In Memoriam

  • Jonathan Pearson posted an article
    We honor those who served in Peace Corps who recently died. see more

    Among those members of our community who recently passed away, we honor those who excelled in government, politics, education, agriculture, and public and community service.
     

    Mary Ziegenhagen (1936-2020) was born in Illinois, moved to Minnesota, and received training as an accredited medical records technician. Then moved to Washington, D.C. in 1960 to work on the staff of Minnesota Senator Eugene McCarthy. In 1962, she joined the first Peace Corps staff in the Philippines as an assistant to the director. Mary returned to Washington to work as an assistant for another Minnesotan, Hubert Humphrey, when he served as vice president under Lyndon Johnson. In the late 1960s, Mary accompanied her husband David to Western Samoa when David was named director of that country’s Peace Corps program. Returning to Minnesota, Mary started a community newspaper in her suburban basement. That endeavor grew to a chain of five papers serving seven suburbs of Minneapolis. She also served on the editorial board of the Minneapolis Star. Retiring to Cloverdale, Minnesota, Mary headed the town’s annual fiddle festival for several years. She also served as chair of the board of the town History Center, which included guiding the center through its recent expansion.

     

    Hugh Parmer (1939–2020) spent his public service both in the federal and state level. Born in Fort Worth, Parmer earned an undergraduate degree from Yale and a master’s from the University of Texas-Arlington. He was elected to serve in the Texas state House of Representatives in 1962. He was the youngest among his peers to serve in that body, but would leave the legislature in 1966 to work at Peace Corps headquarters at the time of President Lyndon Johnson. He would also work in the U.S. Commerce Department before returning to Texas. In 1977, at age 38, he was elected to be the youngest mayor of Fort Worth. Parmer also served in the Texas Senate. Once again, he returned to Washington to manage disaster relief efforts as part of the Humanitarian Response Bureau of the U.S. Agency for International Development. After his long career in government, Parmer served six years as president of the American Refugee Committee.

     

    Carolyn Hoke “Jill” Johnson (1941-2020) led a life that included a long career as an educator and a variety of connections with Peace Corps. Born in Minnesota, Jill graduated from Northwestern University and moved to Napa, California to become a teacher. This led to positions with the U.S. Army Special Services working in both Korea and Vietnam during the Vietnam War. Shortly after her marriage to Lane Wolcott Johnson, the couple joined the Peace Corps, serving as volunteers in the Philippines from 1970-72. Returning to the U.S., the couple and their family eventually moved to Shelton, Washington. While there, Jill taught ESL to southeast Asian refugees and worked as a community health educator for Planned Parenthood. In 1989, the family moved to Cameroon. While Lane was hired as Peace Corps’ Medical Officer, Jill worked for the United Nations Development Fund and CARE. Peace Corps would later hire Jill to serve as a training director in Morocco, the Central African Republic and the Solomon Islands. Returning to the U.S., Jill was introduced to storytelling at the National Storytelling Festival. This led to a 20-year career as a storyteller with performances, workshops, and recordings all over the U.S. and world.

     

    Christine Janette Dickson (1950-2020) was known for her work in agriculture. Growing up in Panama, California, Christine was active in 4-H, showing dairy cattle and sheep, winning championships at the Kern County Fair, the California State Fair and the Junior Cow Palace. Christine joined the Peace Corps, serving in Belize in the midst of her agriculture studies at Bakersfield College and Colorado State University. Following her service, she concluded her studies as the only woman in her graduating class of agriculture teachers. Her teaching would bring her back to Bakersfield, where she established a high school agriculture department at North High School. She built this program over the next 35 years. In 2017, she became the first female elected to the California Agricultural Teachers Association Hall of Fame. While she “retired”, Christine continued to teach on a part-time basis. She also served as an Agriculture Teacher Trainer in Haiti through a University of California-Davis project to develop an Agriculture Education Program for high school age students in Haiti.

     

    Gerald “Jerry” Catania (1945-2020) was an influential artist and art educator in southwest Michigan. Born in Chicago, Jerry’s family moved to Stevensville, Michigan when he was five years old. After graduating with a Bachelor’s of Fine Arts from the University of Michigan, Jerry joined the Peace Corps in 1969, serving in Barbados. Following Peace Corps, he was one of 30 students selected to go to Seattle’s Pilchuck Glass School where he was taught by Dale Chihuly. Jerry returned to Michigan where he taught art at the Eau Claire and Benton Harbor schools. He also served as adjunct faculty at Lake Michigan College. In 1985, he earned his master’s degree from Western Michigan University, where he did post-graduate work for three years. Over time, he established several art studios across southwest Michigan, teaching art to numerous students over a 30 year period.

     

    Sharon Rindt (1943-2020) was born in a Japanese internment camp in Arizona. After her release, she earned an undergraduate degree from the University of California-Los Angeles, and a master's in Education from Lewis and Clark College. Sharon later joined the Peace Corps, volunteering in Colombia. After returning from her service, she worked as a teacher in the Portland and Gresham school districts. Along with her work, Sharon was an active volunteer, supporting the Sandy Actor’s Theatre, Days for Girls, League for Women Voters, and the Mazamas.

     

    Below is our In Memoriam list for members of the Peace Corps community who recently passed away:

     

    PEACE CORPS STAFF

    Patrick J. Harrington, 5/22/20

    Hugh Parmer (1960s), 5/27/20

     

    MULTIPLE COUNTRIES

    Dr. William Cordtz Ph.D. (Belize/Tonga 1980s), 5/10/20

    Jane Frances Hogan (Turkey 1966-67; Malaysia 1967-69)

    Carolyn Hoke Jill Johnson (Philippines 1970-72; Peace Corps Staff Cameroon 1990-91, Morocco 1993, Central African Republic)

     

    AFGHANISTAN

    James A. Keesler (1966-69), 5/22/20

     

    ARMENIA

    Barbara Murray (1994-95), 5/23/20

     

    BARBADOS

    Gerald T. Jerry Catania (1969-71), 5/14/20

     

    BELIZE

    Christine Janette Dickson, 6/8/20

    Susanne Kohrman (1999-2001), 5/21/20

     

    BENIN

    Rhonda Jean Garriott (1981-83), posted 6/16/20

     

    BOLIVIA

    Loretta Allen-Adams, 5/18/20

     

    BOTSWANA

    James Licke (1968-70), 5/26/20

     

    BRAZIL

    David Palmer Everton (1964-66), 5/27/20

     

    COLOMBIA

    Sharon Rindt, 4/1/20

    Donald Worms (1977-81), 6/4/20

     

    ECUADOR

    Timothy Roy Kepple (1992-94), 5/25/20

     

    ESWATINI (SWAZILAND)

    Bill Plypow, 5/1/20

     

    ETHIOPIA

    James Edward Born (1962-64), 4/26/20

     

    FEDERATED STATES OF MICRONESIA

    Stephen J. Glassman (1966-68), 5/19/20

     

    GABON

    Glenn A. Dockham (1994-96), 5/28/20

     

    THE GAMBIA

    Jeffrey Lengyel, 5/19/20

     

    HONDURAS

     Boyd Louis Jack Frost  (1964-66), 6/6/20

     

    INDIA

    James Peter Madden (1965-66), 6/5/20

    Michael Dennis OBrien (1974-76), 6/13/20

    Charles Zumbro (1963-65), 5/28/20

     

    JAMAICA

    Dr. Bhavani Manheim (1996-98),  5/2/20

     

    LESOTHO

    Michael Sealey (1974-76), 5/31/20

     

    MALAYSIA

    William J. Dion, 5/22/20

     

    MOROCCO

    Sophie Klausner Zermuehlen (1983-85), 5/7/20

     

    NEPAL

    Francis Sendrowski, 6/2/20

     

    NIGERIA

    Susanne Albert (1962-64), 5/25/20

    Lowell Hart Fewster (1962-64), 5/28/20

    Howard McClain Jr. (1962-64), 5/13/20

     

    PHILIPPINES

    Mary Ziegenhagen (Staff, 1962-64), 5/2/20

     

    SAMOA

    Gay Maurine George (1978-80), 5/28/20

     

    SOUTH KOREA

    Lisa Susan Lindsey (1974-77), 5/21/20

     

    TOGO

    Daniel Wachspress (1978-80), 5/29/20

     

    TUNISIA

     Michael Allan “Mickey Shelton (1968-70), 5/25/20

     

    TURKEY

    John Prejza Jr. (1965-67), 5/21/20

     

    TURKMENISTAN

    John P. McCall (1993-95), 5/22/20

     

    COUNTRY OF SERVICE NOT SPECIFIED

    Temple Bell, 6/8/20

    Jed Hendee, 5/16/20

    John Lothrop (1965-67), 5/20/20

    William M. Quinn, 6/10/20

    Barbara Mary Reising, 5/21/20

    Diane Lee Schwartz, 5/27/20

     


     

     

     

    If you have information you would like to share for our monthly In Memoriam post, contact obituary@peacecorpsconnect.org.

  • Jonathan Pearson posted an article
    We honor members of the Peace Corps community who recently passed away. see more

    Members of the Peace Corps community who recently passed away include key leaders who were there at the beginning of the agency, and a National Football League executive who helped lead his team to its one and only Super Bowl championship.
     

    William Haddad (1928-2020) was a well-known public figure prior to joining Peace Corps at its inception. After serving in the Merchant Marines during World War II and attending Columbia University, Haddad joined the staff of Tennessee Senator Estes Kefauver, and helped secure his nomination for vice president in 1956 on a Democratic ticket led by Adlai Stevenson. In 1957, Haddad was hired by the New York Post, where his reporting on corruption in the city’s housing program contributed to the downfall of Robert Moses and his 40 years as a political power broker. In 1959, Haddad received a George Polk Award, one of journalism’s highest honors. In 1961, Haddad took a leave of absence to help Sargent Shriver form the Peace Corps. For two years, he served as an associate director for the agency and as its first inspector general. After a failed campaign for Congress, Haddad continued to expand his horizons. He was marketing director for the iconic DeLorean automobile, leaving after discovering evidence of financial mismanagement. In the closing years of his career, he worked on efforts to lower the price of prescription drugs.
     

    Richard Paul Thornell (1936-2020) was only 24 years old when Sargent Shriver and Harris Wofford sent him to Ghana as director of the Peace Corps Africa Regional Office. That was only one of the groundbreaking roles Thornell played during his life. A graduate of Fisk University, Thornell became the second black graduate of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University. Along with Peace Corps, Thornell served in the U.S. Army and the U.S. Agency for International Development. A law degree from Yale University soon led Thornell to Howard University, where he taught hundreds of future lawyers over a thirty year career. After the election of Nelson Mandela, Thornell helped launch a partnership between Howard and the nation of South Africa. This partnership included counsel to President Mandela and assistance with a new constitution. Among his many other contributions, Thornell served on the Board of Trustees at Fisk University, general counsel at Howard, special counsel to the Washington bureau of the NAACP, vice chair and counsel of the board of directors of Africare, and member of the board of directors of the YMCA of Metropolitan Washington.
     

    James Edward Blackwell, Ph.D. (1925-2020) was among the first wave of Peace Corps staff to venture to Africa, serving as Acting Country Director of Tanzania from 1963 to 1964, Country Director of Malawi from 1964 to 1966, and directing a major USAID program in Nepal from 1966 to 1969. In Malawi, he was responsible for 265 Peace Corps Volunteers who worked as teachers, public health personnel, agricultural extension, and community development cadre throughout the country. A prolific writer and researcher in sociology, he wrote groundbreaking books including The Black Community: Diversity and Unity and Mainstreaming Outsiders: The Production of Black Professionals. A long-time professor and chair of the Department of Sociology at the University of Massachusetts Boston (1970-1989), he became the first president of the Association of Black Sociologists, and a major consultant to the NAACP Legal Defense Fund and to the Office of the Attorney General for the State of Maryland defending affirmative action programs in higher education. His collected notes and publications are maintained at the Amistad Research Center at Tulane University.  He was the devoted husband to Myrtle Dapremont Blackwell, the “wind beneath his wings,” his constant travel companion and life partner for 53 years, who predeceased him in 2016.
     

    Michael McCaskey (1943-2020), the grandson of the legendary George Halas, died on May 16. McCaskey succeeded his grandfather, and helped lead the Chicago Bears professional football team for nearly 30 years. McCaskey became President and CEO of the Bears from 1983 through 1999. The team’s success included the Bears’ one and only Super Bowl championship in the 1985 season. That season, his peers voted McCaskey as NFL Executive of the Year. From 1999 to 2011, McCaskey transitioned to the role of Chairman of the Board for the team. After graduating from Yale University in 1965, McCaskey served for two years as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Ethiopia. In 2005, McCaskey co-founded the Bears’ charitable organization, which has donated more than $21 million to approximately 100 organizations in greater Chicago in support of education, youth athletics, medicine, and health awareness.
     

    Judith Schlick Pryor (1934-2020) graduated from the University of Minnesota in 1956. Her career included work as a second grade teacher, a corporate trainer, a toy saleswoman, a real estate agent, and a spiritual director. Judith joined Peace Corps service – at age 60 – in Poland in the mid 1990s. At age 70, she earned a master’s degree from St. Catherine University. Judith was an Ignatian Associate and a Master Gardener. She assisted many members of Alcoholics Anonymous over 46 years. She was also active in the Twin City Opera Guild, St. Paul Chamber Orchestra, the Schubert Club, and various women’s groups.
     

    Carol Ann Murphy (1928-2020) was born, raised, and educated in San Francisco, attaining a master’s of arts in education from San Francisco State University. She spent much of her career working abroad for the U.S. Army’s Morale, Welfare, and Recreation Program. While the program was stationed in Seoul, South Korea, Carol also had assignments in France, Germany, and Vietnam. Carol’s service continued stateside, with assignments in Texas, Virginia, and California. It was after her many years of working with the Army, that Carol joined the Peace Corps. She was assigned to Belize, where she helped to run an education center for teachers.

