltchick (1962-64), 12/6/17

    KENYA

    Alfred Goodale, 11/10/17

    Craig J. Tieszen (1971-75), 11/22/17

    LIBERIA

    Charles Douglas Norman (1987-89), 12/2/17

    MALAWI

    Patrick Easter, 11/29/17

    MALI

    Kelley Loren Kyle, 11/2/17

    MARSHALL ISLANDS

    Ross S. Taylor (1966-68), 11/16/17

    MOROCCO

    Diane Ponasik, 11/17/17

    NIGERIA

    Roger Landrum (1961-63), 12/9/17

    PANAMA

    Ruth M. Fitzpatrick (1965-67), 11/23/17

    PERU

    Richard Reinhart (1963-65), 11/13/17

    SENEGAL 

    Mary O'Kelly, 11/29/17

    VENEZUELA

    Edward Lawrence Ballen, 11/25/17

    Gulden Godfrey Lloyd (1965-66), 11/17/17

    COUNTRY OF SERVICE NOT SPECIFIED

    Mark Alan, 12/3/17

    Carmine DiStasio (1976-79), 12/2/17

    Helen Harms, 11/28/17

    William Francis Melvin, 11/22/17

    Susan Schoenberger, 11/11/17

    Jerry Walter, 11/1/17

     

     

     

     

  • Jonathan Pearson posted an article
    An early leader of the Peace Corps community has passed away. see more

    National Peace Corps Association and the Peace Corps community mourn the passing of Roger Landrum, who died early on Saturday, December 9, at his Washington, D.C. home following a brief illness.

    Roger was a central figure in the creation of what is now the National Peace Corps Association.  In his career in Washington, D.C. Landrum also became a leader in the national service movement, becoming the founding president of Youth Service America and the later Youth Service International.

    For several decades Roger worked closely with the Ford, Kellogg, and Mott foundations, and other philanthropies that supported non-government movement to offer voluntary community service in programs modeled after the Peace Corps. He worked closely with other champions of national service, including Senator Harris Wofford and Father Theodore Hesburgh.

    Roger was dedicated to the notion that all young people find their voice, take action, and make an impact on vital community issues. He helped lead efforts resulting in the passage of the National and Community Service Acts of 1990 and 1993. For this work, Roger was recognized by his alma mater – Albion College – with an Honorary Doctorate in Public Service. Before his death, he endowed a fellowship program for students at the college.

    Roger served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Nigeria from 1961 to 1963 (Nigeria One) and became the subject of a popular documentary, “Give Me a Riddle,” that was filmed by a close friend and fellow Nigeria volunteer, David Schickele. 

    Seven years after the formation in Iowa of the National Peace Corps Association (originally known as the National Council of Returned Peace Corps Volunteers) Roger, as president of the RPCVs of Washington, D.C., played a lead role in the celebration of the 25th anniversary of the Peace Corps. The 1986 gathering drew more than 5,000 Returned Peace Corps Volunteers to the nation's capital. As Roger wrote in a blog post published on the Peace Corps Worldwide website, “The most enduring impact of the 25th anniversary conference was engaging the growing number of Returned Peace Corps Volunteers as an organized force supporting the three goals of the Peace Corps.”

    As NPCA affiliate groups continue to serve as a major force in our community, a quantum leap in development occurred in the immediate aftermath of the anniversary conference, where the number of affiliated groups of RPCVs surged from a handful to over 100.

    "Roger was a pivotal figure in the history of NPCA" says NPCA President & CEO Glenn Blumhorst. "He personified a lifelong commitment to Peace Corps ideals, and his legacy of leadership through service will long be remembered by the Peace Corps community." 

    Along with a longstanding commitment to service above self, Roger also excelled in the field of photography. During his Peace Corps service, he grew increasingly interested in photography, resulting in work and recognition in fine art photography. In 2008, Roger received the Prix de la Photographie Paris. He was a first-place winner in the 2008 International Photography Awards (IPA) and received further recognition for his work by the IPA in 2009.

     

     

  • Jonathan Pearson posted an article
    We remember those in the Peace Corps community who passed away in recent weeks. see more

    Returned Peace Corps Volunteers and former Peace Corps staff do more than bring the world home to fellow citizens in the United States. More often than not, they come home to become community leaders. At times, they stay or return overseas to share their talents. Either way, the many industrious members of our community who recently passed away are examples of an ongoing commitment to serving others, in a wide variety of ways.