     

    Below is our In Memoriam list for members of the Peace Corps community who recently passed away:

     

    PEACE CORPS STAFF

    James Edward Blackwell, Ph.D. (Tanzania 1963-64; Malawi 1964-66), 1/16/20

    William Haddad (early 1960s), 4/30/20

    Jay Katzen (2000s), 4/9/20

    Richard MacKay, (1990s) 3/26/20

    John Scales, 4/14/20

     

    MULTIPLE COUNTRIES

    Robert Klinger (Turkey; Venezuela), 4/29/20

    George H. Petrides Sr. (Nigeria 1966-67; Botswana 1967-69; Staff 1970-75), 3/6/20

    Richard Nelson Sanders (Colombia 1966-69; Belize 2003; Guatemala 2006), 4/28/20

     

    BANGLADESH

    Duane Dill (1962-64), 4/30/20

     

    BELIZE

    Carol Ann Murphy (1985-88), 5/10/20

     

    BOTSWANA

    Jacqueline Holland, posted 5/7/20

     

    BRAZIL

    William Harrison (1963-64), 4/30/20

    Ann C. Hoskins (1962-64), 4/28/20

    John F. Santos (staff), 5/3/20

     

    COLOMBIA

    William Andrew Most (1978), 5/8/20

    Eugene Roberts Jr. (1964-66), 4/18/20

     

    CYPRUS

    Burton Swanson (1962-64), 4/23/20

     

    DOMINICA

    Barbara Anne (Bell) Goebel (1980-83), 4/21/20

     

    ESWATINI (SWAZILAND)

    Vincent Jerome McCoy (1977-79), 4/12/20

    Michael Joseph Sturm (1970-72), 4/20/20

     

    ETHIOPIA

    Francis Joseph Drejer, 4/22/20

    Michael B. McCaskey (1965-67), 5/16/20

     

    FEDERATED STATES OF MICRONESIA

    Kirk Lamond Gray (1970-71), 5/12/20

     

    FIJI

    Paul W. Celuzza (1968-71), 5/13/20

    Frances Herietta "Tootie" Wesselmann, posted 4/25/20

     

    GUATEMALA

    John Keyes (1990-92), 4/19/20

     

    HAITI

    Shirley J. Pollay (1998), 5/12/20

     

    HONDURAS

    Ann Marie Smith (1967-69), 4/26/20

     

    INDIA

    James Brandt Elston, 5/2/20

     

    IRAN

    Janice Door (1966-68), 4/20/20

     

    JAMAICA

    Donald Clifford Arneson (1989), 4/18/20

    Johanna Timpson, 5/5/20

     

    KIRIBATI

    Ronald P. Fattibene, 4/26/20

     

    LIBERIA

    William O. Weigle (1971-72), 5/5/20

     

    MALAYSIA

    Victor P. Buzdon, 4/23/20

    Robert Reece Highfill (1964-66), 4/22/20

     

    MOROCCO

    Rosemary L. Andrews, 5/16/20

    Susan Kelley-Almeida (1986-88), 5/11/20

    Norm McCarthy, 5/10/20

    Cornelia Schlotter (1963-65), 4/26/20

     

    NIGERIA

    Arlene Foy Reynolds (1966-68), 4/23/20

    Donald Scharfe (1963-65), 4/30/20

     

    PHILIPPINES

    Charles Frederick Dey (Country Director) 1962, 4/16/20

    John J. Larsen (1967-69), 4/28/20

    Erma Anne Perri, 5/2/20

     

    POLAND

    Judith Schlick Pryor (1994-96), 5/4/20

     

    PERU

    John D. Owen (1962-64), 5/10/20

     

    SAMOA

    Paul Wayne Kidwell (1980s), 4/23/20

     

    SIERRA LEONE

    Frans Koning (1962-63), 4/27/20

     

    SOLOMON ISLANDS

    Vera Viola Moore Miller (1991-93), 5/7/20

     

    SOUTH KOREA

    John Z. Leon, 4/22/20

     

    THE GAMBIA

    Gertrude Crites (1986-88), 4/20/20

     

    TUNISIA

    Walter Sherrill Crowe (1974-78), 4/18/20

     

    TURKEY

    Richard Evan Cone (1964-66), 4/3/20

     

    ZAIRE

    Peter H. Wright (1976-78), 5/5/20

     

    COUNTRY OF SERVICE NOT SPECIFIED

    Roger Condon Allen, 4/4/20

    Lynne Culbertson, 5/15/20

     

     

     

     

    If you have information you would like to share for our monthly In Memoriam post, contact obituary@peacecorpsconnect.org.

  • Jade Colter posted an article
    Remembering those who recently passed away. see more

    The tragedy of the COVID-19 pandemic has reached the Peace Corps community with the virus reported to have contributed to several deaths, including Art Whistler (Samoa), David Gelman (former staff), and Gary Baptist (Ghana). Tragedy struck in other ways recently. We remember those who fought for social justice, human rights, and the needs of others close to home and around the world.

     

    Maeve Kennedy McKean (1979-2020), the granddaughter of Robert F. Kennedy, lost her life in a boating accident near a family home in Maryland. Maeve was an avid advocate for social justice and human rights, with a focus on issues relating to women, girls, and communities affected by HIV/AIDS. Her passion to make a difference in the lives of others greatly shaped the remarkable career she established for herself. She served in the Peace Corps in Mozambique, worked with U.S. Senator Dianne Feinstein, and taught bioethics and human rights at Georgetown University. In addition, Maeve worked with the Obama Administration as the first Senior Advisor for Human Rights within the U.S. Department of State’s Global AIDS program, at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of Global Affairs, and served as Executive Director of Georgetown University’s Global Health Initiative.

     

    Robert Alan Smith (1945-2020) was among the first wave of Peace Corps Volunteers to be assigned to the Ivory Coast (now Cote D'Ivoire). During his service, he taught health education, sanitation, and water resource management in rural villages. After Peace Corps, he created a summer camp in the British West Indies called Society of Friends. Taking up a career in consulting for healthcare administration, he later founded Susquehanna American and National Healthcare Inc., which provides services to personal care facilities and nursing homes.

     

    Lois Ilene Hurley (1930-2020) served her community in Iowa by being an active mentor for youth groups (through church and Girl Scouts) and managing a vet clinic. After retiring, she and her husband volunteered with the Peace Corps and served in Morocco in 1991. They spent time in Kenya assisting the local people with replenishing livestock lost in a drought, and in Mongolia they ran a clinic to provide young veterinary students with hands-on learning.

     

    Carroll J. Bouchard (1939-2020) was a leader of Peace Corps programs in Africa for a decade. A graduate of the University of Maine, Carroll’s first job out of college was as a high school teacher. Carroll joined the executive staff at Jaycees International (JCI), and eventually became Secretary General of JCI. Under his leadership, the organization grew to 600,000 members in over 100 countries. In 1981, Carroll joined Peace Corps. Over the next ten years, he served as Country Director in Burkina Faso, Country Director of Senegal, and Regional Director of Africa Programs.

     

    Karen Ann Kelleher (1948–2020) was born and raised in Washington state, earned a Mathematics degree from Washington State University, and then joined the Peace Corps, serving for three years in Sierra Leone. Karen’s business career culminated with her appointment as Vice President of Financial Investing with Conning Investments. Karen volunteered in her community in many ways. She was a Regent at the University of Hartford and served on the Board of the Hartford Art School. She held several leadership positions with the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art. She served three terms as a Trustee of the Colt Bequest where she served on the Finance and Investment committees.

     

    Thomas Edward Wells (1954-2020) and his wife Lucy joined the Peace Corps and served together in South Korea, working in public health. Following their service, the couple continued their international travel and spent time teaching at schools in Colombia and Guatemala.

     

    Below is our In Memoriam list for members of the Peace Corps community who recently passed away:

     

    PEACE CORPS STAFF

    Carroll J. Bouchard, 4/16/20

    Richard L. Brunker, 3/30/20

    Linda D'Alonzo Martin, 4/20/20

    Monroe Gunn McKay, 3/28/20

    Bradley H. Patterson Jr., 3/19/20

    Raymond French Randolph, 3/12/20

     

    MULTIPLE COUNTRIES

    Elaine Lamski (Nigeria 1966-67; Chad 1967-68), 1/27/20

     

    AFGHANISTAN

    Carol Ann Koslofsky, 3/17/20

     

    AFRICA

    Patrick J. McDonald, 4/6/20

     

    BELIZE

    Geraldine Joan Perkins,  3/21/20

     

    BRAZIL

    Dave Seaton, 4/18/20

     

    CAMEROON

    Art Sherin (1964-66), 4/1/20

     

    COSTA RICA

    Alma Virginia Shaffer Connally (1960s), 3/27/20

     

    COTE D'IVOIRE

    Robert Alan Smith (1965-67), 4/4/20

     

    DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

    Frank J. Ferrari (1964-66), 4/1/2020

    Janice Zalewski, posted 3/22/20

     

    ECUADOR

    Nicholas Graves (1965-67), 4/3/20

     

    ETHIOPIA

    Caroline Amundson, 3/18/20

    Karen Marie Glover (mid/late 2000s), 11/27/19

    Peter A. Winkel (1960s), 4/18/20

     

    GHANA

    Gary J. Baptist, 4/3/20

     

    HONDURAS

    Carla Hodgdon (1967-69), 4/20/19

     

    JAMAICA

    Richard L. Mears, 3/30/20

     

    KENYA

    Scott Gillam (1966-68), 3/23/20

     

    LIBERIA

    Charles Thomas Kowaleski (1980-82), 3/23/20

    Charles R. Stuart (1963-65), 4/7/20

    George L. Wirkkula (1963-56), 4/14/20

     

    MARSHALL ISLANDS

    David M. Nelson (1985-87), 4/20/20

     

    MOROCCO

    Lois Hurley (1991-93), 3/21/20

     

    NEPAL

    Lillian M. Durfee (1991-93), 3/19/20

     

    NIGER

    James Schneider (1964-66), 3/17/20

     

    NIGERIA

    Frank Tilden Boesel, 4/1/20

    Joan Marie Porter (1963-65), 4/5/20

     

    PAPUA NEW GUINEA

    William Phillips Haessly (1990's), 4/7/20

    Barbara T. Lamb (1992-93), 4/1/20

     

    PHILIPPINES

    Steven Thomas Syfert (mid-1960's), 3/31/20

     

    SAMOA

    Jerry Clark Packard, 4/1/20

    Art Whistler, 4/2/20

     

    SOUTH KOREA

    Thomas Edward Wells, 3/26/20

     

    SIERRA LEONE

    Karen Ann Kelleher (1970s), 3/18/20

     

    THAILAND

    Fred Dorn (1965-67), 12/25/19

    Obert Henry Fittje 3/22/20

    Peter Koret (1984-86), 4/9/20

    Sheila B. Mengoni (1962-64), 3/5/20

     

    TURKEY

    Wing Barfoot, 2/6/20

     

    UKRAINE

    Margie Cranford Shuler, 3/28/20

     

    VENEZUELA

    Rod Buchignani (1960s), 3/18/20

     

    COUNTRY OF SERVICE NOT SPECIFIED

    David Clare Addison, 3/30/20

    Russell James Elliott, 4/12/20

    Lucian D. LiPera, 4/4/20

     

     


    If you have information you would like to share for our monthly In Memoriam post, contact obituary@peacecorpsconnect.org.

  • Jonathan Pearson posted an article
    We honor those who served in Peace Corps and recently passed away. see more

    We honor and remember our community members who recently passed away for their unending commitment to peace, justice, and the greater good.

     

    Joseph C. Kennedy (1926-2019) became a part of Peace Corps leadership during the agency’s first decade. He served as Sierra Leone country director from 1967-70, as deputy director for Africa, as regional director for East Africa, and the Pacific. In 1971, Joseph joined another Peace Corps pioneer, C. Payne Lucas, who co-founded Africare. Joseph served as vice president and director of development. When he retired in 1999, $400 million had been distributed to 27 nations to combat drought and famine, support agricultural development and environmental protection, and provide AIDS relief.

     

    Judge David Douglas Kerman's (1944 – 2019) passion and commitment to the law spanned a half-century, since he graduated from the Syracuse University School of Law in 1972. That same year, Judge Kerman married Jura Strimaitis. They met during their Peace Corps service in Turkey in the mid-1960's. They moved to Massachusetts when Kerman took a position as Director of Neighborhood Legal Services in Lynn. Combined with similar work in Syracuse, he worked in legal services for twenty years. In 1990, Governor Michael Dukakis appointed Judge Kerman to the newly-created Northeast Housing Court in Lawrence. He was on the faculty of the National Institute for Trial Advocacy. He also coached students at Lynn Classical High School in the Massachusetts Bar Association’s annual mock trial competition. As a testament to his good work, though required by Massachusetts law to retire at age 70, Judge Kerman was recalled by the state Supreme Judicial Court, and continued his work as a Housing Court Judge for an additional five years.

     

    Lawrence Fabacher (1947-2020) became a Peace Corps Volunteer soon after graduating from the University of Southwestern Louisiana. After Peace Corps, he attended law school at Tulane University. He would remain in New Orleans for the next 40 years, practicing law and specializing in immigration and nationality law. Lawrence became an adjunct faculty member at Tulane, a position he would hold for 25 years. He is credited for implementing immigration curriculum at the law school. In 1996, he was the recipient of the Monte Lehman Distinguished Teaching Award. Lawrence also taught immigration law in Mexico during the summers as a faculty member for Loyola Law School. Lawrence was a member of the American Immigration Lawyers Association. He was also a member of the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association.

     

    Bonnie Knight Graves's (1932-2020) two years of Peace Corps service in Romania were not enough. She also volunteered with Americorps, Global Volunteers, and Cross-Cultural Solutions. Bonnie was a graduate of Carthage College and later obtained a masters degree from New York University. Her first venture overseas was with her husband Ted, a U.S. Naval Academy graduate who was stationed at military bases in the U.S. and Japan for twenty years. No matter where she was located, Bonnie would play the piano and organ at church services, an activity she began at age sixteen.

     

    Lyndell (Hopkins) Edgemon (1943-2020) was very active in her community, running several businesses, organizing a city tennis tournament, and playing an active role in the lives of her three sons. After their children had grown, Lyndell and her husband Charlie moved from their west Texas farm to the Kingdom of Tonga, where they served as Peace Corps Volunteers. They then spent four years in Volkov, Russia, creating an agricultural coop with twenty Russian farmers. Upon returning to the U.S., Lyndell was hired by the Census Bureau. She would close out her career at the Bureau twenty years later. In 2015, she received the National Census Award of Excellence.

     

    Bastiaan Schouten (1942-2020) dedicated career to public service occurred because of a decision made when he was seven years old. Bastiaan’s family made the decision to emigrate from The Netherlands to the United States, settling in Portland, Oregon in 1950. Bastiaan became a U.S. citizen at age 18, and later earned both undergraduate and graduate degrees from Lewis and Clark University. He also earned additional master’s degrees from the University of California in 1967 and from the National Defense University in 1989. Bastiaan married his wife Priscilla in 1967, and together they joined the Peace Corps, serving for two years in Honduras. That first step towards public service culminated with a 31-year career with the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID). Along with Honduras, Bastiaan was stationed with USAID in Bolivia, Costa Rica, El Salvador, and Jordan. He returned to Washington to head the agency’s Office for Development Planning in the Latin America and Caribbean Bureau. Among his many achievements, Bastiaan was deeply involved in efforts leading to significant poverty reduction in Costa Rica and the transformation of the country into a model of export-led growth and eco-tourism.

      

    Below is our In Memoriam list for members of the Peace Corps community who recently passed away:

     

    PEACE CORPS STAFF

    Gene H. Brown, 1/22/20

    Arlene Favaregh (PCMO 16 years in various African countries), 1/17/20

    Joseph C. Kennedy (Sierra Leone Country Director 1967-70; DC HQ Staff), 12/7/19

    Richard J. Krausz, 1/31/20

    Allen Scott Lowe, 1/20/20

    Thomas Reynolds (Costa Rica; USA), 1/7/20

    Herbert L. Tyson, 12/4/19

     

    MULTIPLE COUNTRIES

    Elaine Lamski (Nigeria 1966-67; Chad 1967-68), 1/27/20

    Paul J. McPeck (Vanuatu 1994-97; Morocco 2001-02), 12/29/19

    Jeffrey Scott Watson (Korea/Philippines late 70's, early 80's), 12/30/19

    David Ziegenhagen (Thailand/Philippines/Samoa Country Director/U.S. Staff), 1/29/20

     

    BOLIVIA

    Constance B. Weeks (1966-68), 1/21/20

     

    BRAZIL

    Robert Charles Booth (1967-69), 2/3/20

     

    COLOMBIA

    Lawrence B. Fabacher, 1/21/20

    David J. Hayden, 1/25/20

     

    ECUADOR

    John M. "Mike" Daley (1963-65), 1/27/20

    Edward Whalen (1963-65), 1/9/20

     

    ETHIOPIA

    Julie Jordan Drennan (Staff Nurse 1963-66), 1/17/20

     

    FIJI

    Robert J. "Rob" Cary Jr. (1979-81), 1/27/20

    Robert G. "Scotty" Scotton (1980-82), 1/19/19

     

    GABON

    Donald Herbert Reighard (1963-65), 2/2/20

     

    GHANA

    Norman Oswald, 1/15/20

     

    GRENADA

    Marian Elaine (Cook) Fittje (1975), 2/1/20

     

    HONDURAS

    Bastiaan Schouten (1967-69), 1/24/20

     

    INDIA

    Wallace Coe (1968-69), 1/24/20

     

    KENYA

    George U. "Bud" Paulding III (1964-66), 2/5/20

     

    LESOTHO

    John Christy McCoy, 1/2/20

     

    LIBERIA

    Irvin Bieser Jr. (1966-69), 2/6/20

     

    MALAWI

    John E. Sasman, 10/24/19

     

    MICRONESIA

    Kelly B. Raynolds (1967-69), 1/24/20

     

    NIGER

    Geoffrey Robert Geurts (1992-95), 1/12/20

     

    NIGERIA

    Noval. B. Abraham (1962-64), 2/14/20

    M. Sherrin Langeler (1966), 2/8/20

     

    PANAMA

    Marvin Gerstein (1966-68), 2/17/20

     

    PAPUA NEW GUINEA

    Jim Foley, posted 2/19/20

     

    PARAGUAY

    Gwendolyn Pierce, 1/30/20

     

    PERU

    Richard Lee "Dick" Rossignol (1965-68), 1/31/20

     

    PHILIPPINES

    Ronald Allan Laux (1963-65), 1/27/20

     

    ROMANIA

    Bonnie Knight Graves (1992-93), 2/8/20

     

    SIERRA LEONE

    Fred Ligon (1968-70)

     

    TANZANIA

    Earl Mason Brown Jr. (1964-66), 10/9/19

     

    TONGA

    Lyndell (Hopkins) Edgemon, 2/8/20

     

    TURKEY

    John George Bordie, 1/23/20

    Judge David Douglas Kerman (1965-67), 11/17/19

    Kenneth Andrew Marion (1965-67), 3/3/19

     

    COUNTRY OF SERVICE NOT SPECIFIED

    Claude MacMillan, 1/19/20

    Eugenia Schuller (served in Central America), 1/24/20

    Phillip M. Wasylean II (served in South America), 1963-65

    Edward J. Woods, 1/22/20

    Kay Woods, 1/27/20

    Edward Francis Yacovone, 1/19/20

     

     

     

     

    If you have information you would like to share for our monthly In Memoriam post, contact obituary@peacecorpsconnect.org.

    Thanks to Betty Pyle for her assistance in preparing this month's In Memoriam page. 

  • Jonathan Pearson posted an article
    We honor and remember those who served our nation with the Peace Corps see more

    We honor the lives of individuals whose service to their communities far outlived their Peace Corps service. We celebrate the work and legacies of these remarkable individuals who inspired their communities at home and abroad.

     

    Shanna (Urness) Baggaley (1937-2020) was part of the first group of Peace Corps Volunteers to serve in Thailand in 1961. She taught ESL through adult learning both in service and following her return to northern California. She continued her service to her community by working as the assistant director of a county department, Community Partnership Agency, that facilitated training and educational programs. She was a panelist within the Neighborhood Court in addition to working and volunteering with the Court Appointed Special Advocate program for foster kids. Shanna’s accomplishments directly within her community include her active participation in the Woodland United Methodist Church; organizing the first Woodland Christmas basket program and several subsequent programs and was the first woman president of the Woodland Kiwanis club; served on the United Way Board for six years; participated in the Make-a-Wish program; delivered Meals on Wheels for many years; and tutored several students through the Literacy Council at the jail and at the library up until just a few weeks before her passing. She also spent time abroad volunteering and participating in missions in Peru, Ecuador, Mexico, Cuba, and India.

     

    Virginia T. Battle (1922-2020) was a trailblazer in her professional career and maintained a love for politics until her passing earlier this year. She served as Executive Secretary for a then Massachusetts Congressman, John F. Kennedy. She would eventually follow JFK to the White House. She continued her legacy by making great impacts through her work in the federal government, under cabinet officials, in the state department, and in the Peace Corps as the Executive Secretary for Sargent Shriver.

     

    Susan Severtson (1943-2020) taught English and Domestic Science as a Sierra Leone Peace Corps Volunteer in the mid-1960s. She also assisted the Minister of Culture in the compilation of a National Dance Troupe, working as a costume consultant. A trained librarian (University of Chicago), Susan worked in the field for thirty years. She spent eight years as President of Chadwyck-Healey academic publishers, and has compiled over 30 major academic collections and databases. Her experience in administration, sales, marketing, and editorial activities in the electronic publishing business provided her with an insight to the technical challenges of curatorial work in the arts and design field as well as a good grasp of the world of design information dissemination. She spent two years working with Documents Compass, a non-profit organization, established with the purpose of providing guidance to documentary editors entering the digital age. In partnership with her husband, she has established the Design Information Alliance, a non-profit organization dedicated to creating a database/portal which will identify, archive and make freely available resources for the study and practice of design in multiple disciplines. Recently applying her skills to the Peace Corps community, Susan served on the leadership team of the Museum of the Peace Corps Experience.

     

    Gary David Crawford (1942-2020) taught high school English for several years after college before serving in the Peace Corps on the island of Yap in Western Micronesia, where he taught elementary English from 1965-68. Following his Peace Corps service, he became a language coordinator for the Yap government and spent many years training individuals in island countries within the Western Pacific until 1977. His career at the Foreign Service Institute of Washington, DC began in 1979, where he spent time identifying and implementing techniques to assist diplomatic personnel in learning languages. In 1997, Gary retired from his position as Associate Dean of the institute. Developing a passion for waterman culture, he and his wife Susan opened Crawford Nautical Books, a bookstore focusing on all things related to water. He regularly contributed to the Tidewater Times, published a local newsletter known as the Island Flyer, and became a frequent volunteer with Phillips Wharf Environment Center.

     

    Jerry Gabay (1944-2020) attended Stanford University before serving in the Vietnam War as an officer of the United States Coast Guard. Following his military service, Jerry attended the University of Oregon, where he earned his law degree and served as a public defender before joining the Peace Corps in 1984. He completed service in Malawi, Africa where he taught French, History, and coached basketball. Upon returning to the United States, Jerry obtained his teaching certificate and further continued his passions for teaching. He remained a dedicated social justice advocate, spending six months in Antigua, Guatemala volunteering with a social and health clinic in 2002-2003. Though he retired from his teaching career in 2008, his love for travel inspired him to teach English in Slovakia, Ecuador, and Spain. Following the loss of his daughter to mental illness, he became a major promoter of suicide prevention and mental illness awareness for youth and families.

     

    Ervin Henry Hoffart (1924-2020) passed away at the age of 95 years old after enjoying an enriching life of service. Prior to attaining both his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in physics from the University of Nebraska, Ervin served in the Navy during WWII. In his extensive career working in teaching and development, he worked on the PSSC Physics program at MIT and made great contributions to the subsequent textbook that was used in high schools during and beyond the 1960s. His passion for teaching and science education led him to serve in the Peace Corps in Dominica and AID in Ethiopia in the 1990s.

     

    Gerry Bernard Thiemann (1958-2020) fulfilled his Peace Corps service in Costa Rica from 1983-1985 where he put his economic knowledge to use by creating the first avocado tree nurseries in the area which have developed into thousands of trees that have produced sales all over Central America. In addition to this wonderful agricultural contribution, he also took the time to raise funds to build a women-owned and operated bakery. In 1989, he and his wife Carmen were the founders of the Conversa Language School which has provided translation services to medical clinics and businesses in diverse markets, as well as teaching young scholars valuable language skills to help them attain good jobs. An active golfer, Gerry continued to contribute to his community by frequently hosting charity golf tournaments. 

     

    Below is our In Memoriam list for members of the Peace Corps community who recently passed away:

     

    PEACE CORPS STAFF

    Virginia T. Battle, 1/18/20

    Barbara Boyd, 2/9/20

     

    MULTIPLE COUNTRIES

    Paul Allen Liebman (Sri Lanka; Liberia 1969-70), 3/14/20

    Kathleen Ann Lumbra (Panama; Dominican Republic), 2/25/20

    Yolanda Gail Mitts (Libya 1969; Thailand 1970-72), 2/16/20

     

    BOLIVIA

    Lance Russell Haddon (1967-69), 2/16/20

     

    BRAZIL

    Richard M. "Dick" Geary, 2/17/20

    Beverly Johnson (1967-69), 2/24/20

    Edna O'Connor, 3/12/20

     

    COLOMBIA

    Roland Intrator, 2/29/20

     

    COSTA RICA

    Jeffrey Clyde Evans, 3/3/20

    Gerry Bernard Thiemann (1983-85), 2/19/20

     

    DOMINICA

    Ervin Henry Hoffart (1993-95), 3/17/20

     

    DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

    Gerald Schmiedicke, 3/13/20

     

    ECUADOR

    Gerald Giedd (1966-69), 2/28/20 

     

    ETHIOPIA

    Ernest Russell Franz (1971-74), 3/21/20

    Sean Philip Wilson, 2/28/2020

     

    GUATEMALA

    Thomas N. Dzaugis (1980-82), 3/3/20

     

    HONDURAS

    Nicholas Willis Howes, (1966-69), 2/23/20

     

    INDIA

    Langdon Phillips Williams Jr. (1963-66), 2/13/20 

     

    IRAN

    Andre Houston, 3/5/20

     

    JAMAICA

    Montreal Collins Farve (1993-95), 2020

    Monica Schliep, 2/15/20

     

    KENYA 

    Carole Jo "Toni" Friesen (1974), 3/7/20

    Carol J. Page (1972-75), 3/14/20

     

    KOREA

    Lee J. Vaughan (1964-67), 2/29/20

     

    LESOTHO

    Hazel E. Wagner, 3/18/20

     

    LIBERIA

    Joan P. Donoghue (1963-66), 2/14/20

     

    MICRONESIA

    Gary David Crawford (1965-68), 3/5/20

    Lee Huddleston, 2/24/20

     

    MOROCCO

    Jeffrey A. Dodge, 3/12/20

     

    MALAWI

    Jerry Gabay (1984-86), 3/14/20

     

    NIGERIA

    Diane M. Leach (1966-68), 3/2/20

     

    PAPUA NEW GUINEA

    Lee A. Robertson, 2/22/20

     

    PERU

    Lynn A. Mead, 3/4/20

     

    SAINT VINCENT & THE GRENADINES

    Elizabeth A. Stephens, 2/29/20

     

    SIERRA LEONE

    Nathan Edward Lindgren, 2/25/20

    Susan M.Q. Severtson (1964-66), 3/13/20

     

    THAILAND

    Shanna Urness Baggaley (1961-63), 2020 

     

    TOGO

    Natasha Ott (2007-09), 3/24/20

     

    TONGA

    Rodney McGrath, 3/12/20

     

    TUNISIA 

    Rosemary Ellen Stock (1963-65), 3/1/20

    Martin Tenney (1968-70), Fall 2019

     

    TURKEY

    Judith Ellen Rusnock Jenkins (1964-66), Feb/20

     

    UKRAINE

    William P. Zasoba (2003-04), 2/10/2020

     

    COUNTRY OF SERVICE NOT SPECIFIED

    Paula Antoinette Bambic, 6/11/19

    Jeanne Gerritsen, 3/8/20

    Edmond James Roth (Africa 1980), 3/7/20

    Michael Earl Rutherford, 3/14/20

    William Scott Tyson (Africa 1970's), 3/1/20

    Suzanne Cathryn Willsey, 2/29/20

     

     

     

    If you have information you would like to share for our monthly In Memoriam post, contact obituary@peacecorpsconnect.org.

    Thanks to Jade Colter for assistance in preparing this month's In Memoriam page. 

  • Jonathan Pearson posted an article
    We remember those within the Peace Corps community who recently passed away. see more

     Whether through the State Department, Radio Free Asia, FEMA, or the Department of Agriculture, Peace Corps was a springboard for continued service to our nation among a number of distinguished individuals we lost in recent weeks.

     

    Peace Corps Volunteer. Diplomat. Friend and supporter of the National Peace Corps Association. Service on the NPCA Board of Directors was just one of the boards Darryl Norman Johnson (1938 -2018) served on, following a long and distinguished career in the foreign service. Darryl's formal education took him across the country, from the University of Puget Sound, University of Washington, to the University of Minnesota, to Princeton. Darryl joined the Peace Corps in 1963, serving in Thailand. Soon after he completed service, Darryl joined the State Department and was assigned to his first post in India. That was just the beginning, as further assignments and increasing responsibilities took Darryl to Taiwan, Province of China; Hong Kong, Special Administrative Region of China; Moscow; China; and Poland. After the breakup of the Soviet Union, Darryl was selected to be the first Ambassador to Lithuania. He would eventually rise to the rank of Under Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs, and - coming full circle to his Peace Corps service - becoming our nation's Ambassador to Thailand. Darryl would later share his experiences with the next generation of diplomats, teaching at the Scoop Jackson School of International Relations at the University of Washington. 

     

    He said he knew he wanted to be in the foreign service by the time he was in 4th grade. The career of Thomas Gallagher (1940-2018) was extensive and notable. And it began with the Peace Corps, which Tom applied to five days after graduating from Monmouth University in 1962. Tom served as a volunteer in Ethiopia. He would later become among the earliest supporters of Eritrean independence and remained devoted to the country the remainder of his life. Following service and a brief stint in the White House (working on the Johnson administration's War on Poverty), Tom joined the State Department in 1965, taking on assignments in Saudi Arabia and Ecuador. His work with the Office of Personnel - including breakthrough hires of women - would later result in Tom winning the Tragen Award, honoring support for the women's movement at State in its early days. In 1975, Tom became the first government officer to publicly and voluntarily "come out" as a gay man. This decision forced Tom to resign from the State Department. He would travel to California and pursue a career as a social worker. He returned to the State Department in 1994, when the policy of formal discrimination against gay foreign service officers was lifted. In 2015 Monmouth University named Tom its Distinguished Alumnus of the Year. In 2016, New Jersey Pride honored Tom with its Trailblazer award.

     

    A Peace Corps official in the 1960's, he would later become the founding president of Radio Free Asia. Dick Richter (1929 - 2018) graduated from New York Queens College in 1950, and began a career in journalism. Dick was a copy aide at the New York Times and then became a reporter at Newsday and the New York World-Telegram Sun. In the 1960's he joined Peace Corps staff, first as an overseas program evaluator and later as the deputy director of programs in Kenya. Dick returned to journalism, this time moving to television. He was a news producer at WETA public television in Washington. He also worked as a news producer for ABC television, including serving as founding producer of "Good Morning America". In 1996, Dick was appointed as founding president of Radio Free Asia (RFA). Upon his retirement in 2005, he said "Repressive governments reviled RFA because we were letting people know what was going on in their own countries - providing information that their own leaders would suppress."

     

    Debra (Hunt) Nace (1970 - 2018) along with her husband William died earlier this year from injuries sustained in an auto accident. After graduating with degrees in Agronomy and French from Iowa State University, Debra Nace joined the Peace Corps, serving in Senegal. Her public service would continue. Debra was hired by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, where she would work for the Natural Resources Conservation Service in Iowa, Pennsylvania, Idaho and Ohio. She also worked on Puerto Rico hurricane recovery efforts with FEMA. Debra was a co-leader of a Girl Scout troop, and a member of the Delaware (OH) Women's City Club. 

     

    Clair Elmer Skold's (1933 - 2018) service as Peace Corps overseas staff was ten years in length, first as Associate Director in Malaysia and later as Country Director in the Kingdom of Tonga. Between the age of four and nine, Elmer accompanied his family to west-central Alaska, where his parents traveled to teach English to Eskimos. The family then moved to Washington state, where Elmer would eventually graduate from the University of Washington. Following his overseas Peace Corps assignments, Elmer and his family moved back to the Seattle area. He was a member of the Bothell United Methodist Church choir for forty years, and also participated in a men's gospel group that performed at area churches, nursing homes and public gatherings. He was appointed as an original member of the city of Kenmore's Downtown Task Force. Elmer also served many years on the Kenmore Heritage Society.