     

    Government and politics. Writing, the arts and education. Those are some of the highlights and achievements central to the life of Barry Martin Bergh (1944 – 2017). A graduate of Kenyon College and the University of Michigan graduate school, Barry’s professional career began as an aide to former Michigan Governor George Romney during his presidential campaign. That was followed by a position as deputy assistant to New York City Mayor John Lindsay. Barry served in Washington with the Director of Peace Corps as a speech writer, and later as an assistant to the Director of the Environmental Protection Agency. In 1978, he joined the faculty of the Haverford School. He taught English at the school for the next twenty-two years. Along with teaching, he was advisor to the school newspaper, Chairman of the Curriculum Committee and President of the Cum Laude Society. Barry also enjoyed performing on the stage, participating in productions of the operas of Gilbert and Sullivan and playing the role of Willy Loman in Arthur Miller’s advisor to the school newspaper, Chairman of the Curriculum Committee and President of the Cum Laude Society. Barry also enjoyed performing on the stage, participating in productions of the operas of Gilbert and Sullivan and playing the role of Willy Loman in Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman.

     

    Along with being a Peace Corps Volunteer, teaching high school biology in Kenya from 1974 – 78, Frances Steadman (1920 – 2017) was a committed activist for a number of causes.  That commitment led to the Marin (CA) Human Rights Commission to bestow upon Frances its Community Service Award in 1996. Two years later, she was inducted into the Marin Women’s Hall of Fame.  Before her induction, she was quoted as saying “I’m almost embarrassed at being nominated, but I accept because I like to have the causes I work for be validated”. Frances worked on issues such as nuclear disarmament, civil rights, immigrant rights and sanctuary for individuals fleeing Central American death squads. She was active with the Marin Interfaith Task Force on the Americas, the Gray Panthers and the Marin Coalition for Immigrant Rights.

     

    Thomas Duane Mandeville (1942 – 2017) was an early Peace Corps Volunteer, serving in Afghanistan shortly after graduating from the University of Illinois in 1964. Upon returning to the U.S., Tom attended the University of Michigan, graduating with a Master’s degree in social work. He worked as a community social worker in Flint for two years, then worked the following three years as a social worker in the Rockford, Illinois school system. It was in 1972 that Tom, his wife Donna (who he met during Peace Corps service) and their children moved to Sendai, Japan as pioneers for the Bahai’ faith. He established New Day School for teaching English as a second language. Tom, along with Donna were highly regarded within the Bahai’ community of northern Japan. Over 45 years he and staff at his school taught English to hundreds of students. He also co-authored a workbook used to teach English.

     

    Like many who served in the Peace Corps, Elinor Abdulla (1940 – 2017) had a love of language. Throughout her life, she studied up to ten languages and at different times taught four (French, Spanish, Greek and Latin). Following graduation in 1962 from Hiram College, Elinor moved to Washington DC, working for the government as a budget analyst by day, while attending graduate school by night at George Washington University. In 1966, Elinor joined the Peace Corps, serving as a history teacher in Tanzania. She married and remained in the country for twenty-one years, raising a family and working as a bank manager, management analyst and marketing manager for Pepsi-Cola. Elinor returned to the U.S. in the 1990’s, primarily teaching English as a Second Language first in Albany New York, and later in McAllen Texas. Another of Elinor’s longstanding contributions was service as a church organist/pianist in the communities where she lived, from age twelve until the end of her life.

     

    Between graduation from DePauw University, a graduate degree at the University of Notre Dame and a law degree from Indiana University, Frederick F. Thornburg (1940 – 2017) served as a Peace Corps teacher and coach in Colombia. Frederick was appointed as the Law Clerk to the late John S. Hastings, Chief Judge of the United States Court of Appeals in Chicago. He next entered the world of business, serving as Executive Vice President and Chief Administrative Officer of the Wackenhut Corporation. The last phase of Frederick’s multi-faceted career came when he served as Vice President of Institutional Advancement and General Counsel for St. Thomas University. During his retirement, Frederick served fifteen years with the Miami-Dade County School System. This work included chairing the budget and finance committee and ethics committee. He also served on the Board for the South Florida-based Public Broadcasting Service radio and television stations.