     

    Below is our In Memoriam list for members of the Peace Corps community who recently passed away:

     

    STAFF

    Dick Richter, 6/29/18

    Clair Elmer Skold, 6/6/18

    MULTIPLE COUNTRIES

    Robert J. Attaway (Nigeria/Ethiopia), Posted 7/15/18

    Lilly Otto (Ecuador 1980-82; Guatemala 1982-84), 7/7/18

    ANTIGUA

    John Logan "Jack" Bullister (1973-75), 6/13/18

    BRAZIL

    William Paul "Bill" Sloane, 7/7/18

    CHAD

    Christopher W. Duarte (1991-93), 6/26/18

    COSTA RICA

    Eric Charles Lehman (1976-78), 7/10/18

    ETHIOPIA

    Thomas Gallagher (1962-64), 7/8/18

    FIJI

    Lee Brelie (1969-71), 6/16/18

    GHANA

    John Thomas Hutton (1969-71), 6/26/18

    HONDURAS

    Janice Rule (1980-82), 7/14/18

    INDIA

    Aaron Vail Frost III (1965-66), 7/7/18

    Dan Gusewelle, 7/8/18

    IRAN

    George Townsend Dorrill (1967-69), 7/13/18

    KENYA

    Terry B. Carpenter (1963-67), 6/12/18

    LESOTHO

    Beth Healy, 6/19/18

    Jenny Phillips (1967-69), 7/9/18

    NIGERIA

    Whitney P. Foster (1964-66), 3/24/18

    Norm Gary (1961-63), 6/24/18

    PHILIPPINES

    Charles P. Brown Jr., 7/5/18

    Richard J. (Dick) Zecher (1962-64), 7/5/18

    POLAND

    Aimee Thompson, 7/10/18

    SENEGAL

    Debra Anne (Hunt) Nace, 2/3/18

    THAILAND

    Joan Boyce (1963 - 65), 6/14/18

    Darryl Johnson (1963-65), 6/24/18

    TOGO

    Irene R. Schreck, 6/24/18

    TURKEY

    Edward Klinger (1966-68), 7/10/18

    COUNTRY OF SERVICE NOT SPECIFIED

    Robert Craig Smith, 7/4/18

    Patricia Stoddard, 7/5/18

     

     

     

    • Judy Marcouiller Patricia (Pat) Stoddard was one of our Teacher Trainer volunteers in Sierra Leone - she was assigned to the Milton Margai Teacher Training Institute from 1990-92 (I think). Sorry to hear of her... see more Patricia (Pat) Stoddard was one of our Teacher Trainer volunteers in Sierra Leone - she was assigned to the Milton Margai Teacher Training Institute from 1990-92 (I think). Sorry to hear of her passing. -Judy Marcouiller
      1 year ago
  • Jonathan Pearson posted an article
    Remembering the achievements of those who served in the Peace Corps see more

    In the early Peace Corps days, some Volunteer assignments included developing and expanding sports programs. Among the many achievements of community members who recently passed away, sports played a central role in their professional careers. 
      

    Michael R. Hebert (1944-2019) played volleyball at the University of California, Santa Barbara, but upon graduation his connection with the sport was just beginning. First, however, he decided to join the Peace Corps, serving in Nigeria from 1966-1967. Following his service, Mike earned a Ph.D. in Educational Philosophy at Indiana University. Then it was back to volleyball. He coached both men’s and women’s volleyball at the University of Pittsburgh and then moved to New Mexico for three years where he coached women’s volleyball. In 1981, he became the women’s volleyball coach at Illinois in the Big Ten. Mike’s teams won four Big Ten titles and made two NCAA Final Four appearances for the first time in team history. At the end of his 13 years, his teams had won 323 games. He then moved to Minnesota in 1996 and over the next 15 years his teams amassed a record of 381-137 with 14 appearances in the NCAA tournament and three in the Final Four. Mike was Big Ten coach of the year five times and was inducted into the American Volleyball Coaches Hall of Fame in 2006. Mike was also a fixture of USA Volleyball, including serving as head or assistant coach between 1987 and 2016. Mike was named USA Volleyball’s Donald S. Shondell All-Time Great Coach in 2011.

     

    George Nicolau (1925-2020) worked with Sargent Shriver in Washington, D.C. and conducted field research selecting volunteer work/living sites. Later in his career, he became a distinguished professional sports labor arbitrator, who ruled against baseball owners in two collusion cases, and served as president of the National Academy of Arbitrators. George also served as independent arbitrator for the National Basketball Players Association and the NHL Players Association. As a young man, George went into the Army Air Corps, flew four missions over Germany during World War II, and lost a leg during his service. After a year's convalescence, he attended the University of Michigan. George went on to Columbia Law School and became a labor lawyer. After his service at Peace Corps headquarters, he worked for the U.S. Office of Economic Opportunity, New York City's Community Development Agency, the Fund for the City of New York, and the Institute for Mediation and Conflict Resolution. Besides sports, Nicolau ruled in disputes involving ABC, NBC, and the National Association of Broadcast Employees and Technicians.

     

    Nancy Butler (1967-2019) joined the Peace Corps after graduating from the University of Colorado and was assigned a post in Suceava, Romania. After meeting her partner Lee in 2000 while both were working in Antarctica, the couple returned to their native Colorado, settling in South Fork. Nancy was hired in 2002 as Executive Director of the Rio Grande Headwaters Land Trust (RiGHT). Although she was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2003, Nancy refused to slow down. She soon became a respected leader in the field of land conservation. Among her achievements, RiGHT’s Rio Grande Initiative was credited with protecting over 27,000 acres of the Rio Grande and Conejos River corridors. The Palmer Land Trust awarded Nancy with its Friends of Open Space award in 2014. While under Nancy’s leadership, RiGHT was honored with the Phil James Conservation Award from the Colorado Nature Conservancy in 2011 and an award for outstanding work by a non-profit organization by the El Pomar Foundation in 2013.

     

    Andrew J. Bell III (1929-2019) was responsible for early Peace Corps operations in Eritrea, Ethiopia and then Nigeria, supervising and supporting volunteers, developing jobs and relationships with the countries ministries and departments, and securing the safety of volunteers and staff during coups and political unrest. Jay became the director for all Peace Corps operations in sub-Saharan Africa in the 1970's, responsible for more than 2,000 volunteers and 260 staff spread throughout 22 African countries. In the United States, he worked to improve living conditions through the Model Cities program, which was part of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. He set an example of lifelong learning, earning three masters degrees and a doctorate in international education followed by an online course with England's Oxford University for advanced study when he was 75.

     

    Kathryn Campbell Merriam (1932-2019) received a B.A. in Education from UCLA, a Master's in Education from Idaho State University, and a PhD in Curriculum and Instruction from UCONN. She taught school and founded an education business “Synthesis.” A community activist, Kay served as Chair of Bannock County Planning and Zoning Commission, state and local president of League of Women Voters, taught for New Knowledge Adventures, hosted a television program “Conversations,” and was an Idaho State Journal correspondent. Her most recent recognition was the NAACP Medgars Evers Award for Distinguished Service in 2019. Kay joined the Peace Corps at age 68 to serve in South Africa.

     

    James Thomas O’Meara (1943-2019) said he was inspired to join the Peace Corps by a line in John F. Kennedy's inaugural speech: "If a free society fails to help the many who are poor, it cannot save the few who are rich." After graduating from DePaul University, he became a PCV in the Philippines, where from 1965 to 1967 he used construction skills to plan and supervise the building of a rural schoolhouse, library, and clinic. He then went to Vietnam with the U.S. Agency for International Development. As part of a military-civilian team in the Binh Duong Province, he was often in harm's way, especially during the Tet Offensive of January 1968. The State Department gave him its Award for Heroism that year "for courageous action while under fire in Vietnam.” Jim's jobs at USAID took him to Asia, Africa, and Latin America. In 1983, USAID gave him its Distinguished Honor Award "for sustained distinguished service.” As Acting Director of the Food for Peace Office from 1990 to 1992, he devised a plan to get shipments of food to Ethiopia and Djibouti, which were being stalled at the port of Assab. Jim continued his food aid career at the U.S. Agriculture Department, where he traveled frequently to help the former states of the Soviet Union fight hunger and develop greater food security.

     

    Below is our In Memoriam list for members of the Peace Corps community who recently passed away:

     

    PEACE CORPS STAFF

    Andrew J. Bell III (Eritrea, Ethiopia, Nigeria), 12/20/19

    Rev. Dr. Robert E. McAuley, 1/10/20

    Henry Edward McKoy, 1/4/20

    George Nicolau (1963-65)

     

    MULTIPLE COUNTRIES

    Robert M. "Mike" Culp (Ethiopia 1968-69; Malawi - staff 1985-89), 1/19/20

    Brian Steinwand (Dem Republic of Congo 1982-87; Cameroon 1987-90), 12/22/19

     

    BOLIVIA

    John Coggins (1965-67), 12/20/19

     

    BRAZIL

    Mario LaMorte (1965-67), 12/16/19

     

    CAMEROON

    Daniel P. Reardon (1969-71), 1/4/20

    Richard W. "Dick" Weber (1962-64), 12/14/19

     

    CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC

    Sonia M. Walter (1993-95), 1/5/20

     

    CHILE

    Dan L. Smith (late 1960's), 12/19/19

     

    COLOMBIA

    Margaret Corcoran "Peg" Clark, 12/31/19

     

    COSTA RICA

    John Edwin Green, 1/9/20

    Jack J. Rosenblum (1962-64), 1/13/20

     

    ECUADOR

    Leslie Houston (1992-96), 1/14/20

    John Rothchild (1968-70), 12/26/19

     

    ETHIOPIA

    Joseph Michael Ciuffini (1964-66), 1/10/20

     

    GHANA

    Betty Catherine Baker (1967-69), 12/26/19

     

    HONDURAS

    Frederic Hjalmar Floodstrand (1972-74), 11/18/18

    Dean Striebich (1982-84), posted 1/22/20

     

    INDIA

    Richard Karl Evans (1966-68), 12/17/19

    Fredde L. Schertz, 1/6/20

     

    JAMAICA

    Doreen Hall, 12/23/19

     

    KENYA

    Kay Riley, 12/23/19

     

    MALAYSIA

    Judy Feimer (1971-73), 1/1/20

    Dennis Hattem (1975-78), 1/14/20

    Guy Ulysses Priest (1962-64), 1/3/20

     

    MALI

    Robert Heil Jr., 1/11/20

     

    MOROCCO

    Leslie C. McDonald (1963-65), 12/26/19

    Joseph Anthony Moriarty (1990-93), 12/2/19

    Daniel Reardon (1969-71), 1/4/20

     

    NIGERIA

    Michael R. Hebert (1966-77), 10/21/19

    Robert H. Scheppler (1961-63), 11/1/19

     

    PHILIPPINES

    Margo Heineman Daniels (1960-63), 1/2/20

    Charlie Gonzalez IV, 1/17/20

    Carl Hoffman, 12/26/19

    James Thomas O'Meara (1965-67), 12/18/19

     

    ROMANIA

    Nancy Butler, 11/29/19

     

    SIERRA LEONE

    Michael Leonard Cunha (1966-68), 1/12/20

     

    SOUTH AFRICA

    Kathryn Campbell Merriam, 12/4/19

     

    eSWATINI (Formerly Swaziland)

    James Randy McGinnis (1981-84), 12/14/19

     

    THAILAND

    Diane Weis, 12/14/19

     

    TOGO

    Janet L. (Johnston) Chorbajian, 12/29/19

     

    COUNTRY OF SERVICE NOT SPECIFIED

    Lawrence M. "Larry" Busch (West Africa 1967-70), 12/28/19

    Michael Collopy, 10/26/19

    Rev. Susan M. Scofield (1967-69), 12/27/19

    Marylee B. Ward, 12/27/19

     

     

     

     

    If you have information you would like to share for our monthly In Memoriam post, contact obituary@peacecorpsconnect.org.

    Thanks to Betty Pyle for her assistance in preparing this month's In Memoriam page.

  • Jonathan Pearson posted an article
    Remembering those within the Peace Corps community who recently passed away. see more

    As the year comes to a close and we reflect, we remember the sacrifice, generosity, and benevolence of many within our Peace Corps community who recently passed away.

     

    Dr. Pamela York Klainer (1945-2019) attended The College of St. Elizabeth, followed by a Peace Corps assignment in rural Panama. She received a Doctorate of Education from the University of Rochester. Pam was known as an adventurous spirit, lifelong philanthropist, entrepreneur, author, blogger, and loving friend, mother, and grandmother. From her first visit to Panama in the 1960s, Pam built lifelong friendships with her 'family of the heart,' returning to Panama regularly with friends and family. Pam cared deeply about philanthropy, establishing the Dr. Jeremy A. Klainer Entrepreneurial Scholarship Fund at the University of Rochester School of Nursing to support innovation in nursing, and helped found the Knox Clinic, providing essential medical care to the uninsured of mid-coast Maine. Pam is also the author of two books and published more than 10,000 blog entries.

     

    Helen Armstrong's(1936-2019) personal grief turned her into an advocate for parents with hospitalized children. She was educated at Wellesley College, and earned a Master's degree in teaching from Harvard. With ambition to work overseas, Helen moved to Kenya to work as a high school teacher in the late 1950s. She returned to the U.S. a few years later, met James Armstrong, who shared her interest in Africa. They married, joined the Peace Corps, and moved back to Kenya as teachers. Once back in the U.S., the eldest of their four children died of a congenital heart defect as a toddler. Helen transformed tragedy into impacting policy changes that allowed parents to accompany small children throughout hospitalizations, rather than restricting their presence to rigid visiting hours. This advocacy in healthcare continued when the family returned to Nairobi, Kenya in 1977. Helen consulted and collaborated on a variety of public health and maternal and child nutrition projects. When she relocated to Winchester, Massachusetts in 1990, Helen continued her work with La Leche League, and also became a consultant in UNICEF's Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative, which involved travel to many nations to train doctors, health care workers, and program directors.

     

    Joseph Haratani's (1923-2019) life as a teen had been uprooted to a Japanese internment camp. Joe served the public good his entire life. He joined the U.S. Army's 442nd Regimental Combat Team during World War II, surviving combat in Italy and France. Joe earned degrees at both Stanford University and the University of California, and joined the U.S. Department of State as a civil/sanitary engineer working in Latin America, Southeast Asia, and the Middle East. In 1968, Joe relocated his family from Virginia to become director of the Peace Corps in Ecuador. After two years, he made the unusual move by becoming a volunteer with his wife and family. When the U.S. government made monetary reparations in 1988 to surviving WWII internees, Joe donated his to a trust for Sonora Elementary School with the stipulation that the interest be used for education about civil rights.

     

    Judge Richard Bender Abell (1943-2019) was a member of the Federal judiciary for twenty years. Judge Abell graduated from The George Washington University with a B.A. in 1966 and a J.D. in 1974. He served as a Peace Corps Volunteer from 1967 to 1969 in Colombia. Subsequently he volunteered for the U.S. Army and served in Vietnam in 1970. He was awarded the Purple Heart, the Army Commendation Medal for Heroism, and the Combat Infantryman’s Badge. Richard served as an Assistant District Attorney and Deputy Sheriff in Chester County, Pennsylvania, taught law school at Delaware Law School in Wilmington, Delaware, and was on the staff of Senator Richard Schweiker. During part of the Reagan Administration he served in D.C. in executive positions with the Peace Corps and also with the Department of Justice. In 1991, Richard was appointed to the Federal judiciary in the U.S. Court of Federal Claims. President Reagan asked him to consult with the Federal Prison Industries Corporation, the Interagency Task Force on Adoption, the Presidential Commission on Agricultural Workers, National Crime Prevention Coalition, National Institute of Corrections, National Center for State and Local Law Enforcement Training, National Drug Policy Board Enforcement, Drug Abuse Prevention and Health, and Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

     

    Steven Paul Dolan (1948-2019) was a former “Gong Show” winner, a philosophy major, and Fortune 500 communications consultant. He attended Fordham University and the University of Missouri, receiving a B.A. in philosophy after serving two years with the Peace Corps in South Korea. For 28 years, Steven was a communications consultant for Fortune 500 companies. Prior to committing to corporate training, Steven began his working career in the performing arts, winning the Gong Show and appearing on "The Bob Newhart Show" and "McMillan and Wife" in the seventies, as well as traveling with "Laugh In's" Ruth Buzzy Review. His work included writing music that was performed at the White House and creating and producing an album of 24 songs he wrote about loss and recovery.

     

    Bruce Stark Lowney (1937-2019) was one of New Mexico's most talented and eminent artists. He earned a B.A. from North Texas State and his M.A. from San Francisco State. Bruce served in the military from 1962-1964 before joining Peace Corps in Papua New Guinea from 1992-1994. Bruce was a stone lithographer and a painter best known for his surrealistic New Mexico skies. His work is included in private collections throughout the United States and New Mexico. Many museums, universities, and galleries have archived his paintings and prints. His amazing talent and his wondrous imagination earned him numerous fellowships and awards including an Artist in Residence Fellowship in Roswell, a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship, and the Tiffany Foundation Award.

     

    Below is our In Memoriam list for members of the Peace Corps community who recently passed away:

     

    MULTIPLE COUNTRIES

    John Steven Hartwell (Kenya 1965-67; Colombia Country Director 1969-70), 10/19/19

    Harriet Sue Fox Riehl (Honduras 1967-69; Costa Rica staff 1974-76), 7/19

     

    BARBADOS

    Mary Alice Glenn, 11/11/19

     

    BOLIVIA

    Dale Edward Harris (1965-67), 11/27/19

    James Otis Wright Jr. (1967-69), 11/15/19

     

    CAMEROON

    Ernest Wayne Leonard, 10/29/19

     

    COLOMBIA

    Richard Bender Abell (1967-69), 11/21/19

    C. Charles "Chuck" Benson (1970-71), 12/2/19

    Nancy "Sam" (Temple) Samuels, 11/13/19

     

    ECUADOR

    Joseph Haratani (Country Director 1968-70; Volunteer 1970-72)

     

    ESWATINI (FORMERLY SWAZILAND)

    David Brooks "Dave" McLane (1968-69), 12/5/19

     

    ETHIOPIA

    Bessie Dalton (1972-74), posted 12/5/19

    Sara Hobart Homeyer (1964-66), 12/9/19

    Dr. Joseph Herbert Vogel (1971-73), 12/3/19

     

    INDIA

    Richard Barber Reidinger (1965-67), 12/10/19

     

    KENYA

    Helen Armstrong, 11/17/19

    William Pitassy (1965-67), 11/22/19

     

    LESOTHO

    Thomas Stovall (1992-94), 11/29/19

     

    LIBERIA

    Allan Beiswenger (1970-72), 11/29/19

    Edward Houston McMillion (1964-66), 12/2/19

     

    MALAYSIA

    Joyce Hofman McHugh (1962-64), 12/2/19

    Elena Grace Wendland (1965-67), 11/25/19

     

    NEPAL

    Regina Plunkett Dowling, 12/5/19

    Virginia "Jinny" M. Moore (1965-67), 11/18/19

     

    PANAMA

    Dr. Pamela York Klainer (1967-69), 9/14/19

     

    PAPUA NEW GUINEA

    Bruce Stark Lowney (1992-94), 10/5/19

     

    PHILIPPINES

    Michael Ryan (1978-80), 11/26/19

     

    SAMOA

    Carol Ann Lauzon (1974-76), 8/26/19

     

    SOUTH AFRICA

    Melissa Maese Amaro, 12/4/19

     

    SOUTH KOREA

    Steven Paul Dolan, 10/6/19

     

    TURKEY

    Marsha Goron Dragonetti (1965-67), 12/1/19

    Marilyn M. McMann Kramer, 11/24/19

     

    COUNTRY OF SERVICE NOT SPECIFIED

    William "Bill" Grealish, 12/2/19

    Pamela Dean Spencer, 12/3/19

     

     

     

     

    If you have information you would like to share for our monthly In Memoriam post, contact obituary@peacecorpsconnect.org.

    Thanks to Betty Pyle for her assistance in preparing this month's In Memoriam page.

     

  • Jonathan Pearson posted an article
    We remember those who served our country in the Peace Corps and recently passed away. see more

    The Peace Corps community mourns doctors, a teacher and interpreter, and the "voice of Wisconsin Public Television" this month.
     

    Chidinma "Chi" Ezeani (1989-2019) had recently been approved for a third-year extension as an agriculture Volunteer in Ghana. After suffering injuries sustained from an accident in her home, Chi died during treatment at a South African hospital. After graduating from the University of California, Riverside in 2011 with degrees in accounting and finance, Chi was hired by the financial firm Foresight ASG. During this time, she volunteered her services as an accounting and business consultant for several non-profit organizations in the San Francisco area. She also studied film at the San Francisco School of Digital Filmmaking and worked in film production.

     

    Jeffrey P. Golden (1942-2019) was a master communicator and the voice of Wisconsin Public Television. As the grandson of refugees from Eastern Europe and Russia, Yiddish expressions peppered his everyday speech. He wrote poetry in both English and Spanish. He enhanced his language proficiency serving in the Peace Corps in Colombia from 1965-1966.  Throughout his career, he produced Spanish language videos; wrote editorials in Spanish newspapers; and provided Spanish language outreach services. In his retirement, he served as a volunteer medical translator at Madison, Wisconsin’s only free health clinic. His work in film resulted in awards from the John Muir Medical Film Festival, the National Educational Film and Video Festival, the International Film and Television Festival of New York, the Cine Awards, the Festival of the Americas, the Telly Awards and the Industrial Film Festival Award for Creative Excellence. Jeffrey also enjoyed being an actor in theater productions in Madison, Wisconsin, playing title roles in Macbeth, Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf, and Fiddler on the Roof. 

     

    Madeline Kaufman Havrilla (1957-2019) studied abroad in Spain while she was a student at Indiana University of Pennsylvania in the 1970’s. She became a Peace Corps Volunteer in the Dominican Republic. Following her service, Madeline traveled to New Orleans to earn her Master’s Degree at Loyola University. She joined the U.S. Department of Labor, serving many years as an investigator to enforce labor laws. She became a union leader, serving her labor department colleagues as vice president and president of AFGE Local 2450. In her private life, Madeline led a Catholic women’s foot washing protest in 1986, advocated for community health and environment issues in Pennsylvania with Sustainable Monroeville, and worked for education improvements within the Gateway School District.

     

    Gordon Frederick Comstock, MD (1943-2019) believed in leaving his campsite – and the worldbetter than he found it. After graduating from Antioch College, Gordon joined the Peace Corps, teaching math in Ghana from 1966-68. He completed his medical studies at Case Western Reserve University and completed his residency at University of Rochester/Highland Hospital Family Medicine Program. Gordon was originally contracted for two years in a “doctor shortage” area; he and his family chose to stay and mentored medical students at his office and took them home for dinner. From 1989 to 2017, Gordon made 29 trips to La Laguna, Honduras as part of NY/HELP mission.

     

    Dr. Dan Mackey, who provided healthcare as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Borneo, graduated from the University of Oklahoma and finished his medical education at the University of Virginia. Upon completion of medical training, Dan began a life of world travel, visiting more than 150 countries. At one point in his career, Dan was the head of the Dermatology department at the King Faisal Specialist Hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. A career in Atlanta began at the Center for Disease Control before opening his own practice. Dan was on the Medical School staff at Emory University; he served in the Emory clinic and trained dermatology residents.

     

    Peter W. Bailey (1940-2019) served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Thailand after graduating from Harvard University in 1962. He also worked for UNICEF. His career included teaching at the Texas Commission for the Blind in Tyler, TX; Notre Dame Special Schools in Irving, TX; and ESL for Dallas Community Colleges. Peter also worked as an interpreter in the Asian refugee project affiliated with El Centro College.

       

    Below is our In Memoriam list for members of the Peace Corps community who recently passed away:

     

    MULTIPLE COUNTRIES

    Timothy John Belay (Albania; Mongolia) 10/12/19

    Louis Giordano III (Ecuador 1999-2001; Panama 2009-10), 11/4/19

     

    BOLIVIA

    Nancy Sturdivant (1962-64), 10/25/19

     

    CAMEROON

    Richard Bartosiewicz, 10/22/19

    Roberta Glaser (Kley) Carlsen, 10/29/19

     

    CHILE

    William Michael Murphy (1964-66), 7/19

     

    COLOMBIA

    Jeffrey P. Golden (1965-66), 9/30/19

     

    COSTA RICA

    Reta J. Holmgren, 11/1/19

    Pedro Lujan (staff), 11/11/19

     

    DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

    Patricia Anton, 11/12/19

    Madeline Kaufman Havrilla (1980-83), 11/16/19

    John Kevin Murphy (1966-69), 9/8/19

    Virginia Streator (1969-71), 11/9/19

     

    ECUADOR

    Joan Ward, 10/19/19

     

    ETHIOPIA

    Wyn Tunnicliff (1966-68), 10/9/19

     

    FEDERATED STATES OF MICRONESIA

    Melba Lucille Shepard (1988-90), 10/30/19

     

    GHANA

    Gordon F. Comstock, MD (1966-68), 10/25/19

    Chidinma Ezeani (2017-19), 10/26/19

    Ronald Kenneth Maxwell (1963-65), 10/7/19

     

    GUATEMALA

    Therese Marie "Teri" (Mignard) Duffy, 6/25/19

     

    JAMAICA

    Bernice Marie Stainbrook (1990-92), 11/9/19

     

    KIRIBATI

    Lela Mayberry (1984-86), 10/29/19

     

    KYRGYZSTAN

    William Joseph Heaphy (1994-96), 10/20/19

     

    LIBERIA

    Jay D. Griffing (1967-68), 9/25/19

     

    MALAYSIA

    Dan Mackey, 11/8/19

     

    NAMIBIA

    Jennifer Schlecht, 11/6/19

     

    ST. LUCIA

    Sidney A. (Sid) Patchett III (1969-72), 9/18/19

     

    SAMOA

    Barbara Mannella, 10/17/19

     

    SOUTH KOREA

    Michael S. Kraskowski (1970-72), 11/16/19

     

    TANZANIA

    George Lewis Edgington (1963-66), 11/9/19

     

    THAILAND

    Peter Welles Bailey, 10/31/19

    Armin Richard Konrad, 10/14/19

     

    UKRAINE

    David Patrick Phelps (2005-07), 10/28/19

     

    COUNTRY OF SERVICE NOT SPECIFIED

    John Osborne, 11/10/19

    Joyce Stone, 10/22/19

    Donald M. Witlin, 10/26/19

     

     

     

     

    If you have information you would like to share for our monthly In Memoriam post, contact obituary@peacecorpsconnect.org.

    Thanks to Betty Pyle for her assistance in preparing this month's In Memoriam page.

  • Jonathan Pearson posted an article
    We honor members of the Peace Corps community who recently passed away. see more

    As we honor the 58th anniversary of the signing of the Peace Corps Act, we remember the accomplishments of those who recently passed away with the distinction of being known as Returned Peace Corps Volunteers.

     

    Dr. Thomas Andrew Boyd (1942-2019) served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Colombia before beginning his distinguished international teaching career. Dr. Boyd studied at Wabash College; The Institute of Social Studies, The Netherlands; and earned his Doctorate at Cambridge University. Dr. Boyd’s diverse assignments included teaching at West Virginia Wesleyan College, Wolfson College, The Hague, Netherlands; and University of Cape Coast, Ghana, West Africa. He was a visiting professor of sociology at Zhongshan University in the People's Republic of China; a participant with Habitat for Humanity International in Peru; a consultant, Rural Development Planner/Trainer with United Nations Food and Agriculture mission to Zambia; a research assistant with the Institute of Social Studies, The Netherlands; and a workshop leader for Economic Development in Puerto Rico. For 29 years before his retirement, Dr. Boyd taught at Berea College and served as Chair of the Department of Sociology.

     

    Dorothy Elizabeth (Betsy) Brown's career as a reporter at The New York Times and other papers began at the University of California, Berkeley, where she wrote for the student paper. After the start of World War II, she left college to work on a dock, took a troop ship to Hawaii, and joined the Women's Air Raid Defense. After the war, she was a reporter at The Honolulu Advertiser and then the San Francisco Examiner. After a move to New York City, she eventually became a writer at Newsweek. For many years Betsy was a reporter at The Patent Trader in Mt. Kisco, NY.  Betsy received numerous awards, including a national prize for a series on the burdens on corporate wives. In the late 1960s she became director of communications for the Urban Development Corp. in Westchester. After retiring, she went to Antigua for two years with the Peace Corps, where she lived over a store in a small inland village and worked with the Chamber of Commerce, organized a women's sewing group, and survived Hurricane Hugo in 1989.

     

    Janice Jaeger Burns was a public health advocate, Peace Corps Volunteer, and globetrotting adventurer. A graduate of St. Joseph College and Boston University School of Nursing, she was among the first Peace Corps volunteers sent to Malaysia in 1962. Janice deepened her commitment to public health with positions at the World Health Organization, the Pan American Health Organization, Project Hope, and the Aga Khan University, living and working in a number of countries including Pakistan, Columbia, Ethiopia, and Venezuela. 

     

    Bruce MacBain was an author, scholar, and teacher. He served in the Peace Corps in Malaysia. Bruce taught ancient history at Vanderbilt and Boston Universities after earning his B.A. in Classics from the University of Chicago and his Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania. His historical novels Roman Games and The Bull Slayer are mysteries set in ancient Rome. His trilogy, Odd Tanglehair's Saga, is a Viking coming-of-age story set in 1000 AD. His forthcoming action/thriller, Shanghai Blues, follows an African-American jazz trumpeter caught up in opium gangs and communist cadres in 1927 Shanghai.

     

    Ira Okun served his country as a veteran of the Korean War and in Ghana as Deputy Director of Peace Corps from 1968-1971. Although early in his career Ira worked with delinquents as a probation officer and Superintendent of Marin County's Juvenile Hall, he shifted his career to work in prevention programs, taking a series of leadership positions at nonprofits serving youth and families. Ira served as executive director of a residential program for troubled teenage girls, and as CEO of Family Service Agency of San Francisco. Ira managed programs in geriatrics, mental health, teen pregnancy, child development, and child abuse prevention. He was the founding president of the California Association of Local Conservation Corps, which generated income to improve educational and occupational programs for at-risk youth.

     

    Dr. William Lloyd Paly worked in rural health in Liberia as a Peace Corps Volunteer after earning his undergraduate degree from Clark University in 1975. In 1981, he earned a M.A. from the Harvard School of Public Health before starting his career as a physician. Bill attended the University of Massachusetts School of Medicine, completed his residency in Orthopedic Surgery at Yale University, and a fellowship in hand surgery at Tufts University. Since joining Coastal Orthopedic Associates at Beverly Hospital in 1992, he helped thousands of patients.

     

    Mary Burch (Tracy) Ford attended Trinity College in Washington, DC, but, rather than graduate, she withdrew to work in Baltimore, then in London, England. She joined the Peace Corps in 1967, where she served in Senegal at a social center with a kindergarten, adult literacy classes, and prenatal health classes. There she met Brian Ford who was also serving as a Peace Corps Volunteer. The couple moved to Boston, where she finished college at Boston University, magna cum laude.  She then earned a M.A. in Social Work at Simmons College.  Professional positions included serving as a residential counselor at Groton School, Dean of Students, and then Head of School at Miss Porters School, where the library is now named the M. Burch Tracy Ford Library. Upon retiring, she served on multiple boards, including the Maranyundo Girls School in Rwanda, Kings Academy in Jordan, and the Council for International Educational Exchange.