     

    Volunteerism and community service were paramount in the life of Richard Wayne Bowers (1942 – 2017) who served in the Peace Corps in Sierra Leone from 1964 to 1966. A graduate of Catawba College, Richard returned to North Carolina following his service and obtained a graduate degree in School Administration from East Carolina University. This led to a thirty-year career as a teacher and principal. For several years following his retirement, Richard worked for Craven Community College teaching GED courses at the Craven County Correctional Facility in Vanceboro. Richard served on the Vanceboro Board of Aldermen since 1982. He was Secretary/Treasurer of the Vanceboro Rotary Club for 41 years. An active member of Holly Hill Pentecostal Holiness Church, Richard served a variety of needs including Sunday School teacher and Superintendent, deacon and member of the church administrative council. Other civic roles included stints on the Board of Directors of the Vanceboro Rural Volunteer Fire Department, the Vanceboro Library and the Vanceboro Medical Center.

     

    Below is our In Memoriam list for members of the Peace Corps community who recently passed away:

     

    STAFF

    Barry Bergh, 9/1/17

    William Healey, 9/9/17

    Arnetia Sampson Maasha, 9/8/17

    MULTIPLE COUNTRIES

    Janet Chiyo Miyamae - Nigeria/Ethiopia, 7/24/17

    Clarice Douoguih- Guinea/Togo, 9/1/17

    AFGHANISTAN

    Thomas Mandeville, 8/10/17

    BRAZIL

    Bob Arthur, 9/1/17

    Marilyn Henderson-Parker, 9/4/17

    Mary Woodward Pillsworth (1964-67), 4/11/17

    CAMEROON

    Taylor Moore (1993-95), 9/7/17

    CHILE

    Ted Cass, 7/30/17

    COLOMBIA

    Ernest Chabot (1963-65), 9/9/17

    George DeWald, 8/14/17

    Frederick Thornburg, 9/19/17

    COSTA RICA

    Ronald Sanchez, 9/22/17

    ECUADOR 

    Richard Pelczar (1964-66), 9/29/17

    Dolores Polson (1992-94), 9/25/17

    Donna Scroggins (1967-69), 9/29/17

    EL SALVADOR

    James Carr, 9/2/17

    ETHIOPIA

    Paul Fahey, 9/12/17

    GABON

    Pete Cross (1983-85), 9/19/17

    HONDURAS

    Carl Ault, 3/17/17

    Alexandra Chewning, 9/19/17

    Joan Cookson (1976-78), 6/21/17

    Judy Luna (1978-80), 9/28/17

    INDIA

    Edward O. Hepner (1965-67), 7/8/17

    Janet Bingham-Clark (1965-67), 2/7/17

    IRAN

    Roger Hartman (1964-66), 9/7/17

    William Lirange (1967-68), 9/11/17

    KENYA

    Frances Steadman, 10/1/17

    LIBERIA

    Phyllis Hassinger, 9/14/17

    NAMIBIA

    Gerry Carleton, 9/30/17

    NEPAL

    Daniel Kucij (1965-67), 9/23/17

    NIGER

    Wendy Wallin (1967-69), 11/11/16

    NIGERIA

    Richard Priebe, 6/9/17

    Robert Dahlin (1964-66), 4/10/17

    Dale Musolf (1964-66), 3/13/17

    PAPUA NEW GUINEA

    David Shelden, 9/30/17

    PERU

    Duane Elg (1966-68), 3/30/17

    David Frederick, 9/14/17

    PHILIPPINES

    Margaret Berner, 9/7/17

    Thomas Kenney (1975-77, 2015), 5/4/17

    Lonnie Laack, 9/11/17

    POLAND

    Helen Suchara (1989-92), 7/27/17

    SIERRA LEONE

    Richard Bowers (1964-66), 10/7/17

    Bob Dach (1988-90), 7/3/17

    TANZANIA

    Elinor Abdulla (1966-68), 9/25/17

    Mark Miyamoto (1993-95), 10/1/17

    THAILAND

    Betty Anne West (1984-86, 1992-95), 9/1/17

    TOGO

    Sandra Scavazzon, 9/9/17

    COUNTRY OF SERVICE NOT SPECIFIED

    J. Michael Blais, 9/19/17

    Arnold Cook, 9/28/17

    Inez Edmondson, 9/9/17 

    William Fisher, 9/20/17

    John Ford, 10/3/17

    Charles William Lawrence Jr. (1973-75), 9/9/17

    Linda Popper, 9/15/17

    Thomas Turner, 9/20/17