     

    Joan Mary Ambre was Superior of the Convent and Principal of the Aquin High School in Freeport, IL. During her 15 years as a Dominican nun, Joan received both a B.A. and a M.A. in English literature. Joan met Earl Ambre in 1967, left the Dominican Order in 1969, and together they joined Peace Corps, where they made life-long connections in Jamaica, Barbados, and Lesotho. Joan held many administrative positions in the Peace Corps, Bureau of Land Management, and Departments of Labor and Interior. Joan retired as the Director of Personnel for the Peace Corps in 1996.

     

    Sister Hilda Carey taught in various Sacred Heart high schools in New York, Connecticut, and Michigan. She earned a M.A. at Manhattanville College, in Purchase, NY. She learned basic Korean with the Peace Corps in Korea, and developed a particular love for Korea and Japan. She also taught at the International School in Tokyo, Japan. She became professor of English at the Sacred Heart College for Women, Chun Cheon and Pucheon, Korea. During these years, she also taught at the University of Maryland, University College campus in Seoul, Korea. Sister Carey returned to New York and worked at Green Hope Services for Women in East Harlem, where she helped formerly incarcerated women prepare for their GED. In 1986, she began teaching at Boston College, a position she held until well into her eighties.

     

    Dr. James "Jim" Fallon McTigue was in the inaugural class of the Peace Corps providing modern health care in Bolivia. After Peace Corps, he served our nation's most needy, becoming the first Chief Scientist of the U.S. Public Health Service. He co-authored the Surgeon General's Report on AIDS. After retiring from the Public Health Service, Captain McTigue went on to direct the Master of Public Health program at the University of South Carolina School of Public Health.

     

    Below is our In Memoriam list for members of the Peace Corps community who recently passed away:

     

    PEACE CORPS STAFF

    Joan Mary Ambre, 9/18/19

     

    MULTIPLE COUNTRIES

    James Jarrett Rusk (Sierra Leone 1961-63; Uganda staff 1964-68), 10/7/19

    Daynese Santos (staff Swaziland 2005-13; Burkina Faso 2005), posted 10/9/19

     

    ANTIGUA

    Dorothy Elizabeth (Betsy) Brown (1988-1990), 9/26/19

     

    BELIZE

    James Kendall Shipman, 9/23/19

     

    BOLIVIA

    James Fallon McTigue (1962-1964), 9/22/19

     

    COLOMBIA

    Joan Craig Clark Stewart, 9/13/19

     

    DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

    Jeffrey Thomas "Freddie" Carter, 8/9/19

     

    GHANA

    Ira Okun (staff 1968-1971), 9/30/19

     

    JAMAICA

    Norman Jerome "Jerry" Domann, 10/6/19

     

    LESOTHO

    Don Hanni (1993-1994), 10/15/19

     

    LIBERIA

    Dr. William L. Paly (1976-1978), 10/7/19

     

    MALAWI

    Lynn Earl Blough (1982-1984), 9/21/19

     

    MALAYSIA

    Laura Jangla Audrey, 9/28/19

    Janice Burns (1962-1964), 9/22/19

    Bruce MacBain (1964-1965), 9/27/19

     

    MOROCCO

    Carey E. Bell, 9/30/19

     

    NIGER

    Leonard Strauss (1964-1966), 9/21/19

     

    NIGERIA

    George P. Clarke (1961-1963), 8/15/19

    Edward Alonza Holmes (staff 1966), 8/12/19

     

    PHILIPPINES

    John E. Arnold (1962-1964), 10/4/19

    Mike Charles, 12/24/18

     

    SENEGAL

    Mary Burch Ford (1967-1969), 10/2/19

     

    SIERRA LEONE

    Bette Maxwell (1987-1989), 9/29/19

     

    SOUTH KOREA

    Sister Hilda Carey, 9/16/19

    Phil Suttle, posted 9/28/19

     

    TANZANIA

    Charles Rock, 10/12/19

     

    TONGA

    Lara Ethel Payne (2007-2009) 8/5/19

     

    COUNTRY OF SERVICE NOT SPECIFIED

    James Connell, 9/28/19

    Shirley Ellis-Knoernschild (1986-1987), 12/13/18

    Robert B. Francis, 9/22/19

    William L. "Scott" Gard, 7/23/19

    George Scholz, 9/16/19

    Ed Ward, 10/13/19

     

     

     

     

    If you have information you would like to share for our monthly In Memoriam post, contact obituary@peacecorpsconnect.org.

    Thanks to Betty Pyle for her assistance in preparing this month's In Memoriam page.

  • Jonathan Pearson posted an article
    Remembering those whose legacy includes Peace Corps service. see more

    As we honor the 58th anniversary of the signing of the Peace Corps Act, we remember the accomplishments of those who recently passed away with the distinction of being known as Returned Peace Corps Volunteers.

       

    Carol Chuckrow Guernsey died just two months after celebrating her 50th wedding anniversary with her husband Sherwood, with whom she had served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Panama. The meaningful relationships they developed in Panama informed them in ways that served them the rest of their lives; they became avid supporters and advocates of immigrants. Later in life, Carol and Sherwood returned to Panama to start computer learning centers that are still operating today. They also traveled throughout Latin America, the Caribbean, many European countries, and Guernsey Island. Carol earned a B.A. from Mt. Holyoke College, a degree in nursing from Russell Sage College, and a master's degree in nurse midwifery from the Frontier School of Nursing. Carol and Sherwood have been very generous supporters of NPCA over the years.

     

    Dr. Thomas Andrew Boyd (1942-2019) served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Colombia before beginning his distinguished international teaching career. Dr. Boyd studied at Wabash College; The Institute of Social Studies, The Netherlands; and earned his Doctorate at Cambridge University. He was published extensively. Dr. Boyd’s diverse assignments included teaching at West Virginia Wesleyan College, Wolfson College, The Hague, Netherlands; and University of Cape Coast, Ghana, West Africa. He was a visiting professor of sociology at Zhongshan University in the People's Republic of China; a participant with Habitat for Humanity International in Peru; a consultant, Rural Development Planner/Trainer with United Nations Food and Agriculture mission to Zambia; a research assistant with the Institute of Social Studies, The Netherlands; and a workshop leader for Economic Development in Puerto Rico. For 29 years before his retirement, Dr. Boyd taught at Berea College and served as Chair of the Department of Sociology.

      

    Kathy Lynn Radimer (1951-2019) was a nutritionist researcher and scholar. She served in the Peace Corps in Upper Volta/Burkina Faso in 1975-1978 and went on to work with USAID in Cameroon in 1979-1982. Through these experiences, she developed a love of Africa. She completed her B.A. and M.Ed. at the University of Massachusetts, and her Ph.D. in nutrition at Cornell University. Her doctoral thesis work resulted in the Radimer-Cornell Hunger Scale, which was further developed and used as a measure of hunger/food insecurity on a global scale. In Australia in the late 1980s, she worked as a Research Fellow for the National Health and Medical Research Council at the University of Queensland. When she returned to the U.S. in the late 1990s, Kathy became a Fellow with the National Cancer Institute. She then worked for the Centers for Disease Control as an epidemiologist.

     

    Westcott "Wes" Burlingame III (1946-2019) served in Peace Corps Thailand and worked in public health abroad before starting his own business, Laurel Springs Nursery, and leading tree-planting projects back in the U.S. Wes earned a B.A. in political science from Ohio Wesleyan University. After his Peace Corps service, primarily in malaria eradication, Wes received a master's degree in public health from the University of Michigan. Wes worked in refugee relief with USAID in Laos and farmed in Fiji before serving for two years with UNICEF-Kathmandu in maternal-child health programs. He spoke Thai fluently and returned annually to enjoy Thai culture, friends, and cuisine. Wes pursued his love of horticulture, working at the Biltmore Estate vineyards and the Mountain Horticultural Crops Research Station in Mills River.

     

    James S. Wilson’s (1947-2019) 72 years were filled working with his hands and enjoying the outdoors. After graduation from the University of Minnesota, he joined the Peace Corps and taught in a school in Fiji. As an RPCV, Jim spent a month traversing Glacier Park in Montana. He emigrated from the U.S. to Canada and taught in Deadwood Alberta, while living in a tee-pee he sewed himself. While in Canada, he worked in oil fields, built a log building, climbed peaks of the Canadian Rockies, and built and flew an ultralight plane. Jim got his pilot's license and bought a biplane, the Wichawk; other planes followed, including a Jenny replica and the Zenair CH701, which he loaded with camping gear and took on many a trip around the Pacific Northwest and California. He bought a kit to build an RV12, got his floatplane certification, and his airframe and powerplant ticket so he could be the mechanic on his own planes. Jim learned about the "stitch and glue" technique of building small watercraft and he went all in, buying plans and kits by the dozen. One of his hopes was to participate in the Race to Alaska in a small boat of his own design. Friends said Jim lived with “enthusiasm, curiosity, integrity and optimism.”

       

    Below is our In Memoriam list for members of the Peace Corps community who recently passed away:

     

    BOLIVIA

    Shirley Ann Haase, 9/6/19

     

    BRAZIL

    Chester L. Davis II, 9/19/19

    Lynda Witcher Peddy (1966-1967), 8/4/19

     

    BURKINA FASO

    Kathy Radimer (1975-1978), 9/5/19

     

    CHILE

    Sterling Edwin "Ned" Zimmerman Jr., 9/8/19

     

    COLOMBIA

    Thomas A. Boyd (1964-1966), 8/20/19

    Barbara Muchisky (1965-1966), 4/29/19

    Martha Louise Cooch Ramsey, 9/15/19

     

    DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

    Robert Bowden Law (1962-1964), 9/1/19

     

    ECUADOR

    Robert Joseph "Bob" Fey, 9/15/19

     

    ETHIOPIA

    Anne Marie Bussey (1967-1969), 8/21/19

     

    FIJI

    James S. Wilson, 8/21/19

     

    GABON

    John Vincent Mascolo Jr. (1963-1965), 9/7/19

     

    HONDURAS

    Landon Karr (2006-2008), 9/13/19

     

    JAMAICA

    Richard Arthur "Dick" Cozine (1991-1993), 8/16/19

     

    KENYA

    Emily Anne Distler CHA/PA, 8/1/19

     

    LESOTHO

    William Kevin "Bill" Savage Jr. (1977-1979), 8/31/19

     

    LIBERIA

    Elaine deProsse (1967-1968), 9/14/19

     

    MAURITANIA

    Stephanie Joyce Kimball (1986-1987), 9/8/19

     

    NIGERIA

    Daniel Paul Conroy (1967-1969), 8/27/19

    Michael A. (Hryhoryszyn) Gregory, 9/5/19

    Millard Hayes Jr. (1966-1968), 9/15/19

    Carol (Martin) Schneckloth (1963-1965), 7/19

     

    PANAMA

    Carol Guernsey (1969-1971), 9/1/19

     

    PERU

    Eliot Levinson (1964-1966), 9/5/19

     

    PHILIPPINES

    Preston Hayes, 8/19/19

    Carl Castleman Smith, 9/4/19

    Stanley J. Szalak (1971-1974), 9/19/19

    Marie Ward (1965-1967), 4/25/19

     

    SENEGAL

    Roger Alan Harding (1986-1988), 8/17/19

    Kristin Anne Regan, 9/15/19

     

    SWAZILAND

    Amanda De Fiebre (2007-2009), 8/30/19

    Stephen T. Oblock (1971-1975), 8/31/19

     

    TANZANIA

    Joel William "Bill" Chapman (1964-1965), 9/12/19

    Jacob Podsialdo, 9/8/19

     

    THAILAND

    Westcott "Wes" Burlingame III (1968-1970), 9/24/19

     

    UGANDA

    Deanna Mary Sterett, 7/27/19

     

    VENEZUELA

    Robert G. Black (1964-1966), 8/30/19

     

     

     

     

     

    If you have information you would like to share for our monthly In Memoriam post, contact obituary@peacecorpsconnect.org.

    Thanks to Betty Pyle for her assistance in preparing this month's In Memoriam page.

  • Jonathan Pearson posted an article
    We remember those who served in the Peace Corps and recently passed away. see more

    It's no surprise that members of the Peace Corps community possess and develop a wide range of skills and talents. Among those who recently passed away, we honor founders of humanitarian organizations, teachers of English around the world, and individuals committed to vocations ranging from music to herpetology.


    Vincent H. Beckman III devoted his distinguished law career to enabling social justice. Vincent received a bachelor of arts from Notre Dame University, a masters in Sociology from the University of Chicago, and a juris doctorate from Northwestern University. As a Peace Corps Volunteer in Peru from 1966-1968, he helped organize community development projects. Later, he worked with the Office of Economic Opportunity (OEO) in Puerto Rico, and as a VISTA Volunteer. In 1970, Vincent served in Peru helping with earthquake relief. Upon return to Chicago, Vince taught ESL classes at Chicago City Colleges and taught sociology at YMCA Community College. While in law school, he worked at the Northwestern Legal Clinic. He joined the firm of Zeitlin & Schwab, and worked with Legal Aid Foundation Chicago (LAF) as a staff attorney in the Migrant Project. He accepted a position as Executive Director of Michigan Migrant Legal Assistance Project then returned to LAF as Supervisory Attorney of the Migrant Project. After leaving state employment, he continued this service by co-founding a nonprofit called Farmworker and Landscaper Advocacy Project, aka FLAP (Ayuda para Trabajadores del Campo y Jardineros). 


    Robert Taylor (1941-2019) served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Colombia and Brazil and was an accomplished musician. Robert graduated from Grinell College with a major in music. While there, he was also active in theater. Throughout his life, Robert was always a musician: trombonist, composer, arranger, a player in groups big and small. Jazz became his first love in high school. At Grinnell College he played in a group led by the great Herbie Hancock. While serving in the Peace Corps, he learned from the Latin jazz musicians with whom he lived and played. Once back in the States, he did graduate work in ethnomusicology, first at Wesleyan, then at Indiana University. From there it was the hardscrabble life of a musician, ready to play what was set before him: in a band that backed Motown groups (Temptations, Supremes, Spinners, Four Tops); on tour with Broadway show companies (Fiddler on the Roof, Company, No No Nanette, Seesaw); summers in the Catskills (Grossinger's and the Deville) and at the Grand Hotel on Mackinac Island; in Grand Rapids with the Bruce Early Big Band, the Grand Rapids Jazz Orchestra, and the Midtown Horns; and, showing again his versatility, as part of a brass choir for the Roman Catholic Bishop of Grand Rapids. When he settled into a “day job,” he taught Spanish and TEFL at Grand Rapids Community College.


    Terese (Schirmer) Piccoli (1929-2019) was an international traveler for many of her 90 years. She had a self-professed "awakening to feminism" in the 1960s while being a wife and mother to seven children, and soon became politically active. In 1977 Terese earned a masters in public administration from the University of Pittsburgh. She co-founded MC Consultants, a management consultant group supporting small businesses, especially those run by women and people of color. In 1990, at the age of 61, Terese was among the first Peace Corps volunteers to serve as teachers in then Czechoslovakia. After three years in Prague at Charles University, she taught for a summer in Egypt, then for a year at the Universitas Katolik in Bandung, Indonesia. From there, she taught in Hohhot, China, at the Inner Mongolia Polytechnic University, in Pohnpei at the College of Micronesia, and for a year in Ghana with the International Foundation for Education and Self-Help/Teachers for Africa Program.


    Benjamin "Ben" Edison Trumble (1956-2019) was a world traveler and said to be most-likely-to-sneak-a-snake-on-a-plane. An avid herpetologist, Ben worked at the Bronx Zoo before serving with the Peace Corps, where he worked in agricultural sectors on the coastal villages outside Tela, Honduras. Back in the U.S., Ben established his lifelong connections to zoos and circuses, as later documented in his A Mudshow Season blog, where he traveled for several seasons as an assistant manager for Carson & Barnes, Culpepper & Merriweather, and Kelly Miller, the big three of America's surviving tent circuses. In 1994, Ben settled in California where he became an Internet pioneer, helping to set up Sports Illustrated's website and producing live internet events for the Sci-Fi Channel and People Magazine.
     


    Van Roy Southworth (1949-2019) will be remembered for his irreverent humor, his unwavering optimism, and his open heart. Van's love for international service was born when he served in the Peace Corps in Ethiopia after college graduation. He earned a bachelor of arts in economics from Washington State University in 1971, and was a member of Phi Beta Kappa. Upon returning from the Peace Corps, Roy earned a masters and doctorate from the Food Research Institute at Stanford University. Following a brief research stint in Ghana, Roy accepted a role at the World Bank in Washington, D.C. where he spent the remaining 29 years of his career. While at the World Bank, he lived and worked in Tanzania and Croatia, before ultimately retiring in the country of Georgia in 2008. Roy and his wife Cathy, along with a local partner in Georgia, co-founded The McLain Association for Children (MAC), benefiting vulnerable children and adults in Georgia. As country manager for the World Bank, Roy was instrumental in founding ISET, an economic university in Tbilisi.


    Richard James Sands (1943-2019) was a Peace Corps Volunteer who taught English in Eritrea from 1965-1967. He was a graduate of St. Thomas University and the University of Minnesota Law School. In 1964, he did research in India with the Student Project for Amity among Nations (SPAN). After law school, he worked as a Minnesota Senate Counsel, then with the firm of Peterson, Popovich, Knutson & Flynn, and later in his own private practice. In St. Paul, he became a Senior Revisor of Statutes at the Minnesota Legislature, where he helped write and edit many laws on education and governance. He was particularly proud of his major project to make all Minnesota statutes gender neutral. He loved books and had a large collection on writing style, biographies, golfing, theology, and American literature. In retirement, he got a certificate in Teaching of English as a Foreign Language, and taught briefly in Italy.

       

    Below is our In Memoriam list for members of the Peace Corps community who recently passed away:

      

    PEACE CORPS STAFF

    Ann Michael Mathews, 7/12/19

     

    MULTIPLE COUNTRIES

    Braxton Luther Combs (Morocco; Tunisia), 8/19/19

    Jane Lindsey (Thailand; Sri Lanka; Belize), 7/31/19

    Josef Stagg (Dominican Republic; Sierra Leone), 8/6/19

    Robert Taylor (Brazil; Colombia) 8/19/19

     

    CZECH REPUBLIC

    Terese (Schirmer) Piccoli (1990-1993), 7/26/19

     

    ECUADOR

    Carol Beal (1963-1965), 8/9/19

     

    ETHIOPIA

    Richard James Sands (Eritrea 1965-1967), 7/29/19

    Van Roy Southworth, 7/23/19

     

    HONDURAS

    Benjamin Edison "Ben" Trumble, 8/18/19

     

    INDIA

    Virginia Bodner, 8/5/19

    Wallace Edward Tyner (1966-1968), posted 8/25/19

     

    MACEDONIA

    Jessica Nguyen Davidson, 8/5/19

     

    MALAYSIA

    Daniel Joseph "Jay" Glenney IV, 8/16/19

    Vernon Madison (staff), 7/30/19

     

    MOROCCO

    Thomas Frank Woolley, 7/19/19

     

    NIGER

    Joey Jeter, posted 8/21/19

     

    NIGERIA

    Jean Elizabeth Boyd (1966-1968), 8/1/19

    James McNamara (staff 1966-1968), 8/10/19

     

    PANAMA

    Raymond Wyss Neiger (1963-1965), 7/28/19

     

    PERU

    Vincent H. Beckman III (1966-1968; 1970), 7/24/19

     

    PHILIPPINES

    Nicole O'Brien Stone, 7/26/19

     

    SENEGAL

    Gary Engelberg (1965-1967), posted 8/19

     

    SLOVAK REPUBLIC

    Norma McCarroll Hacker (1996-1998), 8/3/19

     

    THE GAMBIA

    Michelle Lyon (1986-1988), posted 8/4/19

     

    TUNISIA

    Roger H. Evans (1968-1970), 8/8/19

     

    VENEZUELA

    Judith Ann Morhar (1966-1969), 6/8/19

     

    COUNTRY OF SERVICE NOT SPECIFIED

    John Alec Morgan, 8/8/19

     

     

     

     

    If you have information you would like to share for our monthly In Memoriam post, contact obituary@peacecorpsconnect.org.

    Thanks to Betty Pyle for her assistance in preparing this month's In Memoriam page.

  • Jonathan Pearson posted an article
    We honor members of the Peace Corps community who recently passed away. see more

    This month, we honor members of the Peace Corps community who have died, and also mourn the deaths of two serving volunteers who made the ultimate sacrifice while serving their nation.

     

    Alan Hale died at age 80 following a bicycle accident in the Philippines where he was serving as a Volunteer in Southern Leyete province. He was working with local officials on waste management issues, conducting trainings for more than 2,000 people to address issues ranging from trash burning to littering. Alan was on his second tour of duty as a Peace Corps Response Volunteer, having begun his Philippines service in September 2017. His first work with Peace Corps actually began five decades earlier, when he worked as a training officer in Puerto Rico for three years in the 1960's. A longtime resident of Bellefontaine, Ohio, Alan played a key role in the development and expansion of the Logan County Solid Waste District. He also served his community as a former assistant Logan County prosecutor. He was an active member of Kiwanis International and Toastmasters International, and served on a number of boards, including the Logan County Art League.

     

    Donovan Gregg of Beaverton, Oregon, was also on his second tour of Peace Corps service when he died following a July 23rd motor vehicle accident in Rwanda. Working as a Peace Corps Response Volunteer with his wife Jessica, Donovan was serving at a university in Kigali, training English teachers. The Greggs previously served as Volunteers in Ethiopia from 2014-2016. A graduate of Western Oregon University, Donovan received his TEFL-certification. He later earned a masters degree from the Willy Brandt School of Public Policy in Germany. Prior to his Peace Corps service, Donovan worked as an English teacher in South Korea, Afghanistan, and India.

     

    John Hogan's (1938-2019) Peace Corps career began with service as a Volunteer in Venezuela in 1964. As reported by John Coyne in Peace Corps Worldwide, "Hogan was one of the very few PCVs who went against Shriver’s direction and made the Peace Corps his career. He was a Volunteer in Venezuela 1964-66; Peace Corps Staff in Colombia 1966-68; Peace Corps Staff Burkina Faso 1979-82; and PC/HQ 1989-97. It was during this period in D.C. where he was briefly the Acting Director of the Agency, making him the first RPCV to hold that position in the Peace Corps".

     

    Barbara Jeanne Coulston Struble (1943-2019) earned her bachelors degree in English from San Jose State University and later completed her masters and PhD studies in archeology at the University of California-Los Angeles. Barbara’s full and fruitful life included serving as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Nigeria; an inner city school teacher of English, math and science; and a staff archeologist at sites in England, Mexico, Greece, Italy, the La Brea Tar Pits, and throughout the high deserts of Nevada and the Great Basin. Her many travels contributed to her being proficient in a half-dozen languages, including Igbo, French, Greek, and German. Other interests led Barbara to serve as a guide and counselor at Camp Curry, Yosemite, a gospel choir member, and a half-marathon runner.

     

    Neil Jay Rovner (1946-2019) became an activist in 1964, protesting the exclusion of African-Americans from the Mississippi delegation to the Democratic Convention held in Atlantic City. Neil attended Lafayette College in Pennsylvania, graduating Phi Beta Kappa in 1968. He protested the Vietnam War while at Lafayette, and chose to serve his country by volunteering for the Peace Corps, where he was assigned to Micronesia. After returning from service, he earned masters degree in education from Temple University. While teaching at a high school during the day, he attended law school at Temple University at night. After admission to the Pennsylvania bar in 1975, Neil clerked for the Honorable Glenn E. Mencer on the Commonwealth Court. Neil's practice was devoted to plaintiff's personal injury, including medical malpractice and product liability. He was recognized as one of the "Best Lawyers in America" for 20 years, and in 2013 was named a Top 100 trial lawyer by the National Trial Lawyers. In 2014, he was selected by his peers as Lawyer of the Year in the Harrisburg area. Since 2005, Neil worked to ensure the legacy of Hope Springs Farm, a day program in Hershey he created with his wife to benefit their daughter and other adults with intellectual/developmental disabilities and autism. Hope Springs Farm provides their "growers" with the meaningful experience of tending organic crops and caring for animals.

     

    George M. Kuhn's multifaceted career included volunteering in the Peace Corps at a teachers’ college in Ciechanow, Poland from 1993-1996. Decades earlier, George had served our nation as a U.S. Coast Guard radioman from 1951-1954, mainly in the Pacific. In George's professional life, his creative career included a mix of newspaper journalism, writing ads and promotional materials, teaching, and even acting. After playing a major role in a Robert Altman feature film in 1956, he studied drama, thus opening doors to acting in university and community theater, commercials, and two more feature films. George finished his masters degree in creative writing at Queens College in New York. In retirement, he wrote songs with his son Bob, and got to record "Adios Lounge” with singer Tom Waits.


      

    Below is our In Memoriam list for members of the Peace Corps community who recently passed away:

      

    PEACE CORPS STAFF

    John Hogan (Colombia 1966-1968; Burkina Faso 1979-1982; U.S. 1989-1997), 7/22/19

    Frederick William Madison Jr. (U.S. early 1960's), 6/3/19

    August Hale Vandermer (U.S. early 1960's), 4/18/19

     

    MULTIPLE COUNTRIES

    Donovan Gregg (Ethiopia 2014-2016; Rwanda 2019), 7/23/19

    James Delbert Nelson (India 1963-1965; Colombia 1969-1970), 7/8/19

    Lonny Rodgers (Somalia, Kenya 1968-1970), 3/18/19

     

    BELIZE

    Margaret Louise (Gowey) Botts (1994-1996), 6/26/19

     

    CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC

    Roberta Ann "Robbie" Hedeen (1985-1987), 7/18/19

     

    CHILE

    Joseph E. Martinez (1966-1968), 7/5/19

     

    COLOMBIA

    Don Lydic (1964-1967), 6/25/19

    William Joseph Stowe (1963-1965), 7/8/19

     

    COSTA RICA

    Linda Korich, 5/30/19

    Arne Landsberg (1964-1966), 6/30/19

     

    CZECH REPUBLIC

    Janice Swanson Moore (1993-1995), 6/13/19

     

    DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

    Tom Gittins (1967-1969), 7/16/19

     

    ECUADOR

    Rev. John Swanson Queen, 7/16/19

     

    EL SALVADOR

    Jack L. Schinstock (1970-1973), 7/10/19

     

    GABON

    Stephen McNutt, 7/5/19

     

    GUATEMALA

    Heather Knopp, 6/11/19

     

    INDIA

    Gloria Y. Katzmark (1965-1967), posted 6/30/19

     

    IRAN

    Thomas Bell Brigham (1969-1971), posted 7/10/19

    James Harold Jensen, 7/11/19

     

    JAMAICA

    Elizabeth Rose Strickland, 6/16/19

     

    MALAYSIA

    William T. Winter (1966-1968), 6/30/19

     

    MAURITANIA

    Nancy Cheryl Fink Lower (staff), 5/14/19

     

    MICRONESIA

    Neil Rovner, 7/18/19

     

    MOROCCO

    Mary Ann (Seume) Cate (1965-1967), 6/30/19

     

    NAMIBIA

    Marjorie Turner (1993-1995), 7/13/19

     

    NIGERIA

    Frank E. Brockman, 7/10/19

    Mitchell Adelbert Poling (1965-1967), 7/6/19

    Barbara Jeanne Coulston Struble (1965-1967), 6/13/19

     

    OMAN

    Peggy Fender (1975-1977), 5/26/19

     

    PERU

    John Rose Dickson (1962-1964), 7/17/19

    Louis Santangelo (1967-1969), 7/18/19

     

    PHILIPPINES

    Alan Hale (2017-2019), 7/11/19

    Joan E. Landfield (1961-1962), 7/13/19

    Dennis W. Lum, 7/7/19

    Scott Rubenstein, 7/25/19

     

    POLAND

    George M. Kuhn (1993-1996), 7/12/19

     

    ROMANIA

    Jacqueline A. Stark (1992-1995), 7/3/19

     

    SAIPAN

    Judith Harriff Uherbelau (1966-1968), 6/24/19

     

    SENEGAL

    Kenneth M. Murphy (approx 1988-1991), 6/20/19

     

    SOUTH KOREA

    Ralph Victor Kaplan (1969-1971), 7/23/19

    Joseph Fink Murnan (1972-1975), 6/29/19

     

    THAILAND

    Quentin Michael Sullivan (1968-1970), 7/4/19

     

    TOGO

    James "Tyler" Dickovick, 7/1/19

     

    COUNTRY OF SERVICE NOT SPECIFIED

    Virginia Ann Sagarski-Caldwell, 3/29/19

     

     

     

     

    If you have information you would like to share for our monthly In Memoriam post, contact obituary@peacecorpsconnect.org.

    Thanks to Betty Pyle for her assistance in preparing this month's In Memoriam page.

  • Jonathan Pearson posted an article
    We remember and honor those who served in the Peace Corps and recently passed away. see more

    From Follansbee, West Virginia to Painesville, Ohio or Tacoma, Washington to Cedar Rapids, Iowa, the Peace Corps experience took some of our community members who recently passed away to places that perhaps they'd never imagined. As a recent Peace Corps campaign asked "Life is calling, how far will you go?," these RPCVs and community members answered that call to the fullest.


    Dr. Maurice “Moe” Sill (born in Follansbee, West Virginia) was one of the Peace Corps pioneers who served as the training officer for the initial group of Volunteers sent to India. From 1961-1963, he served as the first country director of the Peace Corps in Pakistan. When his family returned to the United States in 1963, Moe continued his work with the Peace Corps in Washington, D.C. for the next year. He 
    received his BS from the University of Virginia in 1945, then an MS and later a PhD (both from Penn State University). Moe and his family moved to India, where he served as an agricultural missionary for eight years. Working with India’s government as a rural life analyst, he was instrumental in establishing their Agricultural Extension Service and India Village Service. After Peace Corps, Moe worked on the U.S. “War on Poverty” program from 1964-1971. He retired from the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Marshall University in 1990. He also served his country as a U.S. Navy veteran.

     

    Will Lotter (1924-2019) joined the Peace Corps in 1965 and took his family to Malawi, where he served as deputy country director and then country director. He also served as in-country staff in Nepal. Over the past fifty years, Will and his wife Jane devoted much of their time working on social justice issues, especially for victims of Central American violence. They were co-founders of the Davis (CA) Religious Community for Sanctuary. Will was a University of California at Davis (UCD) Hall of Fame coach, a U.S. Navy aviation veteran, an inspiring professor, and a humanitarian leader. A talented athlete, he played football for Cal Berkeley in the 1949 Rose Bowl and played baseball in the 1947 College Baseball World Series. In addition to teaching, his long career included coaching football, baseball, soccer, and tennis. His awards included induction to Cal Aggie Athletic Hall of Fame and the UCD Law School Martin Luther King Jr. Lifetime Achievement Award. The City of Davis named him as recipient of their Peace and Justice Award, as well as Humanitarian of the Year.


    Muriel Ann (Pennant) Hoyt (Born in Tacoma, Washington 1930-2019) had a full, non-traditional life. She was most proud of her work fighting infectious diseases, first for the State of Oregon, and later for the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) in Atlanta. This work took her to Africa four times: with a World Vision emergency medical team in Ethiopia during famine, Somalia during civil unrest, Swaziland, and, lastly, Lesotho, where Muriel served in the Peace Corps after her retirement from the CDC. 
    She earned a BS from the University of Oregon School of Nursing, becoming a registered nurse. Muriel then worked in public health for the State of Oregon, writing rules that governed nursing homes and patient care. She later earned a Master of Public Administration degree from Portland State University.


    Dr. James (Jim) McNitt returned to Africa as a teacher at the University of Malawi after serving as a Peace Corps Volunteer in the early 1970's. Jim earned degrees from Cornell University, the University of Wisconsin, and Colorado State. In the U.S., he was an Animal Science Professor at Southern University A&M College for 25 years before retiring in 2009. He was affectionately known as the "chicken and rabbit" professor. Jim was a also a member of the Baton Rouge Zoo, the Big River Economic and Agricultural Development Alliance, the Red Stick Farmers Market, Partners of the Americas, and Farmer-to-Farmer, where he worked alongside farmers in El Salvador and Haiti.


    Paula Cornwell Miles (Born in Painesville, Ohio 1942-2019) volunteered for the Peace Corps upon graduation and was assigned to Afghanistan, where she served in 1964-1966. After her service, Paula traveled throughout Europe. She later taught high school biology in international schools in London, Sao Paulo, and Geneva. 
    As a scientist, she worked at the United Nations Environmental Programme in Switzerland and upon return to the U.S. at the US Environmental Protection Agency. 


    Carl P. Onken (Born in Cedar Rapids, Iowa) joined the Peace Corps in 1968 after graduating from Iowa State University, where he met his future wife, Mary (Haak) Onken. He was assigned to serve in Sierra Leone. During his second year as a PCV, Mary joined him there to marry and serve together, working to help improve the schools in the rural regions of the country. Carl and Mary continued their support of education and youth programs in Sierra Leone throughout their lives. When they returned to the United States, Carl settled first in Manhattan where he completed his MBA before joining Chase Manhattan Bank, working as a Systems Analyst for over 35 years. 
    He served on the school board for Monroe-Woodbury, NY for 21 years, the Orange-Ulster BOCES School Board for 29, and the New York State School Board for 12, including two as president of the board.

      

    Below is our In Memoriam list for members of the Peace Corps community who recently passed away:

      

    PEACE CORPS STAFF

    Will Lotter (Malawi, Nepal 1965-1967), 5/19

    Dr. Maurice Lucien "Moe" Sill (India 1961; Pakistan 1961-1963; U.S. 1963-1964), 6/6/19

     

    MULTIPLE COUNTRIES

    John Francis Murphy (Tunisia 1962-63; Gabon 1963-1964), 6/9/19

     

    AFGHANISTAN

    William Kaschub, 5/19/19

    Paula Cornwell Miles (1964-1966), 3/6/19

     

    BELIZE

    Edith Lucile Torgerson (1986-1988), 5/21/19

     

    BOTSWANA

    Jackie Jacobs, 4/18/19

     

    BRAZIL

    John J. Cassidy (1968-1971), 6/6/19

     

    BURKINA FASO

    Gerald J. Hof (1973-1975), 6/1/19

     

    COLOMBIA

    Dr. Merrilee Cunningham (1967-1969), 6/2/19

    Andrew Nelson Fiori, 5/19

     

    COTE D'IVOIRE

    June Rose Crawford (1996-1998), 6/3/19

     

    DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

    Phyllis P. Rzewnicki, 6/12/19

     

    ECUADOR

    John Bowland (1968-1969), 5/31/19

    Patricia Valentine Roy, 6/4/19

     

    EL SALVADOR

    Tito Campos, 6/2/19

     

    ETHIOPIA

    Branden Michael Hamel (2018), 5/13/19

    John Terrence "Terry" O'Herron (1962-1964), 6/1/19

     

    FIJI

    Kent Hinnart, 5/21/19

     

    INDIA

    Linda S. Lonsdale (1968-1970), 5/30/19

     

    JAMAICA

    Bruce K. Bellin, 5/2/19

    Mary Helen Cameron (2004-2006), 6/13/19

    Thomas R. "Rom" Chevraux, 5/18/19

     

    KAZAKHSTAN

    Joan Z. Himmelhoch, 6/20/19

     

    KENYA

    Bethany Ann Tomala (2001-2003), 4/19/19

     

    LESOTHO

    Muriel Ann (Pennant) Hoyt, 6/16/19

     

    LIBERIA

    Lonny V. Main, 4/27/19

     

    NIGERIA

    Michael E. Colbert, 1/8/19

     

    PERU

    John Walter Harden (1968), 6/15/19

     

    PHILIPPINES

    Donna J. Hess (1966-1969), 6/16/19

    Ellen Jeronimo (1961-1963), 5/19/19

     

    POLAND

    Pamela Wells Hanson (1991), 6/11/19

     

    ROMANIA

    Michael G. "Mike" Rae, 5/6/19

    Richard Logsdon Young, 5/28/19

     

    SAINT LUCIA

    Gilbert Martin Makus, 3/17/19

     

    SAMOA

    Mary Alice Batchelor (1993-1995), 6/21/19

     

    SIERRA LEONE

    Carl P. Onken (1968-1970), 6/6/19

    Larry Wayne Square, 5/31/19

     

    SWAZILAND

    Dr. James McNitt (1971-1973), 5/22/19

     

    THAILAND

    Carol (Price) McLean (1983-1985), 6/9/19

    Michael Joseph Sinsko (1965-1967), 5/22/19

    Leila McKimmon Webster (1974-1976), 5/22/19

     

    TURKEY

    Robert Kennedy McBride (1965-1967), 5/20/19

     

    VENEZUELA

    John Sanbrailo, 4/20/19

     

    COUNTRY OF SERVICE NOT SPECIFIED

    Thomas Lawrence Minnis, 5/10/19

    Ronald Pletcher, 6/1/19

     

     

     

     

    If you have information you would like to share for our monthly In Memoriam post, contact obituary@peacecorpsconnect.org.

     

    Thanks to Betty Pyle for her assistance in preparing this month's In Memoriam page.

  • Jonathan Pearson posted an article
    We honor members of our community who recently died. see more

    We mourn the loss of Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Chelsea Decaminada, who died from injuries sustained during recent terrorist attacks in Sri Lanka. We also honor community leaders whose service impacted so many lives, both here in the United States and abroad.

     

    Chelsea Decaminada, an international program specialist on assignment for the U.S. Department of Commerce, died May 4 due to injuries she sustained during terrorist bombing attacks on Sri Lankan churches and hotels on Easter Sunday. “Chelsea devoted her life to public service, and her dedication and spirit were a model for all of us at Commerce,” said Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross. After Chelsea earned her bachelor's degree from Duke in 2015, she became a Peace Corps Volunteer in Tanzania. She was fluent in French and Swahili. U.S. Ambassador Alaina Teplitz posted about Decaminada: “We pay tribute to Chelsea—and all those lost and injured—by partnering with Sri Lanka and nations around the world to bring unity in the face of terrorism."

     

    Rodolfo Mendez (1945-2019) danced in New York City after his high school training in ballet, flamenco, and folkloric dance, but his Peace Corps service in Costa Rica (1966-68) profoundly affected his path to Austin, Texas, where he founded the trailblazing Ballet East Dance Company. Rudy was inducted into the Austin Arts Hall of Fame in 2006. In 2004, the National Endowment for the Arts honored Ballet East for its Dare to Dance program. East Austin nonprofit People Organized in Defense of Earth and Her Resources (PODER) honored Mendez with the Cesar E. Chavez “Sí Se Puede!” Award for his commitment and dedication to the community. Other honors included the Award of Excellence from the Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center, as well as being named one of Austin’s Trailblazers by the Austin History Center.

     

    Kathy Sue Kasprisin (1954-2019) lived a life of service, impact, adventure, inspiration, and love. Kathy earned a bachelor's degree from Auburn University, a master's degree in International Development from the School for International Training, and was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship through the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs and Latin American Studies. Her commitment to service began as a Peace Corps Volunteer in El Salvador from 1977-79. She returned briefly to the United States to lead initiatives for FEMA, Planned Parenthood, and Proyecto Libertad. In 1985, Kathy returned to El Salvador as a Program Officer for Save the Children during negotiated peace breaks between the Salvadoran military and FMLN forces. The United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) recruited her to serve as Deputy Commissioner in Belize from 1989-1993. Kathy was an especially accomplished triathlete, but, while swimming off the coast of San Pedro, Belize she was struck by a motorboat in 1993. Despite profound mobility and speech impairment following the accident, Kathy went on to serve as a VISTA volunteer in Austin, Texas, Commissioner for the Austin Mayor's Committee for Persons with Disabilities, Board Member for the Returned Peace Corps Volunteers, and a Consultant for the Johnson Scholarship Foundation.  

     

    Lourdes Maria Monserrat (1947-2019) was born in Havana, Cuba, where she excelled in swimming and represented Cuba in the Pan-American games in Chicago in 1959. At the time of the Cuban Revolution, Lourdes and her family were forced to leave Cuba and eventually settled in Albuquerque, where they built a new life in New Mexico. Lourdes graduated Summa Cum Laude from the University of Albuquerque. Lourdes and her brother Bernardo served as Peace Corps Volunteers in Honduras. After a second stint with Peace Corps in Africa, Lourdes returned to New Mexico. She moved to a ranch in Santa Fe, where she adopted foster children, became a Big Sister, started a summer camp, volunteered at an animal shelter, and became a member of the Santa Fe Buddhist Center. Lourdes was an avid student of politics and public affairs. In addition to being a licensed New Mexico practicing attorney and having a master's degree, she completed all but her PhD dissertation in Latin American studies. She had a position on Governor Jerry Apodaca’s staff, and served two stints in D.C. on behalf of New Mexico.

     

    Raymond A. Willem (1936-2019) was a retired professor of mechanical engineering, champion of charitable causes, and devoted nature enthusiast. He earned his bachelor's, master's, and PhD from the University of Illinois. Ray’s teaching career spanned 35 years and 4 countries. Beginning in 1962, he taught physics, mathematics, and mechanics as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Nigeria. He later taught at the University of the Americas in Cholula, Mexico, the University of Nairobi in Kenya, and at the New Mexico State University. Some of Ray's proudest achievements included his design work on artificial hearts for IBM in 1965, and his development of micro-lens grinders for endoscopic surgery at Karl Storz Endovision from 1991-1993. He also conducted research for the U.S. Naval Laboratory in Washington, D.C., and for NASA at the White Sands Test Facility near Las Cruces, New Mexico. 

     

    Barbara Jean Keegan (1941-2019) was born and raised in Montana, attending Eastern Montana College and then began teaching in the towns of Sydney and Hamilton. In 1966, Barbara began her Peace Corps service in Panama, where she traveled the country teaching youth and met her husband, John Keegan. The two began a family and moved to Nicaragua to help with humanitarian efforts following a devastating earthquake in 1972, only returning to America in 1977 so that their children could attend American schools. The family started a small farm in New Hampshire, and Barbara worked part time as a church secretary, bookkeeper, and librarian. She started a summer reading program for local readers and authors of all ages, taught Sunday school, served on the County Advisory Council, and formed the Boscawen Agricultural Commission.

     

    Timothy Jon Lathrop (1948-2019) completed his bachelor's degree at the University of South Florida and his master's degree at the University of Hartford. After college, both Tim and his wife Judy served in the Peace Corps in Liberia for three years, where their son Jeffrey was born. Tim taught sciences in the Nursing and Medical Schools in Monrovia, and he also established the country’s first EKG unit. He helped start the first Nursing School program and administrating JFK Hospital in Liberia. Leaving the country due to the civil war, Tim moved the family to be part of a biomedical device company, Medtronic, where he spent 31 years as a manager. Early in his retirement, Tim found a passion for walking; he walked 900 miles in Florida and completed a total of 16 Grandma's Marathons.

     

    Below is our In Memoriam list for members of the Peace Corps community who recently passed away:

      

    PEACE CORPS STAFF

    Robert Allan Brown (1964-2002), 5/3/19

    Susan Doolittle, 5/4/19

    Theodore Kroeber, 2/26/19

    Ruth Elaine Lagerberg, 4/12/19

     

    MULTIPLE COUNTRIES

    Lourdes Maria Monserrat (Honduras, unspecified country in Africa), 3/26/19

    James A. McGowen (Nigeria 1966-67; Kenya 1967-68)

    Joan Wuehler (Niger 1988-90; Lesotho), 4/19/19

     

    AFGHANISTAN

    Brigitte Broetz Hamilton (1965-67), 4/2/19

     

    BOLIVIA

    Kevin Patrick Lynch (1967-69), 3/8/19

     

    BRAZIL

    Arlene Reny Mayhugh (1964-66), 5/4/19

    Roberta F. Varner (1963-65), 1/13/19

     

    CHILE

    Helen Josephine Caspar Quistorff (1967-68), 4/20/19

     

    COSTA RICA

    Wendy Martin de Mora (served in early 70's...death reported in early 2019)

    Rodolfo "Rudy" Mendez (1966-68), 5/5/19

     

    COTE D'IVOIRE

    Nicholas Gaines Augustus IV (1970-72), 4/21/19

     

    EL SALVADOR

    Kathy Sue Kasprisin (1977-79), 4/2/19

     

    GHANA

    Helen Heard Etheridge (1988-89), 4/29/19

    Cindy Scott-Harpin (1982-85), 4/12/19

    Robert Arthur Yawin Sr. (1971-73), 4/21/19

     

    INDIA

    Burl LeRoy Reading (1962-64), 4/8/19

     

    IRAN

    Judith Dg Strohl (1962-64), 4/30/19

     

    JAMAICA

    Janet H. Sledge (1966-68), 3/6/19

     

    LIBERIA

    Timothy Jon Lathrop, 3/30/19

     

    MALAWI

    Cindy Cardenas Buecker, 4/28/19

     

    NEPAL

    Beverly Heegaard (1962-64), posted 4/29/19

    William Francis Salisbury (1991-93), 3/9/19

     

    NIGER

    Michael Donel Bettler (1967-69), 3/28/19

    Edward A. Porter (1962-64), 4/30/19

     

    NIGERIA

    Gracia Elizabeth "Hobson" Hiatt (1966-68), 10/13/18

    Margot Butterfield Siekman (1963-66), 4/16/19

    Barbara Ladi Terry (1968-70), 1/13/19

    Dr. Raymond A. Willem (1963-64), 4/11/19

     

    PALAU

    Lawrence Beauchamp Jr. (1966-69), 3/28/19

     

    PANAMA

    Barbara Jean Keegan (1966-69), 4/12/19

     

    PHILIPPINES

    Bonnie Heimbuch (1986-88), 4/16/19

     

    SENEGAL

    Patricia "Poppy" Lark (1963-65), 4/23/19

     

    SOLOMON ISLANDS

    Lawrence F. Piper (1976-78), 4/20/19

     

    SURINAME

    Bellaire Ballard Krudop (1998-2000), 8/24/18

     

    TANZANIA

    Chelsea Decaminada (2016-18), 5/4/19

     

    TURKEY

    David Bloch (1963-65), 4/14/19

     

    COUNTRY OF SERVICE NOT SPECIFIED

    Brenda Lee Chang, 3/13/19

     

     

     

     

    If you have information you would like to share for our monthly In Memoriam post, contact obituary@peacecorpsconnect.org.